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ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014
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ABCs of working in Finland Mirka Rahman 13.1.2014

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The ABCs of the working world – …

The ABCs of the working world –
what you should know about working
in Finland

13.1.2014 klo 15-17

Mirka Rahman, Head of Marketing Communications,
Cross-Cultural Trainer and Lecturer

The working culture in Finland involves initiative, reliability
and accuracy . General rules and traditions about greeting
people and conducting yourself at the workplace are also
something you should know before a traineeship or applying for a job in Finland.

The Finnish world of work is governed by several laws and
agreements regulating the operation of the working world,
workplaces, employees and employers.

It is all about the first impression, making the connection
and building the trust. Learn to work with the straightforward Finns and fulfill their expectations. Come and discuss your observations and obtain basic information you really should know.

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  • Kaiken mitä omistan kannan mukanani.
  • Emme saa selkeää käsitystä ihmisestä ensikäsittelyssä
  • What do you think are your competencies?
  • Transcript

    • 1. ABC’S of working in Finland Mirka Rahman
    • 2. Your Guest    Mirka Kristiina Rahman, MBA USA Native of Lappeenranta Head of Marketing Communications, City of Lappeenranta     International affairs, PR in Russia, fam trips Lecturer at LUT & Saimaa University of Applied Sciences: crosscultural issues, management, communications Experienced in USA & Asia for 16 years Back in Finland past 6 years
    • 3. How does the fish describe water?
    • 4. It cannot. It is the only thing it knows. We are all products of our own aquariums.
    • 5. What does this color mean to you?
    • 6. Cold or calm?  Cold, Finland?  Trustable, authorian, peaceful, safe, masculine color  The safest color in the world
    • 7. When a stranger on the street smiles, a Finn assumes that he is: - drunk - insane - or an American
    • 8. Culture the Iceberg
    • 9. Collective Features  Beliefs (what is true)  Values (what is right)  Assumptions (what is real)  Norms (what to do)  Rituals (Etiquette, rites)  Heroes (Leaders, Personalities, etc.)  Symbols (Clothing, Style, Speech, etc.)  Time orientation
    • 10. Culture is not only National Regional Gender Ethnic Sexual preference Religious National Sports Corporate Generational Physical Ability Professional Political/Ideological We are all multicultural!
    • 11. What do you know of Finland? What are your assumptions? Define Finland with two sentences, how the people and the country operate.
    • 12. Cultural Dimensions in the context of Finnish working culture
    • 13. Power distance index (PDI)  The extent to which the less powerful members of organizations and institutions (like the family) accept and expect that power is distributed unequally.  Where is Finland?
    • 14. Low Power Distance in Finland           Equality & equal rights for everyone Accessible superiors Low dependence needs Hierarchy is for convenience Informal relationship Flat hierarchy Subordinates expect to be consulted Subordinates have power to do things Superiors knowledge can be questioned Casual dress-code
    • 15. Individualism (IND)  Individualism versus its opposite, collectivism refers to the degree to which individuals are integrated into groups and feel responsibility for the group.  Where is Finland?
    • 16. Individualistic Finland             Me, myself and I Fulfilling my own obligations Getting my opinions across Tasks over relationships Management of individuals Penalty; loss of self-respect, guilt Flat organization Casual dress-code Prefer to be rewarded for individual effort Comfortable speaking out the issues in mind -Will try to shine even on group assignments -May openly challenge authority --
    • 17. Masculinity (MAS)     Masculinity versus its opposite, femininity, another fundamental issue refers to the distribution of roles between the genders. Masculinity’ dominant values achievement & success Femininity’s dominant values caring for others and quality of life Where is Finland?
    • 18. Feminine Finland          Quality of life and service to others Striving for consensus Work in order to live, continue to work and complain rather than become an entrepreneur Small, slow and modest are the best Overlapping male/female roles -Will not sell him/or herself Will expect to be asked questions about achievements, results Expects work-life-balance (leaves at 4pm) Will expect to receive other than only monetary rewards
    • 19. Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI)  The extent to which people feel threatened by uncertainty and ambiguity and try to avoid these situations.  Where is Finland?
    • 20. Low UAI Finland            Willingness to take risks Comfortable when not working Conflicts regarded as fair play Lower stress, relaxed Fewer rules Avoidance of too many rules and formalities Expects to be creative in his or her duties Lower centralization of tasks Flexibility in contracts and processes Emphasis on new ideas Open for new things and changes
    • 21. Examples PDI 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Finland Sweden IDV Germany MAS Japan UAI Russia CDI Baltic Republics China
    • 22. Low Context Culture    A language is a system for encoding and decoding information In a High Context Culture, many things are left unsaid and relationships value more In Low Context Cultures words explicitly convey the speaker´s message and a lot of formal documentation is used.
    • 23. What it means in Business and HR Management Low-Context Finland       Explicit verbal message expected No reading between lines Flat organization Clear points Linear organization Pragmatic communication preferred
    • 24. To the Point Finns  Finland is a country where considerable weight is attached to the spoken word - words are chosen carefully and for the purpose of delivering a message.  Finns place great value on words, which is reflected in the tendency to say little and avoid 'unnecessary' small talk.
    • 25. Finnish Proverbs “Puhuminen on hopeaa mutta vaikeneminen kultaa.” ”Speech is silver but silence is gold.”
    • 26. Finnish Proverbs “Sanasta miestä, sarvesta härkää.” "Take a man by his words and a bull by its horns."
    • 27. Defining Finland       Finland is highly individualistic feminine culture that appreciates quality of life and believes in equality Not too social or too outgoing It is very hard for a modest Finn to tell that his product is the best in the world even if it is Finns trust their subordinates and their partners Education is highly appreciated Finns are no. 5 in their English skills in the world
    • 28. Defining Karelians         Own tribe in Finland, further from other Finns than Germans are from British Survivers, naturally international business people, sharing, caring, connecting, outgoing, laughing, dancing, singing Over 400,000 people were evacuated over Finland’s new border from the Karelian Isthmus, and Ladoga Karelia in 1943 Lappeenranta has grown partly due to the loss Vyborg Warm, living people When Western Finland touches the least in the world, Karelians touch the most in Finland 2,5M Finns considers themselves Karelian heritage, appreciated trait Finnish Epic Kalevala is collected from Karelia
    • 29. Acculturation Process  Stages: 1. Euphoria – The Honeymoon (happiness and cheerful excitement) 2. Culture shock (unpleasant feelings, disappointment) 3. Acculturation - Adjustment (adaptation to the culture) 4. Stable state – Mastery, becoming bicultural (positive, neutral or negative feelings)
    • 30. If you talk to a man in his language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. -Nelson Mandela
    • 31. Learn Finnish but What is understood without Language?
    • 32. Simple Steps Around the World Smile, the ultimate gesture understood everywhere  Follow the lead of the host        Read the facial expressions and body language Shake hand adequately firmly for 3 seconds Shake hand of ladies when offered Accept the required distance Undress when the host does Remember your Manners    Listen more, speak to the point, never get excited Cross legs from angles, don’t point with your shoes Avoid handsigns and waving at people
    • 33. Improving Cross-Cultural Communication       Use simple words that will convey only the most specific denotative meaning Listen carefully and, if in doubt, ask for confirmation of understanding Avoid stereotyping Respect the local communication formalities and styles, and watch for any changes in body language Show respect by learning a few words Use the right symbols, colors, music, recognizable elements when possible
    • 34. Negotiations in Cross-Cultural Context   You will negotiating a job for yourself The key to any negotiation is to understand the process from the point of view of the other party  Four stages of negotiations:  Relationship building  Exchange of task-related information  Persuasion  Making concessions and agreement  Which should you focus on? Make it as easy as possible for your employer 
    • 35. Make a good First Impression  We decide if we like someone or something in less than quarter of a second  Proper appearance & manners, positive attitude, open mind and a smile always work the magic  Halo effect allows the positive first impression to carry on to your other traits
    • 36. Verbal and nonverbal Effectiveness in Finland        Arrive on time every for meetings, appointments: Finns are on time Everyone including Finns love smiling people Offer a firm handshake ! Maintain eye contact Speak clearly to the point to be understood Remain neutral & polite, Finns do not like too aggressive people Use some Finnish
    • 37. Finnish Proverbs “Kädenpuristuksesta miehen tuntee.” “You know the man by the way he shakes your hand.”
    • 38. Determinants of Your Adjustment to another Culture        Self-Efficacy Stress Management Relational abilities Finding mentors International vs. host country friendships Willingness to communicate Perceptual abilities What do you think are your competencies?
    • 39. Determinants of Adjustment: External factors    Culture novelty: the greater the harder The Job: Role clarity, discretion, novelty, conflict Adjustment to the organizational culture  study the organization
    • 40. Finnish Proverbs “Maassa maan tavalla.” "Behave in every country according to their customs.“
    • 41. Employment in Finland  Nobody shall be discriminated against on the basis of age, disability, sexual orientation or origin  All work performed in Finland must be done in compliance with Finnish law and international treaties binding upon the Finnish government.  Employment is also usually subject to a collective agreement relevant for the sector, defining the rights and responsibilities of employment in more detail. The purpose of these provisions is to protect employees.
    • 42. View on Gender      Men and women have equal rights and relatively high number of women holding advanced positions in politics and other areas of society Chauvinistic or patronizing attitudes are considered unacceptable Finns have become accustomed to politically correct language in which traditional masculine terms are replaced with gender-neutral ones (e.g. 'chairperson') In Finnish the third person singular pronoun hän covers both genders There are also many titles ending with the suffix –mies (man) that are not considered gender-specific
    • 43. Right to Work      Students have a limited right to work, 25 hours a week You have full freedom to work at the times when your educational institution offers no instruction. You are granted 6 months to seek for employment after graduation Infopankki gives easy steps on how to proceed when starting to work in Finland at http://www.infopankki.fi/en/moving-tofinland/coming-to-work-in-finland Finnish Immigration service provides information on working in Finland http://www.migri.fi
    • 44. Employee’s Rights The rights of employees are supervised in Finland by: the police (permits, right to reside in Finland, suspicion of human trafficking) www.poliisi.fi the occupational safety and health authorities (permits, terms and conditions of employment) http://www.tyosuojelu.fi/fi/workingfinland/ the tax administration (combating the underground economy) http://www.vero.fi/enUS/Individuals/Arriving_in_Finland/Academic_studies_in_Fi nland%2817157%29
    • 45. Residence Permit    If you are a citizen of the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland you will not require a residence permit for Finland but you must register at local Police station after residing three months. Other nationalities can apply for a Finnish residence permit online prior to their arrival and then visit Embassy with their original documents and get the fingerprints: https://easiointi.migri.fi/eServices/FrontPage.aspx?ReturnUrl= %2feServices&lang=en If you intend to work in Finland, you need a residence permit based on employment, granted by the state of Finland. You need to visit Lappeenranta police station in person for this.
    • 46. Residence Permit      Apply during the time your permit granted for studies (B permit) in Finland is still valid. If you have studied and completed a degree or other qualifications in Finland, you may apply for a new residence permit based on the job you have gained. Your initial residence permit will be temporary based on your employment term. If you change an employer, you need apply for another residence permit. After living and working four years in Finland you can apply for permanent residence permit.
    • 47. Employment Contract  The employer and employee agree upon terms of employment in a work contract.  The contract should be in written form and contain at least the following: the name of the employer /enterprise, the name of the employee, the nature of the work, the starting date of the employment, the duration of the employment, the notice period, the trial period (max. 4 months), pay, and working hours.  Any agreement, which diminishes the rights and interests secured for employees in the labour legislation and/or the collective agreement, is void.
    • 48. Working Hours  Regular working hours are usually at most 8 daily hours and 40 weekly hours. In a two week period the working hours are not more than 80 hours and in a three week period 120 hours.  Each workplace must have a work schedule from which the workers’ regular working hours, beginning and ending times and the placement of the rest periods can be read.  Each workplace has their record keeping system for employees’ worked hours.  Employees should also keep their own record of their worked hours and received wages.
    • 49. Wages  There is no universal minimum wage in Finland. The collective agreement in most employment branches determines the pay and other minimum employment terms. It is also possible to agree on benefits such as food and residence in addition to the wage.  The wages in the collective agreements are determined according to the employee’s professional skills, experience and the geographical situation of the workplace (I and II cost regions).  You can ask about your place of employment’s collective unions and join one.
    • 50. Employees’ Rights     After working for the same employer for at least a month, employees have the right to receive sick-leave pay if they are unable to work during to illness or injury. To be entitled to sick-leave pay the working inability must be determined in a way satisfactory to the employer (for ex. a doctors certificate). Familiarise yourself with the collective agreement that applies to you. The employer must have an agreement of occupational health services with an occupational health service provider. A foreign employee working for a Finnish employer in Finland is to be insured by the employer with a mandatory accident insurance. The insurance covers both accidents at work and on the journey to work.
    • 51. Employees’ Rights  If the daily working time is at least 6 hours the employee is given a rest period of at least 30 minutes (lunch break).  Working hours exceeding the regular working hours are overtime hours. Overtime is compensated with additional, higher pay: for the first two daily hours of overtime normal pay is increased by 50% and for the following hours by 100 %. Sunday work is paid with doubled wages.  An employee has a right to receive pay also for the time he/she is on annual holiday. Normally holiday leave accumulates 2 days (when employment has lasted less than 1 year) or 2½ days for each holiday credit month. Normal wages are paid for the time an employee is on holiday.  More details at: http://www.tyosuojelu.fi/fi/workingfinland/
    • 52. Bank Account - Pankkitili   In Finland all wages are paid via a bank transfer Open an account in a local bank – Pankki if you have not yet  Passport or ID  Osuuspankki, Nordea, Danske pankki etc.
    • 53. Tax Card - Verokortti      Apply for a tax card with the tax office of your living area http://www.vero.fi/en-US http://www.vero.fi/enUS/Individuals/Arriving_in_Finland/Academic_studies_in_Finland %2817157%29 To use the internet service you need a bank account identity confirmation Kaakkois-Suomen verotoimisto Lappeenrannan toimipiste Postal address: PL 21, 53101 Lappeenranta Visiting address: Villimiehenkatu 2, Lappeenranta Telephone: 020 612 000 Fax: 020 613 6058  Open Monday-Friday at 9–16.15  From 1.2.2014 Open Monday – Friday at 9–15  Receipt of documentation Monday-Friday at 8–16.15
    • 54. Tax Card    Once you have a tax card, you take it to you employer Your employer deducts the taxes and social security payments from your income You will file a tax return form mailed to you in the beginning of the year by its indicated deadline.
    • 55. KELA-card       Apply for a Finnish KELA social security card Kansaneläkelaitos KELA http://www.kela.fi/web/en Holder of the card is entitled to use Finnish social security Local office: Toikankatu 4, 53100 LAPPEENRANTA (near central marketplace, Kauppatori) Opening hours: Monday – Friday: 9.00-16.00 Or make an appointment: www.kela.fi/appointments
    • 56. National Certificates of Language Proficiency (YKI) Finnish may be more or less required in your place of work. National Certificates of Language Proficiency are language proficiency tests intended for adults. They assess language skills in practical situations where adults may generally need to speak, listen, write or read in a foreign language – at home or abroad. You can use the certificate • to demonstrate language proficiency in a job application • to demonstrate language proficiency required for work assignments • as part of your studies • To demonstrate language proficiency required for acquisition of Finnish citizenship http://www.oph.fi/english/services/yki
    • 57. Working with Finns  Punctuality is very important to the Finns. Never be late for meetings, as this is considered very impolite in Finland. Be on time!  Diligence is expected. Follow your workhours strictly, ensure that you have some more hours than required.  Hard-working, determined people are esteemed, have some “Sisu”.  Finns keep their promises and expect others to do the same. Gain and keep trust!  Finnish society is very organized. Keep your work organized, follow your company’s requirements for timekeeping, recordkeeping, CRM-system, get the signatures when required.
    • 58. Working with Finns  Finnish people may at first come across as rude or quiet. They say things straightforward.  Finns are very honest. Dishonesty is the worst sin of all to the Finns. Remember to look Finns in the eye, looking down or to the side is a sign of dishonesty in Finland.  Conversation is informal and people usually refer to each other by their first names.  Finns mind their own business and respect other people’s privacy.  Finns prefer not to show their feelings in public.
    • 59. Working with Finns  Finnish people want to make the most of their time; planning ahead and sticking to agreed schedules.  If you do not understand something, be brave and ask about it! You will have fewer misunderstandings if you talk about things openly and honestly. Finns like details.  Finns are careful and gather background information in advance, but they make decisions quickly.  Power and responsibility are flexibly distributed. Men and women are equal.
    • 60. Working with Finns Conflicts should be solved by negotiation, seeking a result that is the best possible for all parties. Work in cooperation, help and you will be helped. Weekly meetings are typical, Finns like to move on with issues. Finns do not thank much. Go visit, communicate and ask for assistance if needed. If no question is asked, the audience has probably understood. Shake hands, don’t hug or kiss.
    • 61. Traffic Laws       Pedestrians do not cross the street if the light is not green even if there are no cars in sight A Finnish driving license can often be substituted for an existing foreign license: http://www.poliisi.fi/poliisi/home.nsf/pages/19279F910A6F1997C225 6C37002 D9F4B Everyone travelling in a car must wear a seatbelt There is a fine of 50 € for speaking to the mobile phone while driving You must use winter tiers from December till the end of February, typically used October – April
    • 62. Sauna        Finns go to the sauna with their family, their friends and even business partners and collegues. Important political and business negotiations are conducted in sauna. Going to a sauna in Finland, even without clothes, has nothing to do with sex – a sauna is a sacred place for the Finns. Typical sauna days are Wednesday & Saturday. Naked, towel allowed. Below 90 C is cool. You might be tested how long you last.
    • 63. Finnish Holidays       Vappu: Labour Day, May 1, white graduation caps, herring brunch/lunch Midsummer Fest, third weekend of June, bonfires Independence Day, December 6, Finns like to watch the President’s Ball on tv ”Pikkujoulut”: Little Christmas parties, extreme office parties Christmas Eve, December 24, ham & casseroles, quiet family celebration New Year, lively celebration with friends, tin horse shoes, sausages & potato salad, champagne & fireworks
    • 64. What did you learn today?  Look back at the intial note you wrote, did you already understand the Finns?  What is the most important thing you unlearned or learned today?
    • 65. Tips for Living in Finland  Finns warm slowly, nice surprises when you get to know them, friends for life.  When asked how you are, tell how you are, don’t say just fine.  SMS them: Finns like to do sms rather than talk.  Drink coffee: Finnish people drink coffee all the time everywhere, meetings usually begin with a cup of coffee.
    • 66. Few Good Words            Terve! – Hello! Hei! – Hi! Good Morning! – Hyvää huomenta! Good Afternoon! – Hyvää päivää! This is clear – selvä So – noniin Thank you - Kiitos Good bye! – Näkemiin! Hei hei! Toilet – vessa Where? – Missä? Cheers – Kippis! Hölökönkölökyn! Pohjanmaan kautta!
    • 67. Who are you in Finnish     Who am I in Finnish? How would your present yourself in Finnish? Think of a sentence how to positively and professionally introduce yourself to a potential employer. They will remember what you say!
    • 68. Ensure Positive Attitude       Focus on solutions; not the problems Believe in yourself and you abilities Display self-esteem & confidence Choose to be happy and have more energy Achieve your goals and succeed Inspire and motivate yourself and others
    • 69. How do I succeed in the World    I am genuinely interested in other people and their needs and communicate it clearly I listen and understand the spoken and unspoken words I remain in touch to carry out the discussed or promised activities
    • 70. Helpful Websites         http://www.suomi.fi/suomifi/english/index.html http://www.infopankki.fi/en-GB/important_authorities http://www.te-services.fi/te/en/pdf/workinginfinland.pdf www.visitfinland.com http://www.vero.fi/en-US http://www.intofinland.fi/en http://finland.fi/Public/default.aspx?contentid=160036 &nodeid=41797&culture=en-US
    • 71. Good Luck in Finland!  Thank You for Your Attention!  Keep in touch:    @MirkaKristiina FB: Mirka Kristiina Rahman mirkakristiina@gmail.com

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