Housing Opportunity 2014 - Healthy Communities through Healthy Policy - A State and Local Perspective, Albert Iannacone
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Housing Opportunity 2014 - Healthy Communities through Healthy Policy - A State and Local Perspective, Albert Iannacone

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Albert Iannacone, Knox County Health Department

Albert Iannacone, Knox County Health Department

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Housing Opportunity 2014 - Healthy Communities through Healthy Policy - A State and Local Perspective, Albert Iannacone Housing Opportunity 2014 - Healthy Communities through Healthy Policy - A State and Local Perspective, Albert Iannacone Presentation Transcript

  • Healthy Communities Through Healthy Policy A State and Local Perspective: Knoxville / Knox County, TN Albert Iannacone, Environmental Epidemiologist Knox County Health Department, Knoxville, TN ULI Housing Opportunity, Denver, CO - May 15, 2014
  • Welcome to Knoxville and East TN
  • Plan East Tennessee (PlanET) “Plan East Tennessee (PlanET) is a regional partnership of communities building a shared direction for our future. We seek ideas about protecting our valuable resources and addressing our challenges regarding jobs, housing, transportation, a clean environment, and community health. Our goal is to create long-term solutions for investments in our region and to define the next chapter in our rich history, leaving a legacy of optimism and opportunity for future generations.”  From the PlanET website: http://www.planeasttn.org/
  • Plan East Tennessee (PlanET)  3-year process  Federal (HUD) and local funding  5 county area served by MPC, ranging from urban to rural communities
  • Plan East Tennessee (PlanET) The region’s population is projected to grow by 300,000 over the next 30 years.  Where will these people live?  Where will they work?  How will they get from one to the other?  What other infrastructure is needed?  What are the implications of this?  Will growth be managed or
  • INDICATORS: Developed Land; VMT & Travel Delay ACRES OF DEVELOPED LAND 2010: 317,000 2040: 432,200 VEHICLE MILES TRAVELED (MILLIONS) 2010: 22.5 2040: 33.8 VEHICLE HOURS OF DELAY 2010: 87,000 2040: 269,000
  • INDICATOR: ACCESS TO TRANSIT PERCENTAGE OF HOMES WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE (1/4 MILE) OF FIXED TRANSIT ROUTES 2010: 22.8% 2040: 14.2%
  • PlanET Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Combination of procedures, methods, tools… …by which a policy, program, or project may be judged… …for its potential effects on the health of a population, and the distribution of those effects within the population. - http://www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces/hia.ht m
  • One Facet of PlanET HIA Analysis If we can project where there will be many more seniors living in 2030… …we can rationally plan for more health care facilities, senior centers, bus routes, etc.
  • Findings of PlanET HIA
  • DISPERSED GROWTH Growth is scattered throughout the region HIGHWAY-ORIENTED GROWTH Growth occurs primarily in suburban locations along major highways GROWTH OF ESTABLISHED CITIES & TOWNS New development is concentrated in existing cities & towns GROWTH OF ESTABLISHED CITIES & TOWNS & NEW CENTERS Growth occurs mainly in established cities and towns and new mixed-use centers in suburban Planning Scenarios In the future, how should we accommodate our children, grandchildren, and new residents? Several Rounds of Public Input
  • The Process Continues…  While the PlanET grant has ended, the community engagement process continues  Valuable collaborations between non- traditional partners established; mechanism for zoning/planning input from beyond the landowner/developer community  Synergy with other efforts underway to promote more livable communities
  • Recent Progress  Re-energized Food Policy Council  Formal establishment of Community Health Council  Expansions to Greenways and Parks  Brownfields redevelopment accelerating  Promotion of public and alternative transportation  Agreement from MPC that Public Health is an appropriate participant in process
  • Recent Progress Only three miles from downtown, Knoxville's 1,000-acre Urban Wilderness presents a unique urban playground for hikers, mountain bikers and trail runners. The first phase … 42 miles of natural surface trails that connects five parks and natural areas along with public and private lands … A 12.5 mile loop connects Ijams Nature Center, Forks of the River Wildlife Management Area, William Hastie Natural Area and Marie Myers Park with trailheads and parking along the route. The main loop offers easy to moderate trails for all users and the additional 30 miles of secondary trails accommodate users from beginner to advanced on dozens of trails of varying terrain. The vision for Knoxville's Urban Wilderness includes the addition of the Battlefield Loop … which will provide an historic and recreational experience featuring three Civil War forts and a city park: the River Bluff; Fort Stanley; Fort Higley; Loghaven; and Fort Dickerson Park. The recent acquisition of 100 acres, generously donated by the Wood Family to Legacy Parks Foundation, will provide a key connection between the existing parks and trails within the Urban Wilderness’ South Loop Trail System and South Doyle Middle School and its Outdoor Classroom. It will also connect additional neighborhoods into the system. The plans for the property call for a variety of trails and features, including a one-mile introductory mountain bike trail for riders of all ages, a skills/play area, 3.5 miles of mixed-use trails featuring two overlooks and three creek-crossing structures. Bikes, Canoes, and SUP Rentals: Ijams Nature Center is partnered with River Sports Outfitters offering bike rentals for use on the trails and greenway and boats for the quarry.
  • Recent Progress
  • Ongoing Challenges  “Tradition of suspicion” (TVA, Oak Ridge) makes finding common ground between urban and rural counties a challenge  Bitter fight in County Commission over MPC Ridge-top Development Policy  Knoxville has 1,171 miles of streets and 319 miles of sidewalks; Knox County 1,992 miles of roads and 48 miles of sidewalks. How to affordably develop infrastructure at that scale to promote healthy living?  Health implications of economic
  • Built Environment & Health In the 21st Century, to deal with the challenges of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer, Public Health needs to define itself more broadly than we have in recent years…  Urban Design is Public Health  Zoning is Public Health  Brownfield Redevelopment is Public Health  School Funding is Public Health  Equitable Economic Growth is Public Health  Environmental Enforcement is Public Health  Food Policy and Food Access are Public Health  Safe, Clean, Affordable Housing is Public
  • Built Environment & Health “If you want to learn about the health of a people, look at the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the places where they live” – Hippocrates, “the father of medicine,” fifth century BC “The connection between health and the dwelling of the population is one of the most important that exists.” – Florence Nightingale, “founder of modern nursing” 1820- 1910
  • Built Environment & Health The built environment includes all of the physical parts of where we live and work… [it] influences a person’s level of physical activity. For example, inaccessible or nonexistent sidewalks and bicycle or walking paths contribute to sedentary habits. These habits lead to poor health outcomes such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. - CDC http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/publications/factsheets/impactofthebuiltenvironmentonhealth.pdf
  • Built Environment & Health
  • For More Information: PlanET: http://www.planeasttn.org/ KCHD: http://www.knoxcounty.org/health/ MPC: http://www.knoxmpc.org/ PlanET HIA: http://www.planeasttn.org/DesktopModules/Bring2mind/DMX/Download.aspx? EntryId=1271&Command=Core_Download&PortalId=0&TabId=143 Together! Healthy Knox: http://healthyknox.org/ Local Food: http://www.knoxfood.org/ http://www.planeasttn.org/Newsroom/NewsArchive/ArticleView/ ArticleId/78/Local-Food-Guide-Grows-from-PlanET-Public- Input.aspx Brownfields: http://www.smartgrowthamerica.org/2013/11/18/mayor-madeline- rogero-on- brownfields-redevelopment-in-knoxville-tn/ Greenways: http://www.outdoorknoxville.com/places/greenways Urban Wilderness: http://www.outdoorknoxville.com/urban-wilderness Eat, Play, Live Video: https://www.knoxcounty.org/health/eplk.php
  • Questions? Get in touch: Albert Iannacone, Environmental Epidemiologist Knox County Health Department 140 Dameron Avenue Knoxville, TN 37917 865-215-5242 (desk) 865-755-2640 (cell)