Hotspots of biodiversity
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Short note on Hotspots of biodiversity (environmental studies FAQ)

Short note on Hotspots of biodiversity (environmental studies FAQ)

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Hotspots of biodiversity Presentation Transcript

  • 1. HOTSPOTS OF BIODIVERSITY  The concept of hot spots in biodiversity was developed in the year 1988 by Norman Myes.  "hot spots are the richest and the most threatened reservoirs of plant and animal life on earth".  This concept was developed on the basis of two important consideration (i) The species which are not founds elsewhere and (ii) difference of loss of habitat.
  • 2.  According to this concept 25 hot spots have been identified for conservation of biodiversity.  Amongst these, 15 hot spots have tropical forest in Mediterranean typed zones and the rest are present in tropics.  India has two hot spots. These are Western Ghats and Eastern Himalayas. Both of these areas are inhabited by a variety of flowering plants, reptiles, mammals, amphibian and butter flies.