MEEA’s Technical Webinar Series:Energy Efficiency Program Implementation Best Practices                     featuring EGIA...
MEEA’s Mission  MEEA is a collaborativenetwork advancing energy efficiency in the Midwest  to support sustainable  economi...
MEEA’s Role in the Midwest• Membership & Events• Energy Efficiency Policy Advocacy• Program Design & Implementation       ...
Upcoming Events & Important Dates     Early Bird Registration Deadline:              November 30th       www.meeaconferenc...
12-Step Roadmap toContractor Network Developmentand ManagementMidwest Energy Efficiency Alliance   Ed Thomas, EGIATechnica...
12-Step Roadmap ChronologyMonths 1-3                           Months 4-6                           Months 7-9Step 1 – Ide...
First Phase - Months 1-3   Identify   Educate   Prepare   Develop prospects to recruit
Step 1 - Identify Prospective Contractors toInvite Into Your Contractor Network   Firms/programs that already exist in ma...
Step 2 - Deliver Webinars On BusinessDevelopment Topics Topics to improve their business  profitability low-risk/low-cos...
Step 3 – Produce Contractor ExchangeWorkshop(s)   Focused 1-2 day workshop   Target owners and managers of residential  ...
Second Phase - Months 4-6   Enroll   Engage   Begin implementation   Work out the kinks
Step 4 – Conduct Program ParticipationWebinars/Workshops   Locations convenient to the target audiences   Record as webi...
Step 5 – Enroll & Screen ContractorsAll contractors should be requiredto pass screening process:  License, Insurance, Bon...
Step 6 – Establish Contractor Web PortalPassword access to:  Marketing tools  Co-branding logo requirements  FAQs  For...
Step 6 – Contractor Web Portal (cont.)    Training archive (webinars, workshop     handouts/presentations)    Reasons to...
Step 7 –Homeowner Web Portal List participating contractors  (ranked if possible) Incentive Availability    Customized ...
Step 7 – Homeowner Web Portal (cont.)   Personal Concierge/Coach        Prompt responses with “warm” transfer/referral  ...
Step 8 – Administer Incentives   Offer incentives choices:        Homeowner incentives         (performance/prescriptive...
Step 9 – Conduct Quality AssuranceTwo Main Parts:    Contractor Mentoring    Homeowner SurveysContractor Mentoring    F...
Step 9 – Conduct Quality AssuranceHomeowner Surveys    Telephone and email surveys for program      satisfaction and inte...
Third Phase - Months 7-9   Promote   Accelerate   Create continuous improvement   Position for “raising the bar”
Step 10 – Conduct Home EnergyMakeover Contest    Innovative way to shine a light that mimics     program    Modeled afte...
Step 11 – Produce Homeowner Workshops    Offer insight on energy savings and     other benefits    Put together homeowne...
Step 12 – Conduct Community Mentoring Create partnerships with experts and  new market entrants Improve energy efficienc...
12-Step Roadmap ChronologyMonths 1-3                           Months 4-6                           Months 7-9Step 1 – Ide...
Contact to Learn MoreTiger Adolf                            Ed ThomasWestern Regional Director              VP, Government...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

MEEA Technical Webinar: Energy Efficiency Program Implementation Best Practices featuring EGIA

867

Published on

In this MEEA technical webinar hear Ed Thomas of Electric & Gas Industries Association (EGIA) and Tiger Adolf of Building Performance Institute (BPI) discuss program implementation best practices for residential retrofit program managers to generate homeowner awareness, engage traditional and social media, recruit contractors to participate, motivate homeowners to take action, balance appeal of rebate vs. financing incentives, etc.
This presentation will provide an overview of a detailed roadmap that an energy efficiency program sponsor may follow for the establishment (or enhancement) of an engaged and qualified contractor network that will help homeowners install energy efficiency improvements in a manner consistent with national guidelines. Understand how utility and/or government incentives awarded to homeowners differ from incentives given to contractors.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
867
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • I would like to welcome everyone to MEEA’s technical webinar series. Today’s topic is Energy Efficiency Program Implementation Best Practices where are speakers Ed Thomas of EGIA and Tiger Adolf of BPI will discuss the steps needed to establish or enhance a contractor network.My name is Jared Wells with the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, I will begin by giving everyone a quick overview of MEEA and our role in the Midwest.Just some quick housekeeping notes before we get started. I have muted everyone's phones to cut down on background noise, we will have time for questions at the end of the presentation today, if you come up with a question during the presentation you may type it into the questions box located on the right side of your screen. Also, this webinar is being recorded and will be posted on our network for future viewing so if you do not agree, please disconnect now.
  • So now just a quick overview of MEEA.Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance or MEEA is based in Chicago, and we are active in the 13-state region you see to the right. We are a collaborative network advancing energy efficiency in the Midwest and have been around for just over 10 years.
  • So what is MEEA’s role in the MidwestWe have three main focus areas: First, we are a membership organization and currently have over 130 members from utilities, state energy offices, energy service firms, manufacturers and retailers, and academic institutions. We plan and host numerous events throughout the year including Thought Leadership roundtable discussions, and our annual Midwest Energy Solutions conference every January.We also advocate for stringent energy efficiency policy and energy codes in the Midwest by preparing legislative and regulatory analysis and building strong coalitions between diverse stakeholders in the region.And lastly, we administer, design, and implement various programs in the Midwest including Home performance programs, Lights for Learning, appliance recycling programs, emerging tech, Building Operators Certification, and HVAC trainingprograms.Here is our website if you are interested in finding out more about MEEA and any of the work we do.
  • And just one final plug for MEEA, our annual Midwest Energy Solutions Conference is taking place Jan 11-13 at the Fairmont Hotel in Chicago. The early bird registration deadline is November 30th. For more information or to register please visit meeaconference.org.That is all I have for my portion of the presentation so with that I will turn it to our presenter Ed Thomas of EGIA to go through the main presentation for today.
  • This roadmap presents the steps that a program sponsor may take toward establishing (or enhancing) a network of engaged and qualified contractors to help homeowners install energy efficiency improvements in a manner consistent with established guidelines in order to earn utility and/or government incentives.
  • The 12-step roadmap lays out a step-by-step chronology to build and maintain an engaged, professional contractor network.
  • Look for contractors who are already delivering services in your marketplace. You may look at your utility service territory or community/government boundaries to define your “market”. Identify those active contractors who have an established reputation for offering their services, even single-measure services, such HVAC, water heating, insulation, renewables, windows and energy efficient remodeling) who havedemonstrated interest and/or capability/capacity to deliver and scale for growth. These are important criteria to deliver services in a manner that meets program installation criteria.Avoid the temptation to create your own “jobs program” by training new market entrants or unemployed people to create prospective employees. Jobs created may be an important factor, but training inexperienced people who won’t get jobs, because the contractors don’t understand what you are trying to do in the first place, won’t achieve that. If contractors are growing and ready to hire and complaining they don’t have qualified candidates, then support the training prospective employees—but focus first on actual employees with the contractor. If you can get them to cooperate, the local Building Code Enforcement office or permitting office is a good place to get lists of busy, active contractors. We heard yesterday that it is hard to develop a good contractor network, and that is often because the program doesn’t allow for a viable business model for the contractors. A good initial step is creating a focus groups with stakeholders who are contractors and/or communicate regularly with contractors (such as the local contractor/builder/rater associations or related trades, the chamber, the product/equipment suppliers). Use these to find out some of the pain points and ambitions of your potential network. This group can be the foundation for a “contractor collaboration group” that can work with you on an on-going basis to develop and fine-tune programs, and improve viability .
  • Topics might be something like “Transforming Financial Statements into Management Tools”, but involves a topic on growing their businesses or increasing profitability. This provides you with a list of contractors that 1) understand the need for ongoing training, 2) are interested in growth and increased profitability, and 3) manage their time and crews sufficiently well that they can stop working long enough to watch a webinar. Record it, so if they are unable to attend, or realize they need other key staff to watch, it is available for them to access later. Also consider offering CEUs for various professional certifications. They have to provide you info on the certifications they hold, or at least who they are affiliated with—such as BPI, RESNET, NARI, etc. Very often business and marketing training qualifies for CEUs.
  • Now that they know you are providing some good information and are becoming accustomed to working with you, and you’ve had some time to gauge who is interested or not, hold a workshop – or more than one. Don’t make it all a “program orientation”. Expand on the topics that were in the webinar, make sure they have take away tools. Introduce them to some of the more successful contractors that are engaged in the business model you want to emulate. The contractor panel would be much like the panels here—avoid a lot of PowerPoint slides for the panels, and leave lots of time for interactive questions.Have utility and allies panels. That’s a good time to give a brief program “sneak peek”, so they think they are getting advance information. It also allows training and manufacturer allies a chance to show how they can help contractors take the next steps to reducing turnover, reducing callbacks, and increasing profits. Manufacturers and associations often like pre- or post-conference sessions to talk privately with the dealers or members to encourage them from a different industry perspective about the benefits of working with the program.
  • Set up a workshop for homeowners—it can be about improving comfort, reducing energy bills, improved home health, greening your home…whatever you want to call it. Before the homeowner workshop, do a short “booth training” for the contractors, to be sure they know how to leverage the event, collect leads, and capitalize on the opportunity. Encourage promotional support from local nonprofits, churches, clubs who have members that will benefit – let them have a table at the workshop. Charge a small fee for attendance so the homeowners have some skin in the game. Give each participating contractor company a booth space or table space where they can talk about their special areas of expertise, and a main area for the workshop to be held. Remember the workshop is about your contractors and demonstrating the best of the program. Set up topics on the items you want targeted in the program, identify some of your top performing contractors or the contractors that worked on the winning home, and put them on the agenda. 10-15 minutes is usually enough for a single contractor to talk about what they do or what their role was in the contest. If they are great presenters – they have 15 minutes! If they are scared, shaking, can’t run the slides – great – they only have 15 minutes! Offer to help prepare or review slides, but let them talk about what they know. Then encourage everyone to visit them at the booth to learn more.
  • Mentoring is so important. It provides not only on-going engagement with the contractors, but allows for continued professional growth, advanced learning in the field, real problem solving as a team. In a Community Energy Exchange model, an idea Stephen Self developed, they also do good for the community by actively addressing the energy, comfort, and health and safety needs of facilities used by particularly vulnerable groups. It provides ….
  • The 12-step roadmap lays out a step-by-step chronology to build and maintain an engaged, professional contractor network.
  • MEEA Technical Webinar: Energy Efficiency Program Implementation Best Practices featuring EGIA

    1. 1. MEEA’s Technical Webinar Series:Energy Efficiency Program Implementation Best Practices featuring EGIA Oct. 25th, 2011
    2. 2. MEEA’s Mission MEEA is a collaborativenetwork advancing energy efficiency in the Midwest to support sustainable economic development and environmental preservation.
    3. 3. MEEA’s Role in the Midwest• Membership & Events• Energy Efficiency Policy Advocacy• Program Design & Implementation www.mwalliance.org
    4. 4. Upcoming Events & Important Dates Early Bird Registration Deadline: November 30th www.meeaconference.org
    5. 5. 12-Step Roadmap toContractor Network Developmentand ManagementMidwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Ed Thomas, EGIATechnical Webinar Tiger Adolf, BPIOctober 25, 2011
    6. 6. 12-Step Roadmap ChronologyMonths 1-3 Months 4-6 Months 7-9Step 1 – Identify prospective Step 4 – Conduct Program Step 10 – Conduct Home Energycontractors/stakeholders to invite Participation Webinars/Workshop(s) Makeover Contestinto your contractor network Step 5 – Enroll and ScreenStep 2 – Deliver webinars on Interested Contractors for Program Step 11 – Produce Homeownerbusiness development topics Participation WorkshopsStep 3 – Produce Contractor Step 6 – Establish Contractor WebExchange workshop(s) Portal Step 12 – Conduct Community Energy Exchange Step 7 – Establish Homeowner Web Portal Step 8 – Administer Contractor and Homeowner Incentives Step 9 – Conduct Quality Assurance
    7. 7. First Phase - Months 1-3 Identify Educate Prepare Develop prospects to recruit
    8. 8. Step 1 - Identify Prospective Contractors toInvite Into Your Contractor Network Firms/programs that already exist in marketplace Those who have demonstrated capability/capacity to deliver/scale Prominent contractors BPI certified and accredited contractors (and EGIA, NATE, LEED, etc.) Past contractor participants in utility/government initiatives Avoid tendency to start with just new market entrants Outcome: Radical Inclusion
    9. 9. Step 2 - Deliver Webinars On BusinessDevelopment Topics Topics to improve their business profitability low-risk/low-cost way to reach compared to in-person meetings Attracts owners and key staff Record so they can view on-demand Offer CEUs Outcome: Align program withcontractors’ goals to grow business
    10. 10. Step 3 – Produce Contractor ExchangeWorkshop(s) Focused 1-2 day workshop Target owners and managers of residential and small commercial remodeling and replacement companies Panels with local experts and successful contractors “Advance preview” of your program Pre-/post events for utilities, agencies, non-profits, distributors Outcome: Contractor Community Engagement
    11. 11. Second Phase - Months 4-6 Enroll Engage Begin implementation Work out the kinks
    12. 12. Step 4 – Conduct Program ParticipationWebinars/Workshops Locations convenient to the target audiences Record as webinars for on-demand viewing Spotlight successful contractors Guest speakers from overlapping programs Program updates from utility sponsor Target enrolled contractors and let prospects “listen in” Be candid about what you are doing to fix what is not working Hang „em high Outcome: Initiate Dialogue
    13. 13. Step 5 – Enroll & Screen ContractorsAll contractors should be requiredto pass screening process:  License, Insurance, Bonding  Tax Compliance  Reference/Background Check  Certifications  Contractor ParticipationVerified annually/quarterly Goal: Set the Bar High
    14. 14. Step 6 – Establish Contractor Web PortalPassword access to:  Marketing tools  Co-branding logo requirements  FAQs  Forms  handbook/training manuals  work specifications, standards, guida nce Goal: One Stop Shop for Contractors
    15. 15. Step 6 – Contractor Web Portal (cont.) Training archive (webinars, workshop handouts/presentations) Reasons to come back:  Referrals to peer programs regionally  Business development allies  Available incentives/trainings  Economic/workforce development grant opportunities Key-account management with concierge-style service Goal: Ongoing Engagement
    16. 16. Step 7 –Homeowner Web Portal List participating contractors (ranked if possible) Incentive Availability  Customized program summaries and key contact Information  Related programs (links to tax credits, etc.) Contractor Referral  Note specializations and certifications
    17. 17. Step 7 – Homeowner Web Portal (cont.) Personal Concierge/Coach  Prompt responses with “warm” transfer/referral to contractor  Homeowner guide to interviewing contractors Rebate Assistance  Facilitate payment processing of ALL incentives Financing Referral  Reference ALL reputable resources for related projects Goal: Homeowner one-stop shop and resource center
    18. 18. Step 8 – Administer Incentives Offer incentives choices:  Homeowner incentives (performance/prescriptive rebates, loan interest rate buy downs)  Contractor-direct payments (training/equipment grants, cooperative marketing assistance) Streamline forms for easy processing Encourage online over snail mail Status updates online and via email On-demand reports to avoid surprises when program funding ends Goal: Reduce Admin Burden/Delays
    19. 19. Step 9 – Conduct Quality AssuranceTwo Main Parts:  Contractor Mentoring  Homeowner SurveysContractor Mentoring  Feedback and open communication are essential  Clear standards – share forms in advance  Qualified inspectors – people who are certified and experienced  Try to schedule QA inspections with job completion/test-out – use as mentoring Goal: Document Contractor Success Stories
    20. 20. Step 9 – Conduct Quality AssuranceHomeowner Surveys  Telephone and email surveys for program satisfaction and interest in other programs  Document energy efficiency achieved (direct or indirect)  Mine surveys as case study resources  Capture program savings benefits that might otherwise go “unclaimed” by EM&VHomeowner assessments of contractorperformance should be integrated intocontractor mentoring – plan for continuousimprovement Goal: Document Homeowner Success Stories
    21. 21. Third Phase - Months 7-9 Promote Accelerate Create continuous improvement Position for “raising the bar”
    22. 22. Step 10 – Conduct Home EnergyMakeover Contest Innovative way to shine a light that mimics program Modeled after reality television shows Take B.S. approach to select home that best demonstrates potential for energy savings Products and services donated by participating contractors Media & VIPs invited to tour winning homes Winning home owners make compelling case to traditional/social media All about “losers” learning how to conduct their own energy makeover Goal: Engage Community To Demo Program Success
    23. 23. Step 11 – Produce Homeowner Workshops  Offer insight on energy savings and other benefits  Put together homeowners with contractors and get the heck outta the way  Agenda sessions should feature winning homeowners with contractors who worked on their homes.  Teach contractors how to sell and homeowners how to buy Goal: Champion Early Adopter Contractors and Homeowners
    24. 24. Step 12 – Conduct Community Mentoring Create partnerships with experts and new market entrants Improve energy efficiency and safety of community buildings Learn and apply building science in- the-field and on-the-job mentoring New market entrants gain experience in real-world buildings Goal: Mentor New Market Entrants
    25. 25. 12-Step Roadmap ChronologyMonths 1-3 Months 4-6 Months 7-9Step 1 – Identify prospective Step 4 – Conduct Program Step 10 – Conduct Home Energycontractors/stakeholders to invite Participation Webinars/Workshop(s) Makeover Contestinto your contractor network Step 5 – Enroll and ScreenStep 2 – Deliver webinars on Interested Contractors for Program Step 11 – Produce Homeownerbusiness development topics Participation WorkshopsStep 3 – Produce Contractor Step 6 – Establish Contractor WebExchange workshop(s) Portal Step 12 – Conduct Community Energy Exchange Step 7 – Establish Homeowner Web Portal Step 8 – Administer Contractor and Homeowner Incentives Step 9 – Conduct Quality Assurance
    26. 26. Contact to Learn MoreTiger Adolf Ed ThomasWestern Regional Director VP, Government and Utility AffairsBuilding Performance Institute, Inc. Electric & Gas Industries Association518.951.0666 970.209.8347tadolf@bpi.org ethomas@egia.orgwww.bpi.org www.egia.org
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×