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NGOs work in Cameroon with companies exporting timber to China: lessons learned

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This presentation by Norbert Sonne, from WWF in Cameroon, provides an overview of WWF and the Centre for Environment and Development’s work on providing technical support to forestry companies, and on building capacity of local NGOs and strengthening local communities. It also presents their work mapping Chinese investments and trade in the forestry sector in Cameroon.

The presentation was made at the fourth international learning event of the China-Africa Forest Governance Learning Platform, held in Pemba, Mozambique, from 23-25 October 2017.

The platform event focused on finding ways for Chinese businesses in Africa, and African businesses linked to China, to generate strong benefits for local economies in Africa while looking after forest resources for future generations.

More details: https://www.iied.org/china-africa-forest-governance-meeting-mozambique

Published in: Environment
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NGOs work in Cameroon with companies exporting timber to China: lessons learned

  1. 1. China-Africa Forest Governance Learning Platform Fourth International Learning Event Pemba, Mozambique 23-25 October 2017 NGO works in Cameroon with companies exporting timber to China: lessons learned Norbert SONNE and NGNIADO WOUALA WWF Cameroon
  2. 2. Content Main categories of NGOs Typology and characteristics of companies Company typology vs menu The content of our main menu Project achievements Beyond the project Geographical context
  3. 3. Main categories of NGOs 1. International NGOs • Global presence with good network • Good influence on processes and actors • Continuous/permanent funding • Skilled staff 2. National NGOs • National presence (in most of the time based in the capital) • Influence on processes and actors • Fluctuation of funding • Mainly « junior » staff in the search of experience • Often in competition with international NGOs 3. Local NGOs • Important fluctuation of funding • Limited influence on processes and actors when acting alone • Constructive alliance with international NGOs for field actions
  4. 4. Typology and characteristics of companies 1. Large size companies • Open for collaboration with NGOs, especially international NGOs • Most are engaged in forest management certification • Care about their image/reputation 2. Medium size companies • Open for collaboration - those whose main market is Europe • Less open for those whose main market is Asia: but can collaborate after pressure is exercised • Mainly engaged in legality certification 3. Small size companies • Closed for any collaboration with NGOs • Very dynamic in the space • Almost « invisible » • Limited engagement for legality certification • « good relation » with law enforcers 4. Trading companies • Most are of very small size • « Very invisible » • Limited engagement for legality certification • « very good relation » with law enforcers
  5. 5. Typology Vs Menu (based on 20 years experience) 1. Large size companies • More carrot (75%) than pepper/stick (25%) • Entering into a collaboration agreement • Technical support for adoption and implementation of best practices 2. Medium size companies • 50/50 carrot and pepper/stick, for not more than 5 years • Then revise the menu according to the company response 3. Small size companies • More pepper/stick than carrot (75/25) • Denunciation 4. Trading companies • More pepper/stick than carrot (90/10) • Denunciation
  6. 6. The content of our main « Menu with more carott » 1. Technical support to logging companies in the areas of: • Reduced impact logging • High conservation values • Wildlife inventories • Monitoring of the impacts of logging activities • Corporate social responsibility • Relations with communities & conflict resolution • Socio-economic studies 2. Capacity building of local NGOs • Conflict resolution • Corporate social responsibility • Norms for environmental and social best practices • Environmental and social impact assessment • Public policy and advocacy • Monitoring and denunciation of illegalities 3. Strengthening local communities • Negotiation with logging companies • Conflict resolution • Reporting illegal activities • Small size project development and implementation
  7. 7. Main achievements of China-Africa Forest Governance Project
  8. 8. Mapping China investments and trade in the forestry sector in Cameroon
  9. 9. 266568 381017 315127 309174 418218 503278 146069 226633 267174 187697 204319 276943 0 100000 200000 300000 400000 500000 600000 Year 2009 Year 2010 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2013 Year 2014 China Other countries % of Cameroon wood products exported to China compared to other countries (2009-2014) Trends (in m3) of logs exported to China compared to other countries (2009-2014) Mapping China investments and trade in the forestry sector in Cameroon 2/2
  10. 10. « Construction » of collaboration with companies • MoU signed with logging company SIM (410 000 ha) • MoU signed with ALPICAM (450 000 ha) • Discussions engaged with Chinese Association in forestry sector in Cameroon (MoU drafted) • Discussions engaged with STBK (250 000 ha) • Discussions engaged with SEFECCAM-SIENCAM (280 000 ha)
  11. 11. Technical support to companies SIM • Baseline assessment vis-à- vis legality in 2016 • Support development and implementation of action plan to comply with legality • Strengthening local communities to better defend their interest • Performance assessment in 2017 (with good progress) • Action plan updated based on 2017 results (including HCV, RIL…) ALPICAM • Support in the FSC Forest Management process, based on the FSC Controlled Wood audit • Support concentrated on wildlife management • Strengthening local communities to better defend their interest Chinese Association in forestry sector • Training giving on legality during SFA visit in June 2016 • MoU drafted and still to be commented by the Association
  12. 12. Policy works • Providing technical and financial support for the national consultation in the revision of the forestry law • Co-facilitation of the visit of SFA (high level officials) to Cameroon (June 2016) • Co-organization (with CED and NESDA) of the national workshop to share results of different studies to policy- makers/implementers • Training CSOs on environment and social guidelines for Chinsese obersee investments • Assessment of the enabling environment in forestry sector in Cameroon (using EEAT developed by WWF) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Accountability Efficiency Effectiveness Fairness/Equity Inclusiveness (Participation) Transparency CAMEROON: SCORES FOR EACH GOOD GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLE Pillar I. Policies, Legislation, and Institutions Pillar II. Planning, Decision- making, and Dispute Resolution Pillar III. Implementation, Enforcement, and Compliance
  13. 13. And what next? (seeing beyond the project life) • Valorize result of the current phase of the project (ending March 2018) to influence policy processes • Continue engaging Chinese Association, hopefully to reach an MoU and work « together » • Persue « constructing » collaboration with STBK and SEFECCAM-SIENCAM • Continue providing technical support to logging companies, with focus of legality compliance • Continue to strengthen the capacity of CSOs for monitoring and denunciation of illegal activities (perpetrated by companies « closed » to collaboration), with result to be picked up by Intenational NGOs for lobbying
  14. 14. THANKS 14 Norbert SONNE Forest Programme Coordinator WWF Cameroon Nsonne@wwfcam.org Skype: nsonne1 (+237) 6 96 63 06 16 Visit: http://gftn.panda.org

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