<ul><li>Human Resources  </li></ul>Further reading:   http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newSTR_90.htm PMBOK Chapter 9...
Human resources By the end of this session you will: Describe the components of  organisational culture Explain the basics...
Common aspects that are considered part of human resource are: Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture   </li></ul>...
Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture   </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles   </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation   </li></ul><...
What is Organisational culture? Human resources>organisational culture What is The ‘culture’ where  you work?
Human resources>organisational culture A great many people refer to the classic phrase coined by the  McKinsey organisatio...
Human resources>organisational culture The Cultural Web
Human resources>organisational culture The Paradigm- six interrelated elements that help to make up what  Johnson and Scho...
Human resources>organisational culture Stories  – The past events and people talked about inside and outside the company. ...
Human resources>organisational culture Rituals and Routines  – The daily behavior and actions of people that signal accept...
Human resources>organisational culture Control Systems  – The ways that the organisation is controlled.  These include fin...
Human resources>organisational culture Organizational Structure  – This includes both the structure defined by the organiz...
Human resources>organisational culture Power Structures  – The pockets of real power in the company.  This may involve one...
Human resources>organisational culture Symbols  – The visual representations of the company including logos, how plush the...
Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture   </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles   </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation  </li></ul><u...
Human resources>team roles What are Team roles? Teams need to have the right specific (technical) skills and a balance of ...
Human resources>team roles Two widespread approaches: Belbin’s team roles (www.belbin.com)   and   Myers-Briggs.
Defines team roles in the way one person’s behavior relates to others as part of a team.  Belbin’s team roles Human resour...
Human resources>team roles
Myers-Briggs looks more at personality, divides population into 16 types: Myers-Briggs Human resources>team roles <ul><ul>...
Human resources>team roles How useful do you think this type of profiling is?
Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture   </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles   </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation  </li></ul><u...
Human resources>motivation Motivation “ the driving forces that make people act as they do.” www.pearsoned.co.uk/
Human resources>motivation <ul><li>Intrinsic  Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Extrinsic  Motivation </li></ul>Motivation can ...
Human resources>motivation Intrinsic  Motivation Extrinsic  Motivation When the drive to work come from within the person....
Human resources>motivation books, websites, advice, coaching is easy to come by.  But don’t forget the basic fact that:  m...
Human resources>motivation What motivates you?
Human resources>motivation How can you get the best out of a team?
Human resources>motivation <ul><ul><li>productivity increases with attention given to workers by management. Implies socia...
Human resources>motivation Leadership styles   <ul><ul><li>1. Task  behaviour   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This refers to ...
Human resources>motivation Leadership styles   four basic styles: For a new/immature subordinate, the relationship will st...
Human resources>motivation Transactional Analysis   The roles we play during conversations can be thought of as three basi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Project Management 8 Human Resources

1,962 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Career
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,962
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
76
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Project Management 8 Human Resources

  1. 1. <ul><li>Human Resources </li></ul>Further reading: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newSTR_90.htm PMBOK Chapter 9 http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes1.htm
  2. 2. Human resources By the end of this session you will: Describe the components of organisational culture Explain the basics of team role analysis Discuss the elements of motivation Complete a past exam question List the common aspects that are considered part of human resource
  3. 3. Common aspects that are considered part of human resource are: Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Legal aspects of employment such as contracts and recruitment, working environment, etc. (not discussed here) </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling – (not specifically discussed here). </li></ul>
  4. 4. Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Legal aspects of employment such as contracts and recruitment, working environment, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>(not discussed here) </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling – (not specifically discussed here). </li></ul>
  5. 5. What is Organisational culture? Human resources>organisational culture What is The ‘culture’ where you work?
  6. 6. Human resources>organisational culture A great many people refer to the classic phrase coined by the McKinsey organisation , that culture is “ how we do things around here”. And while that may be true, there are so many elements that go into determining what you do and why, that this definition only scratches the surface.
  7. 7. Human resources>organisational culture The Cultural Web
  8. 8. Human resources>organisational culture The Paradigm- six interrelated elements that help to make up what Johnson and Scholes call the “paradigm” – the pattern or model – of the work environment. By analyzing the factors in each, you can begin to see the bigger picture of your culture: what is working, what isn’t working, and what needs to be changed. Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  9. 9. Human resources>organisational culture Stories – The past events and people talked about inside and outside the company. Who and what the company chooses to immortalise says a great deal about what it values, and perceives as great behaviour. Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  10. 10. Human resources>organisational culture Rituals and Routines – The daily behavior and actions of people that signal acceptable behavior. This determines what is expected to happen in given situations, and what is valued by management Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  11. 11. Human resources>organisational culture Control Systems – The ways that the organisation is controlled. These include financial systems, quality systems, and rewards (including the way they are measured and distributed within the organisation.) Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  12. 12. Human resources>organisational culture Organizational Structure – This includes both the structure defined by the organization chart, and the unwritten lines of power and influence that indicate whose contributions are most valued. Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  13. 13. Human resources>organisational culture Power Structures – The pockets of real power in the company. This may involve one or two key senior executives, a whole group of executives, or even a department. The key is that these people have the greatest amount of influence on decisions, operations, and strategic direction. Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  14. 14. Human resources>organisational culture Symbols – The visual representations of the company including logos, how plush the offices are, and the formal or informal dress codes. Cultural web - modified after Johnson, G, 1988, “Rethinking incrementalism”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 9, pp. 75 – 91.
  15. 15. Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Legal aspects of employment such as contracts and recruitment, working environment, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>(not discussed here) </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling – (not specifically discussed here). </li></ul>
  16. 16. Human resources>team roles What are Team roles? Teams need to have the right specific (technical) skills and a balance of personal attributes. If an ideal can not be reached, it helps to have an insight into personalities.
  17. 17. Human resources>team roles Two widespread approaches: Belbin’s team roles (www.belbin.com) and Myers-Briggs.
  18. 18. Defines team roles in the way one person’s behavior relates to others as part of a team. Belbin’s team roles Human resources>team roles The accurate delineation of these TEAM ROLES is critical in understanding the dynamics of any management or work team.
  19. 19. Human resources>team roles
  20. 20. Myers-Briggs looks more at personality, divides population into 16 types: Myers-Briggs Human resources>team roles <ul><ul><li>Introvert (I) or Extravert (E) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sensing (S) or Intuition (N) – processing information based on facts (S) or insight (N) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thinking (T) or Feeling (F) – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>making decisions based on logic (T) or personal values (F) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Judgement (J) or Perception (P) – organising your life based on structure (J) or flexibility (P) </li></ul></ul>http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes1.htm
  21. 21. Human resources>team roles How useful do you think this type of profiling is?
  22. 22. Human resources <ul><li>Organisational culture </li></ul><ul><li>Team roles </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Legal aspects of employment such as contracts and recruitment, working environment, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>(not discussed here) </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling – (not specifically discussed here). </li></ul>
  23. 23. Human resources>motivation Motivation “ the driving forces that make people act as they do.” www.pearsoned.co.uk/
  24. 24. Human resources>motivation <ul><li>Intrinsic Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Extrinsic Motivation </li></ul>Motivation can be thought of as two basic types:
  25. 25. Human resources>motivation Intrinsic Motivation Extrinsic Motivation When the drive to work come from within the person. Eg a desire to succeed, prove something to yourself etc. When the drive to work come from outside sources. Eg money, pressure, consequences, etc.
  26. 26. Human resources>motivation books, websites, advice, coaching is easy to come by. But don’t forget the basic fact that: motivation and de-motivation is affected most by one person interacting with another person.
  27. 27. Human resources>motivation What motivates you?
  28. 28. Human resources>motivation How can you get the best out of a team?
  29. 29. Human resources>motivation <ul><ul><li>productivity increases with attention given to workers by management. Implies social need. </li></ul></ul>Hawthorne Effect
  30. 30. Human resources>motivation Leadership styles <ul><ul><li>1. Task behaviour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This refers to ‘direction’. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication patterns, between leader and co-workers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Relationship behaviour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This refers to the socio-emotional support of the team member . Friendship, respect and trust of leader for his co-workers </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. Human resources>motivation Leadership styles four basic styles: For a new/immature subordinate, the relationship will start off in the Telling mode , then, as maturity increases go through selling , participating and delegating . Problems come when delegating is confused with abdicating (from either party!). Some of the difficulties can be overcome by objective setting.
  32. 32. Human resources>motivation Transactional Analysis The roles we play during conversations can be thought of as three basic types: Child Parent Adult The role we adopt is governed by the relationship we have with the other party.

×