Migration To Innovation
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Migration To Innovation

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Corporate inertia is commonplace everywhere, but business goals are still the key to having innovation be constructive and not just disruptive. The problem is for the company to learn to construct ...

Corporate inertia is commonplace everywhere, but business goals are still the key to having innovation be constructive and not just disruptive. The problem is for the company to learn to construct itself with innovations. The strategy is about migrating to the future.

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Migration To Innovation Migration To Innovation Presentation Transcript

  • Migration to Innovation Planning the adaptation to the New An archestra notebook. © 2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • MIGRATION TO INNOVATION Information Technology is the “vehicle” driven by the business in its pursuit of operational impacts that create opportunities, grow gains from interactions, and maintain positions of advantage and readiness over time. Increasingly, market conditions point to the need for identifying innovations that change operations, leaving them running in ways no longer constrained by the support mechanisms of a previous generation – mechanisms including the modes of technology acquisition, configuration, distribution and maintenance. The key to capitalizing on innovations begins with an adequate awareness of the business requirements (goals) that should be affected. However, the actual efficacy of innovations is dependent on absorbing them into routine, rather than tending to them indefinitely as exceptions. For innovations to be creatively constructive instead of surprisingly disruptive, a capability for strategic adaptations must be pursued even more than the particular innovations themselves. Otherwise, the result is more highly probable to result in wasted opportunity than in advantageous progress. Operations themselves must migrate, through adaptation, to the future offered by innovations. Migration planning is the critical prerequisite. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • Innovations tend to cycle through different levels and phases of production and provision. New innovations may revisit and revise foundation work, alter intermediary delivery methods, or reformulate the packaged scope of functionality that touches the end-user who requests access and support. Because the ongoing introductions of innovations occur in a scope largely independent of the decisions of any one company, IT operations for business must include a research function that continually discovers and assesses upcoming and maturing offers – in terms of their probable relevance to adaptation plans, not just to future business goals. The overview of issues includes decisions that expand or relocate facilities and user access to the functionality of IT operations: - Translations that provide a same given functionality to different local users - Transformations that alter the users’ supported portfolio of options in ways to execute functionality - Transpositions that take functionality and redeploy it on a new baseline foundation - Implementation that minimizes redundancy and waste of resources - Integration that fortifies compatibilities while avoiding and eliminating complications - Instrumentation that signals the relevant conditions for determining whether a deployment’s alignment to, and retention for, given business requirements is satisfactory Understanding the importance and current state of these issues, the company can make better decisions on how to divide responsibilities amongst producers and providers, keeping them mapped to an iterative plan for continuing forward progress. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra View slide
  • Operating your vehicle – a car – provides a point of view on identifying how the vehicle itself must combine what appears to be a small number of major functions, and the support of those functions, to allow a sustainable balance of usability and progress. The support of the functions is structural, and the functions themselves must be manageable in operation. PROPULSION NAVIGATION CONTROL Power supply Steering TRACTION Accelerator Clutch It is almost unimaginable that one could predictably benefit from depending on a vehicle in which any two, or usually even any one, of the four key functions was dysfunctional or missing. This same realization corresponds directly to the objectives (below) of the managed business technologies solution – which is serving as the vehicle for growth and relationship management through business operations. We can see the major characteristics needed of the provided operational capability. The task is to map a transition to these states. LONG-TERM COST SEVICE DIVERSITY PROCESS MODULARITY Pay-as-you-go Fast realignment to requirements SCALABILITY Expand to demand level Critical mass @ point of demand ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra View slide
  • This perspective on the overall technology “vehicle” for business sees the company pursuing basic operational platforms, options for the platform, and agility in applying the options to address the two big realities of operations: simultaneous variety, and continual change. The result of this is an ongoing struggle to attain adequate stability without rigidity – and to sustain that profile over time. In this picture, process modules are options, and their discretionary application provides the diversity of capability needed by the business. The usual challenge to the integrity of the “vehicle” is in the alignment of process modularity vs. scalability, and in the alignment of cost vs. diversity. The need for scale puts pressure on the completeness and cooperation of process modules; and diversity increases the complexity and/or unpredictability of costs. These two pairs of problems must be solved, which means that the associated objectives in each pair must be tackled with awareness of each other, and those objectives must eventually be achieved (in hand) at the same time. LONG-TERM COST SCALABILITY PROCESS MODULARITY Justification and prioritization of need Robustness of operational modules SEVICE DIVERSITY Control of proliferation Continuity and flexibility of support Likewise, the drivability of the vehicle – the matters of where it can go and for how long – is rooted in resolving the alignment of process modularity vs. cost, and in the alignment of service diversity vs. scalability. The value of the vehicle is compromised by including options that are unnecessary or that increase the complication of operations, as they add burden that need not exist yet still is being paid for. Meanwhile, if the strength of the feature under real-world demand is unreliable, then its availability actually encourages risk-taking that literally can result in counter-productivity if not damage and danger. Consequently, these two pairs of problems also must be solved, handling the factors within each pair in tandem. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • LONG-TERM COST SCALABILITY PROCESS MODULARITY Justification and prioritization of need Robustness of operational modules SEVICE DIVERSITY Control of proliferation Continuity and flexibility of support Against those circumstances, a lightweight scan of IT developments over the last ten years shows numerous relevant offerings that have occurred, in particular for increasing the modularity and diversity of processing with managed sustainability. They have been introduced at an industrial, commercial or local company’s inhouse level of effort and impact – appearing most often separately, but whereupon they have been aggregated and blended in various ways. Each offering has potentially been an enabler of improved business operations. When a company takes steps to adopt the offerings, it aims for overcoming prior operational limitations. However, too frequently the attraction of a new and different offering is not seen clearly enough in terms of the challenge it may present – changing from the current state to the target state. The basic idea of the change is that the company will move beyond its own legacy in-house foundation to acquire ability comparable to the basis provided in commercial scope or industrial scale. For the most part, resolving modularity and scalability calls for several types of conversions to be planned, having architectural impact; whereas, resolving cost and diversity requires various kinds of installations to be orchestrated, having IT asset lifecycle impact. In the following information, a few of the most basic motivations fueling IT operations are overlaid with examples of innovations having related benefits. The relevancy demonstrates that the motivations are sensible, addressable and attractive to innovators. The takeaway from the comparisons is that organizations should anticipate the need for certain types of managed changes in order to exploit current and future innovations. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • Reconciling Modularity and Scale For the most part, resolving modularity and scalability calls for several types of conversions to be planned, having architectural impact. Designers, Builders, and Suppliers of IT-based functionality are all sources acting as a Producer. These producers face the problem of efficiently covering the scope and reach of business process requirements. Their efficiency begins with producing the functionality in deliverable and reusable form. Modularity is the strategy that brings reuse and delivery into the picture as the rule instead of as the exception. Industrial-level design affects both commercial suppliers and In-house organizations acting as builders. Suppliers, whether their own used designs are proprietary or industry-standard, create convenience for inhouse organizations by reducing the time-to-coverage for certain scopes of requirements. But the in-house organization, adopting industrial or commercial offerings, then adapts its own responsibility as a Provider by making changes for addressing three kinds of diversity: - Translations that provide a same given functionality to different local users - Transformations that alter the users’ supported portfolio of options in ways to execute functionality - Transpositions that take functionality and redeploy it on a new baseline foundation These three efforts are neither mutually exclusive, nor is it necessary to pursue them independently of each other. However, a general historical trend of their use shows a gradual progression towards more industrial production. A more specific view is that any in-house holding may be subject to any of the several types of changes at any time. In the big trend, industrial approaches aim to make the supplier and builder issues at least less difficult if not less necessary. For example, industrial solutions tend to provide designs that have the scalability of deployment already built-into the module (scope) of functionality. In effect, all three types of change tend to wind up contained within the useful options provided by progressively newer industrial solutions. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • better Industrial platform Commercial platform In-house platform Increasing business scalability Mobility Hosting EXTEND ACCESS FOR BROADER AUDIENCES & REDUNDANCY Duplicate information and functionality at another location Translate worse MIX DELIVERY CHANNELS TO ACHIEVE VERSATILITY OF REACH Modify and Increase range of access types to current processing Transform Appliances MIGRATE DELIVERY OPERATIONS TO MORE ROBUST FOUNDATION Provide functionality through new primary channels Cloud Transpose Virtualization For producers, re-use and delivery are key issues underlying scope and reach in covering requirements… Increasing operational process modularity lower higher ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • Reconciling Cost and Diversity For the most part, resolving cost and diversity requires various kinds of installations to be orchestrated, having IT asset lifecycle impact. Designers, Builders, and Suppliers of IT-based functionality are also all sources acting as a Provider. These providers face the problem of economically covering the range and change of business process requirements. Their economy begins with providing the functionality in manageable and replaceable form. Availability is the strategy that brings replacement and manageability into the picture as the rule instead of as the exception. In general, Providers create convenience for in-house organizations by reducing the time-to-deployment and providing “service levels” for certain fulfillments of requirements. But the in-house organization, adopting industrial or commercial offerings, then adapts its own responsibility as a Provider by instituting affordable procedures for addressing three dimensions of installation: - Implementation that minimizes redundancy and waste of resources - Integration that fortifies compatibilities while avoiding and eliminating complications - Instrumentation that signals the relevant conditions for determining whether a deployment’s alignment to, and retention for, given business requirements is satisfactory Again, in the big picture of general trends, industrial approaches aim to make the supplier and builder issues at least less difficult if not less necessary. For example, industrial solutions tend to provide features that have the manageability of installations already built-into the diversity (range) of functionality. In effect, all three types of Provider procedures tend to wind up contained within the useful options provided by progressively newer industrial solutions. ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • lower better Availability of I.T. service diversity Industrial platform In-house platform worse Captive long-term business cost Open Source Commercial platform higher SOA Cloud Open Stack SUBSCRIBE OPERATIONS Access business process capability on as-needed basis Outsourcing ASSEMBLE PROCESSES FOR OPERATIONS Provide operational abilities as modules Instrument Integrate Agile BUILD UTILITIES FOR PROCESSES Maintain facility as store for localized functions Virtualization For providers, replacement and manageability are key issues underlying range and change in covering requirements… Implement ©2013 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  • For IT providers, today’s most prominent example of a target innovation is cloud computing. Migrations to the cloud readily expose the main problem pairs of meeting new and varied requirements affordably, and achieving necessary scale in manageable chunks. The cost of satisfying new needs quickly enough is easily the major constraint on competitive growth, and the ability to sustain the impact of a newly introduced solution quickly becomes the key constraint on operational health. As a result, long-term commitments to the cloud start out with infrastructure risk management, and short-term commitments start out with software service level management. But both commitments must be kept at the same time. When companies optimize and rationalize their IT infrastructure and offerings, its resulting modularity offers the correct basis for re-launching operations through the expansive reach of cloud architecture. Where this step has been taken, the capacity is more highly available to support immediate delivery of differing services at levels of performance that are compelling for parties with a high-enough need. Identifying the point of readiness for that means identifying the critical success factors of each area in the “drivers” framework below. The plan for transformation from the current state to the satisfaction of those success factors will be the strategy map of the migration to the innovation. LONG-TERM COST SEVICE DIVERSITY PROCESS MODULARITY Pay-as-you-go Fast realignment to requirements SCALABILITY Expand to demand level Critical mass @ point of demand