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GradSciComm Day 1

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  • 1. #GradSciComm Scaling Up Communication Trainings for Young Scientists
  • 2. HOW does change happen? WHO are the key people? WHAT should we teach?
  • 3. #GradSciComm @COMPASSonline
  • 4. Jay&Labov #GRADSCICOMM&WORKSHOP&PARTICIPANTS&AT&A&GLANCE December&5O6,&2013& Nancy&Baron Elizabeth&(Liz)&Bass James&(Jamie)&Bell Gerald&(Jerry)&Blazey Richard&(Rich)&Boone Russ&Campbell Phillip&(Phil)&Clifford Sharon&Dunwoody Clare&Fieseler Erica&Goldman Lisa&Graumlich Thomas&(Tom)&Hayden Geoff&Hunt Patricia&(Trish)&Labosky COMPASS 805.450.3158 NBaron@COMPASSOnline.org Center:for:the:Advancement:of:Informal: Science:Educa?on:(CAISE) 202.783.200:x:137 jbell@astc.org Division:of:Graduate:Educa?on, Na?onal:Science:Founda?on:(NSF) 703.292.4344 rboone@nsf.gov Postdoctoral:Educa?on,: Medical:College:of:Wisconsin 414.384.2000:ext:41584 pcliff@mcw.edu Scien?sts:with:Stories, University:of:North:Carolina 973.615.6335 Cmf29@live.unc.edu College:of:the:Environment,: University:of:Washington: 206.221.0908 envdean@uw.edu Public:Outreach, American:Society:for:Biology:and: Molecular:Biology:(ASBMB) 240.283.6626 ghunt@asbmb.org Center:for:Communica?ng:Science, Stony:Brook:University 631.632.1162: Elizabeth.Bass@stonybrook.edu Graduate:Educa?on:Moderniza?on:WG White:House:Office:of:Science:&: Technology:Policy:(OSTP) 202.456.6093 Gerald_C_Blazey@ostp.eop.gov Burroughs:Wellcome:Fund 919.991.5119 rcampbell@bwfund.org School:of:Journalism:and:Mass: Communica?on,: University:of:WisconsinaMadison 608.263.3389 Dunwoody@wisc.edu COMPASS 301.830.7086 egoldman@COMPASSonline.org Stanford:University 650.721.5722 thayden@stanford.edu Office:Strategic:Coordina?on,: Na?onal:Ins?tutes:of:Health:(NIH) 301.594.4863 laboskypa@od.nih.gov Bruce&Lewenstein Tiffany&Lohwater Susan&Mason Elizabeth&(Liz)&Neeley Michelle&Paulsen Jessica&Rohde Walter&(Wally)&Schaffer Dietram&Scheufele Ardon&Shorr Jack&Schultz Brooke&Smith Tobin&(Toby)&Smith John&Sonsteng Kate&Stoll Richard&(Rick)&Tankersley Center:for:Educa?on, Na?onal:Research:Council:(NRC) 202.334.1438 jlabov@nas.edu Center:for:Public:Engagement, American:Associa?on:for:the: Advancement:of:Science:(AAAS) 202.326.6506 tlohwate@aaas.org COMPASS 206.954.1150 LizNeeley@COMPASSOnline.org ENGAGE, University:of:Washington 719.271.7958 jro@jessicarohde.com Department:of:Life:Sciences: Communica?on, University:of:WisconsinaMadison 608.262.1614 scheufele@wisc.edu Bond:Life:Sciences:Center, University:of:Missouri 573.882.7957 SchultzJC@missouri.edu Associa?on:of:American:Universi?es: (AAU) 202.408.7500 Toby_smith@aau.edu AAAS:Fellow, Emerging:Leaders:in:Science:and:Society: (ELISS) 703a292a5078 katestoll@gmail.com Department:of:Science:Communica?on,: Cornell:University 607.255.8310 b.lewenstein@cornell.edu Office:of:Legisla?ve:and:Public:Affairs, Na?onal:Science:Founda?on:(NSF) 703.292.7748 smason@nsf.gov Office:of:STEM:Educa?on:Partnerships, Northwestern:University 847.579.9240 mapaulsen@northwestern.edu Office:of:Extramural:Research, Na?onal:Ins?tutes:of:Health:(NIH) 301.402.2725 schaffew@od.nih.gov Public:Communica?on:for:Researchers: (PCR), Carnegie:Mellon:University 908.307.0204 Ardon.Shorr@gmail.com COMPASS 503.286.2056 brooke.smith@COMPASSOnline.org Expert:Witness:Training:Academy, William:Mitchell:College:of:Law 651.290.6324 John.sonsteng@wmitchell.edu Division:of:Graduate:Educa?on, Na?onal:Science:Founda?on:(NSF) 703.292.8696 rtankers@nsf.gov,:rtankers@fit.edu
  • 5. History
  • 6. Entering the Century of the Environment: A New Social Contract for Science Jane Lubchenco As the magnitude of human impacts on the ecological systems of the planet becomes apparent, there is increased realization of the intimate connections between these systems and human health, the economy, social justice, and national security. The concept of what constitutes “the environment” is changing rapidly. Urgent and unprecedented environmental and social changes challenge scientists to define a new social contract. This contract represents a commitment on the part of all scientists to devote their energies and talents to the most pressing problems of the day, in proportion to their importance, in exchange for public funding. The new and unmet needs of society include more comprehensive information, understanding, and technologies for society to move toward a more sustainable biosphere—one which is ecologically sound, economically feasible, and socially just. New fundamental research, faster and more effective transmission of new and existing knowledge to policy- and decision-makers, and better communication of this knowledge to the public will all be required to meet this challenge. Scientists today are privileged to be able to indulge their passions for science and simultaneously to provide something useful to society. With these privileges, of course, comes serious responsibility. The close of a century and a millennium provides an occasion for reflection on the nature of these responsibilities and an evaluation of the extent to which we are fulfilling them. The scientific enterprise has provided phenomenal understanding of our bodies, our minds, our world, and our universe. The advances that have emerged from space, defense, and medical research, among many other areas—all of which have depended on basic research across all disciplines—have been astounding. Space exploration, for example, has given us not only new understanding of the cosmos, and wonderful products and technologies, but also a new sense of our world and ourselves: a sense captured forever by that first photograph of the whole Earth taken against the black background of space. Scientific research is advancing explosively on all fronts. The benefits include a dizzying array of new knowledge, economic opportunities, and products—ranging from laser surgery to genetic testing, from global positioning systems to prediction of El Nino events, from the discovery of new ˜ drugs derived from natural products to new information systems. In the United States, much of the inThe text is modified from her Presidential Address at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of the Advancement of Science, 15 February 1997. The author is in the Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331–2914, USA. E-mail: lubchenj@bcc. orst.edu vestment that produced this wealth was a result of strong bipartisan political support and popular enthusiasm for science that began during World War II and increased substantially in the 1960s. This support was predicated in part upon an (unwritten) social contract between science and society, specifically the expectation that a substantial investment in research would result in winning the war (initially World War II and later the Cold War), winning the space race, and conquering diseases (bacterial infections, polio, and cancer). The scale of the U.S. investment in science changed dramatically during this period. Investment in science in most other developed nations is predicated upon a similar expectation of a return of knowledge and technology to society. The scientific enterprise that has produced this wealth is widely admired and envied. The question I pose is whether the enterprise that has met these past challenges is prepared for the equally crucial and daunting challenges that lie in our immediate future. The answer that I must give is “no.” I assert that the immediate and real challenges facing us have not been fully appreciated nor properly acknowledged by the community of scientists whose responsibility it is, and will be, to meet them. Part of our collective responsibility to society must include a scientific community-wide periodic reexamination of our goals and alteration of our course, if appropriate. The fact that the scientific community has responded to societal needs several times in the past century—although generally in wartime—provides encouragement that it is possible to mobilize and change course rap- www.sciencemag.org idly in the face of a crisis. As the geologist Marshal Kay was fond of saying, “What does happen, can happen.” Despite the plethora of reports examining the future of the scientific enterprise (1, 2), I see the need for a different perspective on how the sciences can and should advance and also return benefit to society. This different perspective is firmly embedded in the knowledge of specific, identifiable changes occurring in the natural and social worlds around us. These changes are so vast, so pervasive, and so important that they require our immediate attention. Scientific knowledge is urgently needed to provide the understanding for individuals and institutions to make informed policy and management decisions and to provide the basis for new technologies. This paper is organized around four key questions: How is our world changing? What are the implications of these changes for society? What is the role of science in meeting the challenges created by the changing world? and How should scientists respond to these challenges? My goal in communicating these thoughts is to stimulate a dialogue within the scientific community on these topics. I hope that the result will be a thoughtful reexamination of our individual and collective priorities and actions. The Board of Directors of AAAS has initiated an electronic discussion of the relationship between science and society. A paper summarizing its deliberations along with comments from a number of scientists are posted to invite an exchange of ideas on the questions posed above. On behalf of the Board, I invite your participation (3). Global Changes and Their Causes How is our world changing? One major way is that we now live on a humandominated planet. The growth of the human population and the growth in amount of resources used are altering Earth in unprecedented ways. Through the activities of agriculture, fisheries, industry, recreation, and international commerce, humans cause three general classes of change. Human enterprises (i) transform the land and sea—through land clearing, forestry, grazing, urbanization, mining, trawling, dredging, and so on; (ii) alter the major biogeochemical cycles— of carbon, nitrogen, water, synthetic chemicals, and so on; and (iii) add or remove species and genetically distinct populations—via habitat alteration or loss, hunting, fishing, and introductions and invasions of species (4–6). The resulting changes are relatively well documented but not generally appre- ⅐ SCIENCE ⅐ VOL. 279 ⅐ 23 JANUARY 1998 491 Downloaded from www.sciencemag.org on March 30, 2011 ASSOCIATION AFFAIRS
  • 7. Develop research questions Assess results Engage NGOs Publics SCIENCE Conduct research Publish findings Media Policymakers Industry Scientists POLICY, ATTITUDES, DECISIONS, BEHAVIORS, ETC
  • 8. Vision
  • 9. We agree: there is an unmet need for communication skills training in STEM graduate education. What will be different when this need is met?
  • 10. We agree: there is an unmet need for communication skills training in STEM graduate education. What will be different when this need is met? Describe the 3 most important differences on 3 cards
  • 11. Roadblocks
  • 12. Write down the roadblocks (one per card) that obstruct the vision we’ve described 5 minutes
  • 13. the ‘how’
  • 14. Cornell NSF Bootcamp George Mason Astrobites ELISS Fellows Carnegie Mellon NSF Messenger Michigan State ENGAGE COMPASS UW Madison SciFund UW CoEnv Mizzou Stony Brook
  • 15. internal Carnegie Mellon ENGAGE George Mason Michigan State Stony Brook UW CoEnv Cornell Mizzou UW Madison external NSF Messenger COMPASS ELISS Fellows NSF Bootcamp Astrobites SciFund
  • 16. top-down NSF Messenger Cornell Mizzou Stony Brook ELISS Fellows Michigan State COMPASS Astrobites UW CoEnv NSF Bootcamp SciFund George Mason UW Madison Carnegie Mellon ENGAGE bottom-up
  • 17. how does change happen?
  • 18. Susan Mason NSF Becoming the Messenger
  • 19. Trish Labosky NIH “BEST” Program
  • 20. Bruce Lewenstein Cornell University
  • 21. Jack Schultz University of Missouri
  • 22. Phil Clifford Individual Development Plans
  • 23. Jessica Rohde University of Washington ENGAGE
  • 24. Reconvene at 1:00pm Lunch
  • 25. the ‘who’
  • 26. Phase 1: Scoping
  • 27. Phase 2: Crowdsourcing
  • 28. Phase 3: Interviews
  • 29. what is most needed?
  • 30. the ‘what’
  • 31. writing government social media nonprofits speaking museums policymaker s messaging television children industry radio theory NGOs journalists graphics schools fr aming businesses zoos presentations K-12 visuals writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio
  • 32. writing government social media nonprofits speaking museums policymaker s messaging television children industry radio theory NGOs journalists graphics schools framing businesses zoos presentations K-12 visuals writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs
  • 33. writing government social media nonprofits speaking m u s e u m s p o l i c y m a ke r s messaging television children industry radio theory NGOs journalists graphics schools fr aming businesses zoos presentations K-12 visuals writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs
  • 34. writing government social media nonprofits speaking museums policymaker s messaging television children industry radio theory NGOs journalists graphics schools fr aming businesses zoos presentations K-12 visuals writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs
  • 35. writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs
  • 36. writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon writing government social media nonprofits theory industry NGOs journalists graphics high schools framing presentations zoos businesses visuals radio jargon museums speaking policymakers messaging television children theory industry NGOs Core Competencies
  • 37. Competency the ability to do something Proficiency mastery of a skill
  • 38. Competency the ability to do something
  • 39. Write down what you believe are core competencies (one per card) in science communication 5 minutes
  • 40. One take on core science communication competencies
  • 41. Science comm skills  Content  Organization  Clarity and language  Style  Analogy  Narrative  Dialogue
  • 42. Context of science comm  Media structure and norms  Public knowledge of and attitudes towards science
  • 43. Views about science comm  Self confidence in speaking with media  Benefits & challenges of speaking with media  Attitudes towards science in media  Responsibility of individual scientists  Deficit model and attitudes towards public engagement
  • 44. what is missing?
  • 45. Proficiency mastery of a skill
  • 46. reflection
  • 47. niggle: verb - to cause slight but persistent annoyance, discomfort, or anxiety. Synonyms: irritate, annoy, bother, provoke, exasperate, upset, gall, irk,
  • 48. reception