An Inclusive
Approach to
CBDRR
1
Why do we need to be inclusive in Myanmar?

Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience

2
Consortium Approach
Technical vs Implementing partner
•
•
•
•

Oxfam – Women-led DRR, women’s leadership
Plan – SBDRR, chi...
Integrating an Inclusive approach
to CBDRR at all levels
1. Community level
2. Township level
3. State and
Regional level
...
Community Level Inclusive Steps

• Inclusive CBDRR
training
• Assessments (PVAs,
HCVAs etc.)
• Forming VDMC and
Task Force...
Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience

6
Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience

7
Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience

8
Community level pilots to further learning on
individual topics
• School Based DRR
• Women’s
Leadership
training
• Inclusi...
Township Level Inclusive Steps
•
•
•
•

Township Disaster Management Plans (TDMPs)
Passing on village DRR Action Plans to ...
State and Regional Inclusive Steps
•

Hosting State level meetings in all 14 States
introducing concepts of inclusiveness
...
National Level Inclusive Steps
• Inclusive Policy Review
• Standing Order and DM law
• Training for local NGOs on
Inclusiv...
Lessons Learnt
• The principle of inclusiveness must be mainstreamed
throughout the programme and not just the community
l...
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Presentation 1 inclusive approach action aid myanmar

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  • Tell the story of our ConsortiumInclusiveness is at our core, it is the guiding principle of our workWhy this approach is needed in MyanmarTalk a little bit about our design and how this supports and informs our workSpecific examples of our work on inclusiveness including successes and areas of improvment
  • Describe the social and cultural context in Myanmar which ultimately informs and guides our workDisability: despiteaglobal PWD average of 15%, a recent survey in Myanmar found that only 2% of community members had a disability, highlighting a very serious problem of visibility and understandingWomen’s Rights: Social and cultural norms that entrench patriarchy and the privileged male position, and hold women to be inferior in many aspects of life are deeply internalised, amongst both men and women in Myanmar; 91% of respondents in our project areas stated that men are better able than women to ‘manage’ communities during disasters; Older people: Older people are not listed as a vulnerable group in most DRR programmes. There is often stigma attached to older people that they are weak and useless (resulting in their needs, rights and contributions being neglected). However, elderly have shown the capacity to be enormously resilient and can highly contribute to historical analysis, hazard analysis and climate change analysis. Furthermore, many older people have become focal persons to receive and disseminate information about early warnings.Young people and children: children and young people are excluded from almost all community decision making processes; between 80% and 90% of community members in project areas thought that children do not have much to contribute in disaster preparedness processes
  • Talk about the consortium partners and what specialties they bring
  • Core of the inclusiveness design to our Consortium was to ensure integration at every level from the community, through the lower administrative levels (village tract – township) to state and then national.
  • Training central to the project’s design:First step was to ensure all staff, volunteers, community mobilisers and community members had gone through a rigorous inclusive CBDRR training. This training was delivered at national level through ToTs and then to each village over a course of a few months. Our learning from this process was that if we invested in the quality of the training the outcome was significantly better. For instance in AA we used a mixture of fellows and community mobilisers. Each of our fellows have been through a year’s training on many topics including gender sensitive programming, HRBA etc. and their ability to mainstream the theory of inclusiveness was markedly better than the community mobilisers who had only received 2 – 3 weeks training.
  • Inclusive Training
  • Getting young people involved in the simulation and first aid training
  • Conducting school based simulations
  • Hosted a State level workshop in all 14 StatesThis was our first opportunity to introduce some of the most basic concepts of DRR and CCA but also inclusiveness. These were a vital advocacy opportunity for the Consortium in areas which have been neglected and wil be the foundations for future CBDRR roll-out
  • Presentation 1 inclusive approach action aid myanmar

    1. 1. An Inclusive Approach to CBDRR 1
    2. 2. Why do we need to be inclusive in Myanmar? Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 2
    3. 3. Consortium Approach Technical vs Implementing partner • • • • Oxfam – Women-led DRR, women’s leadership Plan – SBDRR, child-centred DRR UN Habitat – earthquake risk assessment, strengthening institutional mechanisms HelpAge – Working with older people Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 3
    4. 4. Integrating an Inclusive approach to CBDRR at all levels 1. Community level 2. Township level 3. State and Regional level 4. National level Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 4
    5. 5. Community Level Inclusive Steps • Inclusive CBDRR training • Assessments (PVAs, HCVAs etc.) • Forming VDMC and Task Forces • Making Simulations Exercises Inclusive Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 5
    6. 6. Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 6
    7. 7. Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 7
    8. 8. Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 8
    9. 9. Community level pilots to further learning on individual topics • School Based DRR • Women’s Leadership training • Inclusive VDMC formation Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 9
    10. 10. Township Level Inclusive Steps • • • • Township Disaster Management Plans (TDMPs) Passing on village DRR Action Plans to TDMCs Inclusive CBDRR training for government staff Gender Equality Training for government staff Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 10
    11. 11. State and Regional Inclusive Steps • Hosting State level meetings in all 14 States introducing concepts of inclusiveness Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 11
    12. 12. National Level Inclusive Steps • Inclusive Policy Review • Standing Order and DM law • Training for local NGOs on Inclusive approaches • Inclusive CBDRR Training Pack and TOT • Including women in Carpenters Training • Earthquake Risk AwarenessRaising Toolkit Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 12
    13. 13. Lessons Learnt • The principle of inclusiveness must be mainstreamed throughout the programme and not just the community level work • Dedicated technical experts for each specialty • Qualitative and Quantitative tools are needed for field staff to ensure inclusiveness • Technical partners need to empower and equip the other partners with the skills to implement their own fully inclusive approach • More work to be done linking national level advancements to lower administrative levels • Inclusive targets need to be supported at every stage Myanmar Consortium for Community Resilience 13
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