Strategic CSRPresented by:Paul Salinger, President, GMIC/VP, OracleMidori Connolly, Chief AVGirl,Pulse Staging and Events
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)The responsibility of anorganization for the impacts ofits decisions and activities o...
People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights•...
People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights•...
People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights•...
Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity a...
Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity a...
Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity a...
Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect ec...
Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect ec...
Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect ec...
Triple Bottom Line: The Balance                                  7
Strategic CSR                8
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9
Strategic CSR
Strategic CSR                Organization
Strategic CSR                Organization                            i  ty                          un                    ...
Strategic CSR            En  Organization                             i ty              vi                           un   ...
Strategic CSR            En  Organization                             i ty              vi                           un   ...
Strategic CSR            En  Organization                             i ty              vi                           un   ...
Identify points of intersection                          SOCIETY                    COMPANY
SMMP - STRATEGIC MEETINGSMANAGEMENT PROGRAM and CSR
Strategic Meetings Management Process                (SMMP) An overarching plan that aligns an organization’s meetings wit...
STEP 1 Conduct Internal Analysis
STEP 2 Identify Core Competencies
Do you know yourmission statement?What about core values,specific initiatives,business goals?                     Activity ...
STEP 3 Draft Preliminary Meetings CSR Policyhttp://bit.ly/greenmeetingspolicy
STEP 6 Define Success Measures
Identifying Key Metrics                   Activity 2                          19
STEP 4 Identify Stakeholders
StakeholderEngagement              Activity 3                     21
STEP 5 Identify Tools
STEP 7 Implement Strategy
CSR and COST SAVINGS
2Activity: Discussionon CSR Cost Savings
$1.5M
594,000liters of water 36,900kg of carbon dioxide   6,750kg of oil745,000megajoules of energy
-32-18,000 -800
$135,000 Recycled Signage
Saved   965 Trees
100Tons of Waste
Some Positive ResultsBSR Conference - Conference Management100% energy offset for travel and meeting space.11,780 pounds o...
A more sustainable conference management saved:US$   15,000 by not printing invitation programsUS$   18,000 by not printin...
Hilton Worldwide LightStayMore than $74M in savings as a result of:a   19 percent reduction in waste,a   7.8 percent drop ...
Strategic CSR for Meetings and Events
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Strategic CSR for Meetings and Events

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This session is a compilation of interactive exercises exploring the connection between business strategy and sustainability for a meetings and events manager. Also approaches the concept of integrating a strategic sustainability plan into a Strategic Meetings Management Program (SMMP).

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  • A green/sustainable event incorporates environmental and social considerations throughout all stages of the meeting process in order to minimize the negative impact on the environment and make a positive contribution to host communities. \n
  • MPI defines Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as the responsibility of an organization for the impacts of its decisions and activities on society, the environment and its own prosperity.\n-In other words, it is an enduring, balanced approach to economic activity, environmental responsibility and social progress\n
  • -CSR is often referred to as the “Triple Bottom Line” of People, Planet and Profit a phrase coined by John Elkington in 1994 and then expanded in his 1998 book Cannibals with Forks: the Triple Bottom Line of 21st Century Business\n-It captures the idea that value comes not only from financial profit but also from a consideration of the social and environmental impact\n-The aim of CSR is to ensure long-term sustainability of the organization; there must be profit but also sustainable economic benefit\n
  • Let’s review in more detail what we mean by People/Social considerations\n\nThis list comes from the soon-to-be-launched international event sustainability standard, ISO 20121. While you may not be familiar with all of these terms, let me give you an easy summary of what we’re referring to here: fair practices concerning labor, community outreach, social well-being and equity.\n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-(click) Community Volunteer Programs that engage event attendees in activities that give back to the community where the meeting is being held \n-(click) Health and Wellness programs that emphasize the attendee’s mind, body and spirit, such as offering healthy food and morning yoga\n
  • Let’s review in more detail what we mean by People/Social considerations\n\nThis list comes from the soon-to-be-launched international event sustainability standard, ISO 20121. While you may not be familiar with all of these terms, let me give you an easy summary of what we’re referring to here: fair practices concerning labor, community outreach, social well-being and equity.\n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-(click) Community Volunteer Programs that engage event attendees in activities that give back to the community where the meeting is being held \n-(click) Health and Wellness programs that emphasize the attendee’s mind, body and spirit, such as offering healthy food and morning yoga\n
  • Next, let’s review what we mean by Planet/Environmental considerations. Essentially it refers to practices that protect our environment and conserve resources. \n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-(click) green meetings, which as defined by the Convention Industry Council incorporate environmental considerations to minimize their negative impact on the environment\n-(click) measuring your event carbon footprint, defined as the total set of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused directly or indirectly by your event Source: Wikipedia\n
  • Next, let’s review what we mean by Planet/Environmental considerations. Essentially it refers to practices that protect our environment and conserve resources. \n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-(click) green meetings, which as defined by the Convention Industry Council incorporate environmental considerations to minimize their negative impact on the environment\n-(click) measuring your event carbon footprint, defined as the total set of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused directly or indirectly by your event Source: Wikipedia\n
  • Finally, let’s review what we mean by Profit/Economic Considerations. As I mentioned earlier, of the three pillars of sustainability, this is often the most difficult for audiences to grasp since many people assume CSR is about environmental and/or social considerations only. Essentially, what we’re talking about here is financial prosperity and continuity, innovation and return on investment.\n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-ROI methodology which measures the value of the meetings and events that we produce\n-Strategic Meetings Management Program (SMMP), which is a focus on enterprise-wide meeting related processes, spend, volumes, standards and suppliers to achieve quantitative cost-savings, risk mitigation and superior service\n
  • Finally, let’s review what we mean by Profit/Economic Considerations. As I mentioned earlier, of the three pillars of sustainability, this is often the most difficult for audiences to grasp since many people assume CSR is about environmental and/or social considerations only. Essentially, what we’re talking about here is financial prosperity and continuity, innovation and return on investment.\n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-ROI methodology which measures the value of the meetings and events that we produce\n-Strategic Meetings Management Program (SMMP), which is a focus on enterprise-wide meeting related processes, spend, volumes, standards and suppliers to achieve quantitative cost-savings, risk mitigation and superior service\n
  • Finally, let’s review what we mean by Profit/Economic Considerations. As I mentioned earlier, of the three pillars of sustainability, this is often the most difficult for audiences to grasp since many people assume CSR is about environmental and/or social considerations only. Essentially, what we’re talking about here is financial prosperity and continuity, innovation and return on investment.\n\nHere are a few Meeting industry examples: \n-ROI methodology which measures the value of the meetings and events that we produce\n-Strategic Meetings Management Program (SMMP), which is a focus on enterprise-wide meeting related processes, spend, volumes, standards and suppliers to achieve quantitative cost-savings, risk mitigation and superior service\n
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  • Of course, we all recognize that today’s economy is very different than that of a few years ago. At that time there was a great buzz about climate change and CSR and the new economic context makes many question the goals that were outlined previously. So today, we’re going to look at CSR from a strategic context: how it can help your organization achieve greater success than without it. \n
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  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • What is strategic CSR?\n\nIf you walk away with nothing else today, this is what I want you to remember. (Thanks Elizabeth George!)\n\nAt its most fundamental level, it is the point of intersection between the needs of your organization or meeting, those of the environment and those of society. On the slide you can see the dark green triangle at the centre of the diagram. This is the home of strategic CSR; at this point, the needs of society and your environmental goals (as well as the environmental goals of our world community) intersect with the needs of your organization to make a difference to all three.\n
  • First step is to identify points of intersection between your company and society\n
  • Next, let’s look at how SMMP – Strategic Meetings Management Program – interacts with CSR.\n
  • First, let’s define SMMP: An overarching plan that aligns an organization's meetings with its mission, vision, landscape and culture. \n\nMPI’s Global Corporate Circle of Excellence outlined the steps in a strategic meetings management process. The same steps apply for incorporating CSR into meetings. \n
  • Step 1: It starts at the internal level. In order to craft a strategic CSR program for your organization, you need to be familiar with the vision, mission, strategic plan, values, culture and business goals and objectives so these can be supported and enhanced by any activities that are developed in the community or communicated to stakeholders at your meetings and events. This will help define the strategic relevance of the meetings function.\n
  • Step 2: It is important to assess how your strengths as meeting professionals can bring CSR to life in your organization or for your clients and other stakeholders. \n-Identify your core meeting professional competencies and objectives and how they support overall organizational CSR strategy. \n-Identify stakeholders to consult for buy-in of your planned activities.\n \nRecognize that every organization will be different, in terms of ability, focus and organizational mandate.\n
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  • Step 3: Draft a preliminary meetings and CSR proposal/policy that supports your organization’s strategic plan. Consult with partners/stakeholders for validation. Ask them to help define how the meetings/events function can help support their goals and satisfy stakeholder interests. For example, The War for Talent internally.\n\nIn including CSR initiatives in this proposal, remember to keep in mind that it will need to respond to business questions, and being able to quantify information will support the narrative. It might include:\n\nAn executive summary of key points\n-An explanation of why the proposal is important to your company\n-Identification of short- and long-term financial, environmental and social impacts (both internal and external to the organization) impacts\n-A list of current policies and procedures and a glimpse at how they may evolve\n-A communication plan articulating how you recommend to roll out the program to stakeholders\n-An evaluation plan that will help you measure the program’s success\n\nIn a few minutes we’ll be looking at a framework that will make this part straightforward. If you’re not ready for a complete implementation of the SMMP, the TOWS Matrix can be used to help integrate CSR in that context.\n
  • Step 6: Defining success measures allows you to track success. Engage with your stakeholders\nStaff\nAttendees\nVolunteers\nSuppliers\nSponsors\nPartners\nto help define the objectives for your event. \n\nEg. British Standard BS 8901 requires organizations to complete this process as part of certification.\n
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  • Step 4: Identify types of external partners to facilitate contracts and supply chain management. \n\nThe actions of your suppliers reflect on your organization and your meeting. In selecting and negotiating with your suppliers, ensure that they support your goals and objectives in respect to CSR. Failure to do so runs the risk of damaging your reputation. Think of the problem Nike had with sweatshop labour in the 1990s.\n\nPlanners and suppliers alike in the meetings industry have the ability to increase the impact of their CSR initiatives through implementing supply chain practices that support their vision. Audit your potential supply chain by asking for information including:\n-Product quality and availability\n-CSR programs currently in place\n-Environmental policies\n-Any measurement and reports\n-Do they source materials sustainably?\n\nIf you are within a large corporation, your procurement department may be your biggest internal partner in vetting and creating partnerships within the supply chain.\n
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  • Step 5: Identify appropriate technological tools for data collection, reporting and analysis. Now that there is a policy in place, how will you measure your success? What tools are available to you? Can you use available technology, such as a simple spreadsheet, or are their more advanced tools you wish to use? What is the best match for your organization, or what is readily available within your organization?\n
  • Step 7: Implement your strategy, review and revise based on attainment of success measures and how successfully they support the needs of the stakeholders\n\nThe implementation and review process is essential to integrating strategic CSR within the meetings and events function.  This allows you to adjust strategy locally based on how well the needs of the stakeholders are being met.  This should be a 360 evaluation, taking into account not only internal stakeholders but identified external stakeholders.  There is a school of thought that advocates that “CSR” should actually stand for “Corporate Stakeholder Responsibility”, they view this as so essential to the process.  It allows a greater opportunity to innovate not only internally, but within your supply chain to create value locally.  It may enhance your competitive ability, and creates goodwill within your stakeholder community.  \n
  • Note: this section could be expanded into multiple slides.\n\nOne area we need to consider in light of today’s economy is the aspect of cost. Many may decide to put CSR “on hold” thinking that the costs are too high, when in fact, a number can provide important cost savings.\n\nLet’s look at a number of key areas:\n\nCATERING: \n-Rely on your chef to select local, in season foods.\n-Reduce portion sizes or skip the dessert.\n-Reduce the number of items on a buffet – it will help the kitchen forecast better and reduce waste.\n-Opt for a wellness break instead of a traditional coffee and cookie break. Offer fresh, whole local fruit, herbal teas, and water refill stations. Consider bringing in someone to provide instruction on something that would appeal to your audience and revitalize them such as stretching, meditation or music. \n-Reduce food waste by cross-checking your confirmed numbers to your hotel pickup or by collecting information on meals that delegates will attend via their registration.\n\nTRANSPORTATION:\n-Encourage walking between venues and include activities along the way for your delegates, possibly hiring local performers.\n-Have delegates sign up for shuttle times to reduce the number of buses required and increase the number of people on each trip.\n\nMATERIALS:\n-Avoid shipping things back that are branded for a specific event. Consider repurposing them locally (such as donating bags and notepads to a school) or not making them event specific so you can use remaining items for your next program.\n-Give away fewer, but better quality items that are not only reusable, but that people will want to reuse.\n\nPROGRAMMING\n-Hire local or student entertainment.\n-Partner with another event in your city to bring in speakers that appeal to both groups. It will save you costs and reduce the carbon footprint.\n\nMARKETING\n-Get involved in the community or professional associations. Support workplace volunteering that demonstrates your commitment and raises awareness of your product or services.\n-Clean your data. Working with an up to date client list will reduce your mailing and printing costs. Remember to watch for duplicates!\n-Use print materials to drive people to your website where you can have more details. Reduce or eliminate print brochures and conference guides\n\nDÉCOR\n-Donate an art budget to a school and ask them to create centerpieces for your event.\n-If you are ordering fresh flowers, request local and in season varieties or purchase trees that can be planted.\n\nSTAFFING DURING DOWN TIMES:\n-Encourage staff members to propose reduced work hours that support their lifestyle such as allowing them to be home after school, participate in team sports or take a course.\n-Promote that you are willing to grant unpaid leave time, such as extended parental or study leaves. Recognize that employees may not ask for this, but may appreciate it if offered.\n-Book during off peak times. This supports the local economy and saves you money.\n-Talk with your partners and get to know how together you can make responsible choices that support the triple bottom line of people, planet and profit.\n
  • Suggested activity: Discussion on CSR Cost Savings \n\nAsk the audience to share examples about how implementing CSR activities has saved their organization money. This can be done at the table or with the larger audience, depending on the level of experience/knowledge.\n
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  • Sustainability has become a competitive factor among the hospitality industry's biggest brands and several have stepped up their efforts to make their operations and their offerings more environmentally friendly.\n\nFor example, Hyatt launched its Thrive program this past summer. Marriott, which is working to make its supply chain and properties greener, has teamed with flooring and fabric companies and other firms to form the Hospitality Sustainable Purchasing Consortium.\n\nHilton Worldwide developed a sustainability management system about three years ago and recently detailed the latest environmental benefits and savings from its program, called LightStay. They amount to more than $74 million in savings as a result of a 19 percent reduction in waste, a 7.8 percent drop in carbon emissions, a 6.6 percent decrease in energy use and 3.8 percent reduction in water consumption.\n\nHilton, which is working with other hospitality giants to devise a carbon footprint standard for their industry, is claiming a further environmental achievement that its executives say set the brand apart.\n
  • Strategic CSR for Meetings and Events

    1. 1. Strategic CSRPresented by:Paul Salinger, President, GMIC/VP, OracleMidori Connolly, Chief AVGirl,Pulse Staging and Events
    2. 2. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)The responsibility of anorganization for the impacts ofits decisions and activities onsociety, the environment andits own prosperity.
    3. 3. People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights• Cultural issues• Accessibility• Equity• Heritage• Religious sensitivities(Per ISO 20121)
    4. 4. People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights• Cultural issues• Accessibility• Equity• Heritage• Religious sensitivities(Per ISO 20121)
    5. 5. People = Social• Labour standards• Health and Safety• Civil liberties• Social Justice• Local community• Indigenous Rights• Cultural issues• Accessibility• Equity• Heritage• Religious sensitivities(Per ISO 20121)
    6. 6. Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity and nature preservation• Releases to land, water and air
    7. 7. Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity and nature preservation• Releases to land, water and air
    8. 8. Planet = Environmental• Resource utilization• Materials choice• Resource conservation• Emissions reduction• Biodiversity and nature preservation• Releases to land, water and air
    9. 9. Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect economic impact• Market presence• Economic performance• Risk• Fair Trade• Profit sharing
    10. 10. Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect economic impact• Market presence• Economic performance• Risk• Fair Trade• Profit sharing
    11. 11. Profit = Economic• Return on Investment (ROI)• Local economy• Market capacity• Shareholders value• Innovation• Indirect economic impact• Market presence• Economic performance• Risk• Fair Trade• Profit sharing
    12. 12. Triple Bottom Line: The Balance 7
    13. 13. Strategic CSR 8
    14. 14. 9
    15. 15. 9
    16. 16. Strategic CSR
    17. 17. Strategic CSR Organization
    18. 18. Strategic CSR Organization i ty un m m Co
    19. 19. Strategic CSR En Organization i ty vi un ro m nm m en Co t
    20. 20. Strategic CSR En Organization i ty vi un ro m nm m en Co t
    21. 21. Strategic CSR En Organization i ty vi un ro m nm m en Co t
    22. 22. Identify points of intersection SOCIETY COMPANY
    23. 23. SMMP - STRATEGIC MEETINGSMANAGEMENT PROGRAM and CSR
    24. 24. Strategic Meetings Management Process (SMMP) An overarching plan that aligns an organization’s meetings with its mission, vision, landscape and culture.
    25. 25. STEP 1 Conduct Internal Analysis
    26. 26. STEP 2 Identify Core Competencies
    27. 27. Do you know yourmission statement?What about core values,specific initiatives,business goals? Activity 1 16
    28. 28. STEP 3 Draft Preliminary Meetings CSR Policyhttp://bit.ly/greenmeetingspolicy
    29. 29. STEP 6 Define Success Measures
    30. 30. Identifying Key Metrics Activity 2 19
    31. 31. STEP 4 Identify Stakeholders
    32. 32. StakeholderEngagement Activity 3 21
    33. 33. STEP 5 Identify Tools
    34. 34. STEP 7 Implement Strategy
    35. 35. CSR and COST SAVINGS
    36. 36. 2Activity: Discussionon CSR Cost Savings
    37. 37. $1.5M
    38. 38. 594,000liters of water 36,900kg of carbon dioxide 6,750kg of oil745,000megajoules of energy
    39. 39. -32-18,000 -800
    40. 40. $135,000 Recycled Signage
    41. 41. Saved 965 Trees
    42. 42. 100Tons of Waste
    43. 43. Some Positive ResultsBSR Conference - Conference Management100% energy offset for travel and meeting space.11,780 pounds of waste diverted from landfill.100% organic coffee offered.Live Earth76% diversion of event waste from landfill.Canada Media Marketplace72% of all menus sourced within 100 miles of the meetingdestination.$4750 of materials donated to local charities post-event.Unitarian Universalist Association General AssemblyLess than 1.5 lbs of trash per event attendee for this 3500-personevent!Improved to providing menus with 31% certified organic content.Reduced paper use to save 26 trees, and $6000 against budget.Compliments of and Source - MeetGreen
    44. 44. A more sustainable conference management saved:US$ 15,000 by not printing invitation programsUS$ 18,000 by not printing general information bookletsUS$ 20,000 by printing abstract books only upon orderUS$ 500,000 by not providing shuttleUS$ 50,000 by not having to buy water for delegatesTOTAL SAVED compared to previous congresses: US$ 603,000
    45. 45. Hilton Worldwide LightStayMore than $74M in savings as a result of:a 19 percent reduction in waste,a 7.8 percent drop in carbon emissions,a 6.6 percent decrease in energy usea 3.8 percent reduction in water consumption.Intel Developer ForumBy reducing the paper materials distributed saved more than eight tons ofpaper3,100 pounds of perishable food donated to Food Runners, a local foodbank.IDF has saved $200,000 by eliminating bottled water and reducing foodwaste.

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