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Rotary Talk
 

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Talk written by Becky Wright to Sedgemoor Rotary about working with Anger in Somerset.

Talk written by Becky Wright to Sedgemoor Rotary about working with Anger in Somerset.

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  • Slide 3 I have decided to break the talk down into sub headings which are as follows: Personal context ie: An understanding of why I have personally approached the work in the way that I have. Cultural and current approaches Defining anger and looking at the American and UK Models of working Creative ways of working and thinking about anger An opportunity to share with you some of the insights I have gained in specialising in this are of work. Awareness and change Bringing awareness into the therapy and the future,
  • These are the most common definitions of anger.. I noticed how my own definition changed when carrying out the research. I now feel that anger is a signpost to show us what we are clinging onto as a form of identity . Perhaps exploring our sense of identity and what threatens ie what we are protecting could offer an indication of why anger may arise. I also feel that anger is a state of separateness which I will say more about later.
  • Rational Emotive Therapy – They believe that effective anger management relies on identifying, “ healthy” assertive and, “ Unhealthy,” destructive beliefs and change the unhealthy anger to creating new beliefs. Psychodynamic Approach – Helped us to understand how defences and past history influence our recognition and handling of anger The term anger management commonly refers to a system of psychological therapeutic techniques and exercises by which one with excessive or uncontrollable anger can control or reduce the triggers, degrees, and effects of an angered emotional state Most anger management therefore focuses on a way to convey to a client an understandable model of anger and its relationship to triggering thoughts, events and violent behaviour.
  • The model rejects treatment through insight models, family systems theory or cognitive-behavioral models in favour of what supporters call a "sociopolitical model" and San Jose therapist Eric Towle calls a "radical feminist re-education camp," where battery is equated with masculinity. The goal of sociopolitical therapy is to "challenge sexist expectations and controlling behaviours that often inhibit men and motivate them to learn to apply newly learned skills in a consistently non-controlling manner." Intervention deals with sexist expectations and attitudes. Share experience of being in New York Mens Battery Project.
  • A sense of redeeming seeing it in a new way deeming something in the past to be a certain way by shedding new light and bringing this issue into a new awareness. Rogers( 1959: 198) said, Awareness is thus seen as a symbolic representation … of some portion of our experience. He suggests that we should bring our experience into awareness and that it becomes a symbolising process. I am aware at times I have not been ready to hear or understand something , it s as if I wasn’t in the right space of awareness to absorb what I was learning.
  • Without this vision I see a society becoming more at war with itself and on a relentless quest to satisfy the individual desire.
  • The criminal brain. Feelings of aggression seem to originate in the the limbic system of the brain shown here in green. In the field of neurocriminality Professor Adrian Raine a former prison psychologiuast has been investigating the subtle relationship between criminal behaviour, brains and environment for nearly 30 years now. They have conculded that murders especially those that kill in the heat of the moment are likely to have a poor functioning prefrontal cortex. This is the reasoning and and decision making section of the brain that helps to regulate impulse, including feelings of aggression rising from more primitive parts of the brain., The more psychopathic the person research has shown they have less emotional capacity in their moral decision making process. Raine wants to use the research in a preventative way with children. He has realised that children who lack fear are significantly more likely to have a criminal record. Fear helps to put the neurological breaks on aggressive behaviour. Fear protects us from our worst impulses as does our capacity to reflect on our behaviour and strong social networks. Damage to precortex area can cause there not be an emergency break on behaviour. Can we repair this damage. ? Omega 3 can reduce aggressive behaviour, this is critical for brain function, brain structure.
  • The use of relaxation techniques is usually aimed at reducing a client’s physiological arousal state. This would aim to dampen the sympathetic nervous system in situations of anger arousal. The use of relaxation techniques is well documented when working with anger. Suinn and Deffenbacher (1988) based their research on the theory that anxiety and anger are learnt driven behaviours. They believed that we could learn behaviours that eliminated drivers. This could be achieved by teaching clients to identify the internal signs both cognitively and physically. This sounded to me like preventative work and relied upon clients having the cognitive attention necessary to participate in their sixty minute relaxation and visualisation session. I have used relaxation and visualisation as a way of helping clients to notice and work with information stored in their body. At times I have noticed how clients get stuck in their mental state and feel detached from their feelings. By using a simple form of relaxation I have noticed how they find it easier to be with their emotional state and not react to the feelings that emerge. The work of Benson (1975) is often sighted as a pioneer in developing relaxation techniques that use four basic elements: Quiet environment, An object to dwell upon, passive attitude and a comfortable position. He recommends each day a basic meditation that combines these four elements.

Rotary Talk Rotary Talk Presentation Transcript

  • Sedgemoor Rotary Club Working with Anger in Somerset with Becky Wright New Leaf
  • Broken down into
    • Personal context
    • Research with the Winston Churchill Trust.
    • The Somerset Change Domestic Violence programme
    • How I work with individuals who have a problem Managing their anger.
  • Personal Context
  •  
  • Personal Context Personal Context
    • MSc Mind Body and Spiritual Approaches to working with anger.
    • Travelling Fellowship Winston Churchill Memorial Trust 2004 to America to study Holistic Approaches to working with Domestic Violence.
    • New Leaf started in 1992
  • Travelling Fellowship
    • Met with NYPD
    • Researched American Models
    • Visited different organisations involved in Domestic Abuse work.
  • The Gourmet Dinner
    • There is often a
    • gap between who
    • we want to project
    • ourselves as and
    • who we really are.
  • Definition of anger
    • an emotional state ranging from irritation to rage that is excited by a real or imagined injury (Kopper et al 1996)
    • A feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance . (Collins 1991)
  • Anger Stats UK The Sunday Times Magazine - July,16 2006
    • 45% of us regularly lose our temper at work. 64% of Britons working in an office have had office rage.
    • 27% of nurses have been attacked at work.
    • 1 in 20 of us has had a fight with the person living next door.
    • The UK has the second-worst road rage in the world, after South Africa. More than 80% of drivers say they have been involved in road rage incidents.
    • 86% of secondary school teachers in South West suffered verbal abuse and 14% physical abuse
    • 65% of people express anger over the phone, 26% in writing and 9% face to face.
  • Working with anger models
    • Compassion Power Model: This model uses anger regulation instead of anger management. Anger regulation works with healing the pain underneath the anger using memory and visualisation techniques to access the underlying hurt.
    • Behaviourist approach – relies on the assumption that behaviour is learnt and can therefore be unlearnt.
    • Cognitive & Relaxation Therapy – believe that if we change our thoughts we can change the way we feel and therefore change our behaviour
  • Methods continued….
    • Rational Emotive Therapy – They believe that effective anger management relies on identifying, “ healthy” assertive and, “ Unhealthy,” destructive beliefs and change the unhealthy anger to creating new beliefs.
    • Psychodynamic Approach – Helped us to understand how defences and past history influence our recognition and handling of anger
    • Most anger management focuses on a way to convey to a client an understandable model of anger and its relationship to triggering thoughts, events and violent behaviour.
  • Domestic Abuse Statistics
    • 15% of all violent crime involves domestic abuse.
    • It affects 1 in 4 women, and 1 in 6 men at some point in their lives.
    • Two people are murdered every week in the context of a domestic violence situation, accounting for 35% of all murders.
    • Domestic abuse has the highest rate of repeat victimisation.
  • Somerset Change
    • The programme is 1 night a week for 26 weeks or during the day on Saturdays for 15 weeks. Men are required to complete the whole programme and are assessed to determine motivation and suitability. This is a voluntary programme which requires commitment.
  • What does the programme include?
    • Physical Abuse
    • Emotional Abuse
    • Intimacy Abuse
    • Children and Domestic Violence
    • Rebuilding Trust and Respect
    • Each module explores the subject, looks at the victim perspective and teaches theory, applying this to the men’s own experiences.
  • American Domestic Abuse Models
    • The Duluth Model is a "blame and shame" behaviour modification approach, focusing only on the perpetrator's role.
    • The model was developed, not by a team of psychologists and research scientists, but in consultation with "a small group of activists in the battered women's movement," and "more than 200 battered women in Duluth.
  • New Leaf – Anger work
    • Individual sessions
    • Blocks of 10 on a weekly basis
    • Voluntary attendance
    • Adults only
    • Holistic model
  • Non expressed anger
    • Use of Metaphors
    • Short fuse
    • Hot under the collar
    • Seeing red
    • Let off steam
    • Venting your spleen
  • Underlying Anger
    • Anger
    • Hurt
    • Needs
    • Fear
    • Think of something that makes you angry.
    • What is hurting in that person?
    • What is it that they need?
    • What is it that they fear?
  • Awareness
    • Process as a way of bringing awareness to an emotion like anger this is a way of making something conscious. When the transformation begins you can redeem the anger.
    • To redeem – to re- light an internal aspect of ourselves.
  • Anger Hurt Needs Fears
    • Anger and hurt are often two sides
    • of the same coin. Its is an important
    • step in facing the anger of
    • others to know what lies beneath
    • our own anger.
    • This exercise is a way of discovering some of the hurt, needs
    • and fears underlying a personal experience of anger. ( either
    • our own or others)we can start to address those fears rather
    • than be caught in the outward emotion.
  • Why are we angry?
    • I see many people feeling disconnected to themselves and each other. This causes internal anger, depression and a tendency to objectify people externally and individuals feeling separate to themselves and society.
    • I see a society that is becoming fragmented, wanting immediate gratification and getting angry if this need is not satisfied.
  •  
  • Brain
  • Relaxation Techniques
    • The use of relaxation techniques is usually aimed at reducing a client’s physiological arousal state. This would aim to dampen the sympathetic nervous system in situations of anger arousal. I mainly use meditation
  • New Leaf works from the Taunton Community Acupuncture Centre Bath Place Taunton
  • Thank you Becky Wright www.newleaf.uk.com