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Bim in uk arto Bim in uk arto Presentation Transcript

  • Public Clients as the Driver for BIM Adoption – Why and how UK Government wants to change the construction industry? Professor Arto Kiviniemi School of Architecture School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Our basic problem: Construction industry is difficult to change School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Poor development of productivity Productivity Growth in the UK Construction Industry 1993-2003 School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Silos and blinkers • Standardised roles, but at the same time poor understanding of the information flows and needs in the process School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Business models and work processes • Low bid ad-hoc teams • Clients select the services based on the lowest price – in design this basically means selecting the least effort • Sub-optimisation • Because of the low-bid business model, everyone must minimise their own workload, despite of the fact that the consequent mistakes increase total costs. • Missing business benefits for upstream partners • Why would they produce more or better information? • Legal responsibilities • Fear that new methods increase uncertainty and risks • Systemic Innovations, i.e. product and process innovations that require changes in multiple firms, are difficult to implement in project based industries. School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Biggest challenge: Resistance to change School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • “It will not slice a pineapple” • “Propose to any Englishman* any principle, or any instrument, however admirable, and you will observe that the whole effort of the English mind is directed to find a difficulty, a defect, or an impossibility in it. • If you speak to him of a machine for peeling a potato, he will pronounce it impossible: if you peel a potato with it before his eyes, he will declare it useless, because it will not slice a pineapple. • Impart the same principle or show the same machine to an American, and you will observe that the whole effort of his mind is to find some new application of the principle, some new use for the instrument.” Charles Babbage, 1852 *In the context of my presentation this is not an English feature, but typical for the AECOO industry Many people try to invent excuses why not accept changes – such as BIM – but the real reason is that they do not want to change! School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • The industry needs a wake up call... School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Some public owners demanding BIM • GSA (General Services Administration, USA) 2007 • First only Spatial Programme Validation, later expanded to Energy Performance & Operations and Circulation & Security Validation • Senate Properties (Finland) 2007 • Models mandatory through the whole design process • COBIM 2012 national BIM requirements covering the whole information lifecycle • • • • USACE (US Army Corps of Engineers) 2008 USCG (US Coast Guard, USA) 2009 Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority 2009 Statsbygg (Norway) 2010 School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • What about UK... School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Point of the Departure – May 2010 • Most people in UK – also in the universities – felt that modelling is not, and will not be, important for AEC professionals in the future: • ”The industry needs people who can make drawings with CAD and our task is to provide those skills. There is no industry demand for BIM and we cannot start teaching it. 3D modelling is too expensive for the industry and too complicated for our students.” School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Paul Morrell on 1st October 2010 1 October 2010 | By Anna Winston ...and typical first reaction in the industry... School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Francis Maude on 31st May 2011 Government will require fully collaborative 3D BIM (with all project and asset information, documentation and data being electronic) as a minimum by 2016. School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • UK Government ____ David Philp 17th April 2012 School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Why? School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Hypothesis “Government as a client can derive significant improvements in cost, value and carbon performance through the use of open sharable asset information” 16 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Valuable Understandable General Non Proprietary Competitive Open Verifiable Compliant Funded Five Year Programme
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Industry problems? School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • ? Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • What is the Strategy? • Push (Supply Chain) – Training – • Early Warning to Mobilise – Methods & Documentation • – PUSH But not force or distort the market? · · · · Contracts Training Technology Legal's Leave the “How” to the Supply Chain PULL How do we ensure we get the information we need to operate the Asset we have bought? How do we gather the information we need to manage the asset? How do we make it fair so we don’t force or distort the market? · · · · 27 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM Do it consistently – PROJECT Be good in buying data (as well as assets and services) – Deliver Level 2 BIM by 2016 How can we make it easier for the supply chain to move forward? Pull (Government) Make it clear what we want When we want it Collect it electronically Keep it simple to start
  • Generic & Specific Building and Civils Delivery Stages Stage 0 Strategy Stage 1 Outcome Definition Gate 0 Gate 1 Gate 4 B Option Select Gate 5 Gate 6 Gate 7 Undertake Competitive Procurement Gate 3 GRIP 1 Output Definition Network Rail GRIP TfL CIMM Pipeling TfL Spearmint GRIP 2/3 Pre Feasibility Option Select GRIP 4 Single Option Selection Startup Define Requirements Production Information Concept D E F G Close H J Pre-Construction Design Deliver / Close Delivery Technical Design Des ign Br ief C P re perat i on GRIP 8 Project Closeout Develop (Build) Initiation B A GRIP 6/7 Const, Test Comm & Handback GRIP 5 Detailed Design Manage Asset Gate 5 Gate 4 Procure / Design Startup RIBA Work stage Establish Service Construction to Practical Completion Gate 2 Design Build Test Mobilisation Gate 1 E Close Tender Action Develop Delivery Strategy D Award Tender Documentation Develop Business Case OGC Gateways Post Practical Completion K L Operational Use Construction Gather 1 2 3 4 20 40 Maintain N Check against clients brief Cost planning Risk Management Use Does the brief meet my requirements in terms of function, cost and carbon? Key Client Benefits Check against project brief Cost planning Tender transparency Environmental Checks Has anything changed? What is being priced by the main contractor? Package Scope check Cost Checks Carbon Checks Has anything changed? Has the design been over value engineered? Key X Data Drops Data Management 28 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM Stage 7 Benefits Realisation C Pre-tender Appraisal CIOB RICS RIBA ICE ACE CIBSE BSRIA HVCA BRE BIFM Gate 3 Stage 6 Project Close Stage 5 Delivery Industry Delivery Stages Savings Achieved Anticipated Savings O&M Data Handover Actual Costs Actual Programme Actual Carbon Performance Did I get what I asked for? Data to effectively manage my asset N N N Data and information to manage the asset base in a safe, clean and cost effective manner. Data drops (N) will be provided as often as is necessary, reflecting notifiable changes to the asset either through maintenance or repurposing Transparency and clear availability of information to proactively managed cost and carbon performance of the asset. Easy presentation of HMG reporting systems for future planning and performance management 60 80 % Benefit Data Drops Gate 2 A Commence TfL (CGAP) Mapping to existing processes with professional institutions Stage 4 Detailed Design Stage 3 Concept Design Stage 2 Feasibility Des ign Development Plan of Works The Project Management Framework (PFM) Lifecycle
  • 29 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM
  • Asset information will be required in COBie format (Construction Operations Building Information Exchange) 30 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM
  • Paul Morrell 2nd November 2011
  • Challenges? School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Understanding and management of expectations Technology Hype Cycle after Gartner ? Leading companies Visibility Majority of the UK industry ? ? ? ? Peak of ? Technology Inflated Trough of Slope of Expectations Disillusionment Enlightenment Trigger Time School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013 Plateau of Productivity
  • Required education Who is educating the educators? 150,000 companies and 3,000,000 people with improved skills Now School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013 2016
  • Relative maturity/competences in UK Lack of strategic and life-cycle competences School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013 Government BIM Strategy: Improving BIM Training & Education by Adam Matthews & David Cracknell
  • Strong domain specific views, lack of holistic view Blind Monks Examining an Elephant School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Main benefits require collaboration School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013 Source: McGraw Hill: SmartMarket Report 2012
  • However, just doing what everyone must do is not very good business... …you must also ask: What’s there for me? School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Key question: What benefits are you trying to achieve with BIM? BIM is not a goal. It is a tool and to use a tool efficiently you must know the goal School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • One size does not fit all… What is your business model? School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • So, where is UK now? The journey has started. A lot of work has been done and is on-going, but even more has to be done… School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013
  • Pilot projects to test requirements · · · · · · Implementation Plan EIR Tender Documents Scoring Process Framework Training Framework Support Departmental Engagement 42 | WWW.BENTLEY.COM · Departmental Strategies · Early Adopters · Sustained Embedded Change
  • BIM policy stage by adoption rating - EMEA 3,5 Finland Project Based BIM Adoption 3 UK 2,5 Germany 2 Sweden Norway Denmark Netherlands 1,5 France Italy Change in 2 years 1 Spain 0,5 BIM Policy and Contract Documentation 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013 Source: Autodesk 2012
  • BIM is a tool – not the goal! National Agency for Enterprise and Construction, Denmark School of Architecture © Prof Arto Kiviniemi 2013