Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Diplomacy in Cyberspace
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Diplomacy in Cyberspace

622

Published on

The Future of Public Diplomacy (Wilton Park, March 2007)

The Future of Public Diplomacy (Wilton Park, March 2007)

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
622
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Diplomacy in Cyberspace Aleks Krotoski University of Surrey The Guardian
  • 2. So people are playing games. So what? • People are gathering in these spaces • People are communicating with one another • People are developing meaningful relationships • People are creating new understandings • People are participating
  • 3. But before we get ahead of ourselves… • The differences between online and offline: – Anonymity – Physical appearance – Physical proximity – Greater transience (more weak ties) – Absence of social cues
  • 4. So how can the interactions in cyberspace be meaningful ? • In traditional definitions of “community”, there’d be no such thing in cyberspace – How can you develop meaningful relationships with people you’ve never met?
  • 5. It’s been happening for years • These virtual worlds are the places which the online communities are tied to
  • 6. So how does it happen? • Virtual worlds are designed that way – people must rely upon one another to survive and advance • Anonymity becomes Pseudonymity • Whatever role trust plays in offline communities, it plays in online communities because these interactions are human-bound
  • 7. This is where things get interesting • Incorporating real-world ritual into the virtual • Commemorating real-world events • A non-official policing force in a space where an official police are absent • Representational government for the people by the people • Judicial systems • Thriving economies worth tens of millions of USD
  • 8. So what does this mean for public diplomacy? • These spaces integrate the functionality of the internet, the creativity enabled by digital media and the collaborative possibilities offered in the networked age • They are integrated and immersive media platforms which encourage active participation, collaboration and innovation • They extend traditional information access, and support new ways of creating exchanges and experiences for a global population
  • 9. Some people have chosen to study them
  • 10. Others have chosen to use them • Charities • Political Parties – Global Kids – John Edwards 08 – UNICEF – National Front – American Cancer Society – UKIP – Childline • N/GOs • Governments – Centre for Disease – Sweden Control – The Netherlands – NOAA – World Economic Forum
  • 11. So how do you do it? • It’s very easy. It just takes a bit of planning. The most important thing to remember is that it all comes back to the community – What are their social norms? – What can you provide which offers value? – What can you provide which offers the community a stake in how and where you’ll fit into the social landscape?
  • 12. In sum • Virtual environments are thriving worlds populated by tens of millions around the world • They simulate and stimulate • People are motivated to participate • And if you want to get involved, you must too
  • 13. Thank you Aleks Krotoski aleks@toastkid.com http://www.toastkid.com

×