• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Final glg webinar 8 9 13
 

Final glg webinar 8 9 13

on

  • 200 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
200
Views on SlideShare
200
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • [Introduce yourself and your talk.]
  • Evite said we would “review progress to date and look forward to 2013.” To that end, want to cover the following today….
  • USDA had been supporting local and regional for years (see that paper in Obesity Prevention), but the HHFKA gave us the legislative mandate to do so. The authorizing language is very clear.
  • So section 243 created a farm to school program and encouraged USDA to support procurement of local and regional in schools. It also very specifically noted the degree to which food education and experiential learning was a part of farm to school. We were encouraged to: (read from the authorizing language).
  • What’s at stake? We know that …. (read from slide)
  • So section 243 created a farm to school program and encouraged USDA to support procurement of local and regional in schools. It also very specifically noted the degree to which food education and experiential learning was a part of farm to school. We were encouraged to: (read from the authorizing language).
  • What’s the context for USDA’s and FNS’s involvement in farm to school? For one, it fits in with some of the key goals that the department has identified for itself. USDA’s Strategic Plan for 2010 to 2015 lays out 4 major priorities, and the farm to school initiative supports 2 of them: Two of the objectives under USDA’s goal to “Ensure that All of America’s Children Have Access to Safe, Nutritious, and Balanced Meals” are to “Promote Healthy Diet and Physical Activity Behaviors” and to “Increase Access to Nutritious Food.” Farm to school programs have been proven to increase children’s consumption of fruits and vegetables, and can give children critical knowledge to establish lifelong healthy eating habits. The second pillar of USDA’s goal to “Assist Rural Communities to Create Prosperity so They Are Self-Sustaining, Repopulating, and Economically Thriving” is to “Develop and Support Regional Food Systems.” Farm to school programs support this goal by increasing market opportunities for regional farmers, fishers, ranchers, and food processors, and by contributing to economic development across numerous sectors.
  • Evite said we would “review progress to date and look forward to 2013.” To that end, want to cover the following today….
  • What’s at stake? We know that …. (read from slide)
  • Expect to see a focus on procurement.
  • What’s at stake? We know that …. (read from slide)
  • In USDA’s vision, school cafeterias championing U.S. agriculture and proudly promoting regionally sourced foods that meet or exceed school nutrition standards are the norm, not the exception. Regional offerings, and therefore economic opportunities for U.S. food producers, span the school meal tray and include everything from the salad bar and fresh fruit and vegetable servings to the wheat in the pizza crust, beans in the chili, rice in the stir fry, turkey in the sandwiches, and cheese in the quesadillas. (DK) Add educational language…
  • Evite said we would “review progress to date and look forward to 2013.” To that end, want to cover the following today….
  • [Conclude, thank the audience, and take questions if you have time.]
  • But before we do that, I wanted to take a moment to frame the various activities that we see part of the approach called F2S. Broadly, Farm to School initiatives connect schools, local farms, and communities as part of the movement to strengthen local food systems and reinvigorate local economies. A subset of initiatives called “farm to preschool” conduct similar activities in preschools, early care centers, head start programs. F2S has 4 distinct components – Local or regional procurement, School gardens, food and ag curriculum, and experiential education such as farm tours, cooking demonstrations, taste tests. The Farm to School approach – when taken in it’s entirety is the HOLISTIC APPROACH WE NEEDED TO PROMOTE. Not just one of these STRATEGIES, BUT ALL OF THEM TOGETHER to enable lasting change.
  • Founded in 2007, the National Farm to School Network is a non-profit. We are a collaboration of organizations across the country. Our vision is……….
  • NFSN covers work in both of these settings
  • Up and down communication and resource sharing from local, state, regional to national and vice versa keep the network alive and running, and you all are part of it, or could be part of it.
  • I am going to give you examples in each of these areas – items that you can engage in, or have the opportunity to access
  • Our signature national event – every other year. 1,000 people Broader scope – to include hospitals, prisons, colleges, workplaces.
  • One example of successful advocacy efforts through NFSN is the establishment and appropriation of the USDA F2S grant program in 2010. Once the program was funded, we partner closely with the implementing agency to assist in it’s implementation – through trainings, sharing of resources.At the state level, NFSN has been collecting information on state policies and provides a resource on our website that other states can learn from.We are also working with Food Policy Councils – since many include F2S as a priority area.
  • In the area of marketing, we lead a month long campaign in October to celebrate f2S month. In 2010, Congress passed a resolution designating October as F2S Month. This year, there are lots of activities and ideas for you to implement – Theme of the Day contributors range from Farm Aid to National Association to end Senior Hunger to the YMCA to USDA – we feature the work of these partners on one day of the month, and they provide you ideas and tools for implementing f2S activities from their perspective.F2S Counts – your way of getting counted and telling us what you did in October. We’ll have useful prizes for entries that range from toolkits to garden resources to free registrations and tickets to travel to the National F2C conference.
  • NFSN’s website is the go to place for all information F2S. Chock full of reports, tools, and most importantly has contact information for all the state and regional leads in the country.
  • NFSN has been providing trainings on F2S for several years –ranging from introductory to more advanced. As the F2S movement has grown, we have realized the importance of peer to peer learning. We are currently working with 20 leaders from across the country who represent key F2S stakeholders such as farmers, food service, teachers and educators, and early care providers. Through an interative process of identifying training needs, existing resources to avoid duplication, these leaders are very close to finalizing a set of training materials for use with their peers. They will be pilot testing these resources in the coming months, and then………….these wonderful tested resources will be made available widely through NFSN.
  • Lunch Bites is our short and sweet webinar series – in the time children get to eat school lunch (and most of us) – we offer you a topical presentation on one aspect of farm to school – use of local meats in school meal programs, how to find financing for F2S, school gardens
  • NFSN is also the repository of data, evaluation reports and research on F2S. We collect this regularly from across the country, and compile it in easy to understand bits. These resources are available on our website free – you can use these to talk to your school board, principal, legislators, funders – and be able to present data that supports why and how f2S programs can benefit children, farmers, communities and the economy. The resource on the right – Bearing Fruit, also has a compilation of evaluation tools and methods you can use for evaluating program

Final glg webinar 8 9 13 Final glg webinar 8 9 13 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome Please dial-in by phone for webinar audio at 800-347-8268 or 217-239-1048 Follow the prompts on the phone, and enter the following information Meeting ID: 3276 Meeting Password: 724665 Please mute/un-mute your phone by pressing #5 If you have questions, please type them into the Q & A box
  • Welcome • Why are we gathering today? • Meeting goals • Webinar Overview – USDA Farm to School – National Farm to School Network – Introduction to farm to school in the region • Where to go from here… • Q & A
  • USDA Farm to School Please welcome Deborah Kane – National Director, USDA Farm to School Program
  • Farm to School THE PROGRAMDeborah Kane August 2013
  • Agenda » Context and Background » USDA Programs and Services » Discussion and Questions
  • Section 243 of HHFKA Access to Local Foods: The Farm to School Program » The Secretary shall carry out a program to improve access to local foods in (eligible) schools.
  • What’s at Stake?
  • $10.4 Billion
  • Food Education Local Food
  • Perfect Fit Strategic Goal #1 » Ensure that All of America’s Children Have Access to Safe, Nutritious, and Balanced Meals. Strategic Goal #4 » Assist Rural Communities to Create Prosperity so They Are Self-Sustaining, Repopulating, and Economically Thriving.
  • Agenda » Context and Background » USDA Programs and Services » Discussion and Questions
  • Team: Regional & National Staff WRO SWRO MPRO MWRO SERO MARO NERO National Office
  • Farm to School Grants 32 Planning grants 36 Implementation grants $4.8 Million
  • Procurement Guidance » Geographic preference can be applied to most school food purchases for unprocessed locally grown or raised agricultural products. » Local sourcing is possible through DOD Fresh. » USDA Foods save money and can be part of healthful, local meals. USDA Foods Cash Assistance DOD Fresh
  • Census
  • Agenda » Context and Background » USDA Programs and Services » Discussion and Questions
  • [www.fns.usda.gov/farmtoschool]
  • National Farm to School Network Please welcome Anupama Joshi – Executive Director, National Farm to School Network
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Anupama Joshi
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Farm to School – A holistic approach SCHOOL GARDENSSCHOOL GARDENS EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION FOOD & AG CURRICULUM LOCAL PROCUREMENT
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities The National Farm to School Network (NFSN) envisions a nation in which Farm to School programs are an essential component of strong and just local and regional food systems, ensuring the health of children, farms, the environment, the economy and communities.
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Farm to School & Farm to Preschool  Farm to School (K-12 settings)  Farm to Preschool (preschools, child care centers, Head Start programs)
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities • Networking / Cultivating Membership / Creating Partnerships • Policy Advocacy and Administrative Support • Media & Marketing • Information Services • Training & Technical Assistance • Research & Evaluation • Farm to Early Care (Preschool)
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Policy Advocacy • Federal – Advocating for supportive legislation – Partnering with relevant agencies • State and Local – State F2S Policy listing (35+ states) – Food Policy Councils
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities October is…….
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities www.farmtoschool.org
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Peer Leadership Network • F2S leaders – Farmers – School food service – Teachers / educators – Early care providers • Training templates in development for 4 groups– available early 2014
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities 2nd Tuesday @ noon CT
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities
  • National Farm to School Network - Nourishing Kids and Communities Anupama Joshi National Farm to School Network anupama@farmtoschool.org (847) 917-7292 www.farmtoschool.org
  • Great Lakes Region Farm to School • Great Lakes Region of NFSN and Midwest Region of USDA FNS – USDA FNS Farm to School Coordinator – NFSN Regional Lead Agency – NFSN State Lead in each State – Partnerships and connected work • Introductions from MN, WI, IL, IN, MI & OH • Unite the region and work toward regional goals • Questions at the end
  • Great Lakes Region
  • Minnesota
  • Farm to School Leadership Team Has been meeting over the last two years to coordinate efforts Minnesota
  • Wisconsin Promote children’s health by providing fresh and minimally processed foods in schools and supporting the development of healthy eating habits. Wisconsin supports Comprehensive Farm to School which includes 1) local food procurement; 2) nutrition and agriculture education and 3) student engagement activities including school gardens.
  • Wisconsin 2011-2012 School Year Statistics: • 76 schools or districts self-identify as having a farm to school program • 189 schools or districts purchased local foods • An estimated $600,000 was spent on local food • 61 farmers sold their products directly to Wisconsin schools • 70 farmers participated in student education activities
  • Wisconsin • Statewide Strategic Planning Group working on different F2S issues • New Farm to School Coordinator at DATCP, Sarah Elliot. Statewide farm to school program formally moving to DATCP • Statewide Farm to School AmeriCorps Program • 14 counties funded for farm to school through TransformWI (CTG) • Hosted 2013 Wisconsin Farm to School Summit with 250 attendees in June • Awarded Specialty Crop Block Grant for Harvest Medley Blend
  • Illinois
  • Illinois - EXTENSION
  • Illinois - Partnerships
  • Illinois - Making Connections
  • OCTOBER is FARM to SCHOOL MONTH Illinois Farm to School Challenge
  • Indiana • Support for Farm to School: • Gaining Momentum in Indiana
  • Farm to School is Gaining Momentum Support for Farm to School in Indiana has been gaining momentum since the Fall of 2012 when three State agencies and Indiana’s Land Grant University, Purdue Extension, came together to advance Farm to School efforts
  • In August of 2012, a small group met for the first time to talk about Farm to School. • Monthly Meetings – What started as a small group quickly grew to over 40 members with meetings lasting 2-3 hours – Lots of new faces; still getting to know each other – Lots of energy and excitement – Lots of talent • We needed a plan/mission to guide our work and knew it was important to identify what the group wanted to work on Getting Started in Indiana
  • Getting Started in Indiana • Three topics were identified and three small working groups were formed – Grants – Procurement – Education • A steering committee of core leaders volunteered to meet monthly – With shorter early morning meetings • Small groups held first meetings in July – Begin planning action steps for the next 12 months
  • Indiana Early Projects • Created a Logo and brochure to hand out at events and help start the discussion about Farm to School • Applied for the 2014 USDA Farm to School Grant • Applied for the Indiana Specialty Crop Block Grant program
  • New Indiana staff hired in past year • Department of Education hired a new School and Community Nutrition Wellness Specialist – with more time dedicated to coordinating Farm to School activities • Purdue Extension hired its first Local Foods Coordinator – to identify people and communities that are already building connections between farmers and consumers and work with them to make the statewide system stronger • Indiana Farm Bureau hired a new Education Coordinator – to develop and refine curriculum for Agriculture in the Classroom • Indiana State Department of Health/Food Protection Program hired two Food Safety Farm Consultants – to work with local farmers to assist with food safety programs
  • What’s next for Indiana? • Quarterly Newsletter • Develop a Website • Develop Indiana-specific resources • Develop a Communication Plan
  • • As we get started on this journey we are fortunate to have our neighboring states to lean on and learn from • What advice do you have for Indiana? –Website advice… –Toolkit advice –Outreach and Communications • Share lessons learned How other states can help Indiana
  • Michigan • Partners – Michigan Department of Education – Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development – Michigan State University Extension – Michigan Land Use Institute – Michigan FoodCorps • Resources – www.mifarmtoschool.msu.edu – Michigan Farm to School listserv
  • Michigan • Surveys conducted in 2012 by the Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems revealed tremendous opportunity: • Nearly half (47%) of Michigan vegetable farmers reported interest in selling to K-12 schools • More than half (54%) of school food service directors reported purchasing local foods through one or more channels in the previous year, and the majority (89%) expressed interest in purchasing local foods in the future • The majority (68%) of staff from Great Start programs indicated that they were not involved in Farm to School, but most (69%) expressed interest in connecting their program with local farmers
  • Ohio Approximately 300 Farm to School program enthusiasts gathered in March 2013 to share experiences, knowledge and network throughout the day, and Carol Smathers became the new State Lead for Ohio in April.
  • Ohio “School to Farm Road Trip” A trip developed to show educators, administrators, and food service personnel how they can increase the use of local agriculture in their school lunch program. The trip incorporated a visit to the Geauga County Growers Auction and to the following local farms—Covered Bridge Gardens, Field Fresh Farm, Farm 153, and True Earth Organics.
  • Ohio Farm to School month event to be held at the Ohio Statehouse. Key partners: Ohio Dept. of Edu. Ohio Dept. of Health Ohio Dept. of Agric.
  • Q&A • We will take some time here to answer any questions from today’s speakers. To ask a question, please e-mail vherald@wisc.edu.
  • What’s Next? • Gathering in Chicago – October 28, 2013 • Poll Questions to help us move forward
  • Gathering Topics What topics are you most interested in learning about and/or discussing at an in-person regional meeting. Please check all that apply: • Procurement & Geographic Preference • Learning about different farm to school structure and communications in each state • Food Safety (farmers, supply chain, GAP) • Food Safety (school gardens and garden food in cafeterias) • Regional priorities and how to move forward together • Identifying regional farm to school priorities and projects • Other (please write your ‘other’ into the Q&A box on your screen)
  • Regional Conversations How interested are you in discussing different ways the region can work together to move farm to school forward at the state and regional level? • Very Interested • Somewhat interested • Neutral • Not interested at all
  • Other October 28th Actions Is there anything else you would like to do or discuss as a region when we meet in-person in Chicago on October 28th? (Please enter your thoughts into the Q&A box.)
  • Travel Needs for Chicago Will you require travel mileage and lodging reimbursement for the Chicago meeting? • No, I can cover my own travel costs • Yes, 0-$150.00 • Yes, $151-$300.00 • Yes, $301-$450.00 • Yes, $451.00-$600.
  • Travel Funding Does your organization have the capacity to fund other attendees (from your state or other states) for travel mileage and lodging reimbursement for the October 28th event in Chicago? If so, please e-mail vherald@wisc.edu.
  • Closing & Thank You • Thank you for joining us today. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago. • Thank you to planning partners at USDA FNS Midwest, Seven Generations Ahead and University of Illinois Extension Minnesota Susan DeBlieck University of Minnesota Extension deblieck@umn.edu Wisconsin Sara Tedeschi UW-Madison, CIAS smtedeschi@wisc.edu Illinois Julia Govis University of Illinois Extension jgovis@illinois.edu Michigan Colleen Matts MSU Center for Regional Food Systems Michigan State University matts@msu.edu Indiana Laura Hormuth Indiana State Department of Health lhormuth@isdh.in.gov Ohio Carol Smathers Ohio State University Extension smathers.14@osu.edu National Farm to School Network, Great Lakes Region Vanessa Herald UW-Madison CIAS vherald@wisc.edu