Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Strategic Thinking Workshop
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Strategic Thinking Workshop

80,766
views

Published on

Workshop on How to Think Strategically. …

Workshop on How to Think Strategically.

We look at STRATEGY & PLANNING as a way to help Brand Leaders be better Strategic Thinkers and write better Brand Plans. In that workshop, we would look at:
1. How to THINK STRATEGICALLY, helping to make focused choices on the pathway to your vision
2. The role of BRAND STRATEGY in creating a bond, power and profit, beyond what the product itself can achieve.
3. Creating BRAND PLANS that everyone in your organization can follow.

Published in: Business, News & Politics

6 Comments
100 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
80,766
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
26
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
101
Comments
6
Likes
100
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Workshop for Brand Leaders to make them better strategic thinkers
  • 2. We make your team of brand leaders better We can customize programs to the needs of your team with a strong menu of interactive brand leadership workshops 1. Strategic Thinking 2. Brand Plans 3. Positioning Statements 4. Creative Briefs 5. Brand Analysis 6. Better Advertising 7. Media Plans 8. How to Run Your Brand 9. Managing your Marketing Career 10. Motivational Lunch and Learns 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 The Brand Leadership Center We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. We coach Brand Leaders to think more strategically, looking at brand, consumer, competitive, situational and purpose driven strategy.
  • 3. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Helping Brand Leaders to be better Strategic Thinkers and write better Brand Plans How to THINK STRATEGICALLY, helping to make focused choices on the pathway to your vision The role of BRAND STRATEGY in creating a bond, power and profit, beyond what the product itself could achieve. The FOUR TYPES OF STRATEGY including consumer, competitive, situational and purpose-driven strategy 1 2 3
  • 4. How to THINK STRATEGICALLY helping to make focused choices on the pathway to your vision 1 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 4Page
  • 5. There are two kinds of success—initial success, which many achieve, and ultimate success, which only a handful achieve. Winston Churchill We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 6. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. How to think Strategically Turning focus into bigger gains for your business Strategic thinkers see “what if” questions before they see solutions. They map out a range of decision trees that intersect and connect by imagining how events will play out. They reflect and plan before they act. They think slowly, logically, always needing options. Non strategic thinkers see answers before questions. They get to answers quickly, and get frustrated in delays. They believe doing something is better than doing nothing at all. They opt for action over thinking. They are impulsive doers who get things done.
  • 7. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Conflicts with Strategic Thinkers Conflict with those who are relationship oriented people Sales people are not less strategic, but place a higher value in relationship than many marketers. They have to work within the needs and opinions of their buyers and balance shorter term risk with strategic gains. Conflict with creative people Creative people are more emotional than brand leaders and value pride more than the brand leader—they want to make work they can show off. The best marketers understand and work within these conflicts. Conflict with action-oriented people There is a mistaken attitude that doing something is better than doing nothing. The problem is that without proper focus, it just spreads resources randomly. (time, investment, people, partners)
  • 8. Target Market Expected Result Big Idea Main Message Support Points We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Do you suffer from Brand Leader writer’s block? If you have ever just sat there looking at these Brand Plan words and gotten writer’s block, you are not alone. Vision Purpose Goals Key Issues Strategies Tactics Budget Advertising Stimulus Response Media Channels
  • 9. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. We have some long term thoughts on where the brand can go and and an inspiration that keeps us going. Those thoughts help shape the things we want to achieve with our brand. To get started, there are things that are getting in the way of us achieving our goals. The brand has various options for how to get there. And we apply our resources against the best options. We try to find a slice of the population to get them to take an action that makes our brand bigger/better/stronger. We then find out what to say and how to talk to them to trigger that action We need to re-enforce why we can do it and others can’t. We then create the most motivating stimulus to get them to take action and put it in part of their life where they are most likely to hear it and act on it. Marketing made easy in about 150 words Describing the entire Planning process sounds pretty simple. Yet, how come it’s so difficult to write a good plan? 9Page
  • 10. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. We have some long term thoughts on where the brand can go (vision) and and an inspiration that keeps us going (purpose). Those thoughts help shape the things we want to achieve (goals) with our brand. To get started, there are things that are getting in the way (key issues) of us achieving our goals. The brand has various options for how to get there. We apply our resources (budget/people) against the best options. We try to find a slice of the population (target) to get them to take an action (expected result) that makes our brand bigger/better/stronger (big idea). We then find out what to say (main message) and how to talk to them to trigger that action We need to re-enforce why we can do it and others can’t. (support) We then create the most motivating stimulus (product, ad, promotion, experience) to get them to take action and put it in part of their life where they are most likely to hear it and act on it. (medium/channel/service) Describing the entire Planning process sounds pretty simple. Yet, how come it’s so difficult to write a good plan? Brand Plan Positioning Execution 10Page
  • 11. What is your current competitive position in the market? Product Concept Idea Service/Ex perience Price/Value Continue Momentum Turn Around Re-Focus Start Up Indifferent Like It Love It Beloved How tightly connected is your consumer to your brand? What is the core strength your brand can win on? What is the current business situation that your brand faces? Model for helping to choose your brand strategy 1 4 2 3 Brand Strategy We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Leader Challenger Flanker Guerilla 11Page
  • 12. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Fast Thinkers: • Instinctual, automatic, emotional, subconscious, reaction Slow Thinkers: • Logical, deeper thinking, effortful, calculating, conscious Your brain might move fast, but sometimes you need to change speeds. Marketers need to be both FAST and SLOW, but in the right places. Use your instincts on execution, but find ways to slow things down on Strategy Are you a Fast Thinker or Slow Thinker?
  • 13. Think slowly with strategy. Think quickly with instincts.
  • 14. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Five ways to slow down your thinking so that you actually move faster 1. Find your own thinking time. Go for walks at lunch or a drive somewhere to get away from it all. Block hour long “thinking meetings” with yourself. 2. Organize your week to fit your thinking pace. For instance, maybe talk “big ideas” on a Friday morning so you can take the weekend to think, yet schedule quick updates on Monday afternoon that clears your mind for the week. 3. Do the deep thinking before the decision time comes. Always be digging deep into the analytics to prepare yourself, no matter your level. 4. Next time in a meeting, spend your energy asking the best questions. Too many leaders try to impress everyone with the best answers—next time stump the room with the best question. 5. Proactively meet your partner team. Get to know their needs, rather than wait for a problem or conflict. Come to them proactively with possible solutions so you both win. 14Page
  • 15. Can you focus your brain to think strategically? What makes a good strategy?
  • 16. As you tell your analytical stories, remember the six Elements Needed for Good Strategy 1 2 3 4 5 6 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 16Page
  • 17. Alignment of your limited resources to a distinct strategic point you wish to penetrate, creating positive momentum on a pathway towards your vision. The Six Elements needed for Good Strategy Break through point where you see a shift in momentum towards your vision. It offers potential proof to everyone that this strategy will work, helping rally others–the team, agency and even your boss. An aspirational stretch goal for future, linked to a well-defined purpose. It should push you. It should scare you a little, but excite you a lot. Something happening in the market, as a potential strategic opening based on trends in the market (e.g. consumer behavior, technology). Ability to turn the early win into creating a momentum, that leads to the tipping point where you achieve more in return than the effort put in. Realization point where you see a shift in positional advantage or power that allows you to believe your vision is achievable. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 17Page
  • 18. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. The only way to win in strategy is when your gains exceed your effort—you to get more, than you put in. That starts with focus. • Every Brand has limited resources (financial, time, effort and alliances) against endless opportunistic choices to make (target, message, strategy and activities). Strategy starts with making a choice, where you will apply your limited resources, against the pressure points you know you can win and breakthrough. Focus is essential to Strategy A car jack on or megaphone both start with a focal point that amplifies the effort and allows you to get more than you put in. 18Page
  • 19. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. "Fire must be concentrated on one point, and as soon as the breach is made, the equilibrium is broken and the rest is nothing.” Napoleon on strategic focus We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 20. • Focus makes you matter most to those who care the most. Don’t blindly target consumers: target the most motivated. Focusing your limited resources on those consumers with the highest motivation and propensity to buy what you are selling will deliver the highest return on investment. • In a competitive category, no one brand can do it all: brands must be better, different or cheaper to survive. Giving the consumer too many messages will confuse them as to what makes your brand unique. Trying to be everything to everyone is the recipe for being nothing to anyone. • Return on Effort (ROE) is a great tool for focusing your activity. Doing a laundry list of activity spreads your limited resources so thin that everything you do is “ok” and nothing is “great”. In a crowded fast economy, “ok” never breaks through enough to get the early win and tipping point to open up the gateway to even bigger success. Focus on your target consumer, your main message, your strategy and mobilize your activities We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 20Page
  • 21. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. When you focus, five great things happen to your brand 1. Better return on investment (ROI) 2. Better return on effort (ROE) 3. Stronger reputation 4. More competitive 5. Bigger and better P&L We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 22. Case Study: Starbucks loses focus, only to regain it • In 03, Starbucks creates their own recording company, winning 8 Grammy’s 2 years later. In 06, they launched their own movie, started partnership with William Morris to scout for music, books, films. Opens “entertainment” office in LA. • In 08, Starbucks cuts 18k jobs, closes 977 stores, sales down 7%. Stock price falls to $7.83, down from $39.63 in 2008. Brand in complete free fall. Is it the next Benetton? • In 2009, Starbucks re-focuses on what they do best: COFFEE. They closed every store for a day of re-training the barista. • Starbucks begin to innovate deeper around their COFFEE, with broader line of coffee, pastries, accessories and sandwiches. • Starbucks 2014 sales up 58% versus 2009, five year 10% CAGR. Gross Margins back up to healthy 55% range. • Current stock price at $75, a $10K investment in 08 would get you $95,800 today, by focusing on COFFEE. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 22Page
  • 23. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Too many pure strategists over look the EARLY WIN, and think of strategy as just vision and strategic choices. But they’ve never run a Brand, and they don’t know how many others you need to keep motivated and aligned. You want that Early Win, to kick-start some momentum–slice off part of the business or population segment or have your message connect. You need this to get everyone buying into the strategy. LEVERAGE is when you start to use the positional advantage or power the early break through has given you. Without this, the early win becomes the only win, and it’s a hollow strategy. Believe in your new power and use it to push and transform your wins into even bigger wins. As you go through the process, it’s important that you not get distracted from achieving the GATEWAY that lines up to your vision. It’s easy to get tempted by new opportunities that your break through has given you, but you have to stay focused on your vision. Once you breakthrough, strategy becomes a transformation going beyond the breakthrough 23Page
  • 24. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • At a crucial point of World War 2, while Germany was fighting a war on two fronts (Russia and Britain), the Allied Forces planned D-Day for 2 years and joined in full force (Great Britain, US, Canada, Australia) to focus all their attention on one beach, on one day. • Prior to the attack, there was debate, do we attack in one place that could be penetrated or in multiple spots where the Germans would have to fight many battles? The smart decision started with focus. Case Study: D-Day focuses the entire war effort on one beach. Option 1 Focused Attack Option 2 Multiple Attacks 24Page
  • 25. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. D-Day delivers on the six elements of strategy Win World War II, with a goal to re-claim Europe and stop Germany. Spread democracy. All of the Allied forces of 156,000 soldiers, landing on the Beaches of Normandy on the morning of June 6th, 1944. Planned excessively, debated options, looked for beaches unguarded by Germans. Russia was attacking from the East weakening/distracting Germany. Despite heavy casualties, the Allies were able to capture the beaches and within 5 days of D Day, and were able to put 325,000 soldiers on mainland Europe. Re-claiming Paris, pushing back the German Army, turned the momentum into the Allied Forces side. The allies were able to take the Positional Power and shift it to where Germany was now defending on their own territory. A year later, the allies defeat Germany in Berlin. The US was now able to focus and fight the Pacific war and defeat Japan. 1 2 3 4 5 6 4 Strategic Choices 25Page
  • 26. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • Vision: Win World War II, spread ideals of democracy. • Goals: Re-claim Europe, maintain troops. • Key Issues: How do we turn the tide in the war effort in Europe? Where would the best attack point be to get on continental Europe? What are the defense technology investments needed? • Strategy: pin-pointed attack to gain a positional power on continental Europe. • Tactic: D-Day, taking all our troops and attack the Beaches of Normandy to get back on mainland Europe and battle Germany on an equal footing. What would the D-Day Brand Plan look like? Strategic Lesson: Focusing your resources will only strengthen your chance to breakthrough and make an impact. 26Page
  • 27. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • In 2005, Avril’s career was flat, after some early success, which is a normal path for young musicians. Her concert attendance falling, airplay down. • To kick off her album, she did a series of free mall concerts—and was criticized as desperate. • She was desperate and not everyone understood the logic of the free concerts. Case Study: True test of the Strategy—will it explain free mall concerts by Avril Lavigne? Is this a good strategy or bad? 27Page
  • 28. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Be a pop superstar, #1 album, sold out concerts. Malls are exactly where her target (11-17 female) hangs out, allowing her to focus all her energy on her core target. Positioned as giving back to her fans. First star ever to give free concerts. She had a new album coming out. There were still record stores in malls. Attracted 5k screaming 13-year-olds per mall which created an early win among her most loyal of fans: those who loved and adored her. Local news covered the story giving her added exposure. Everyone (mom/kids) happy with “free” gesture. Avril delivers on the six elements of strategy Able to leverage goodwill and energy to get loyal fans to go buy her album in the mall record stores which helped her album debut at #1 on the charts. Everyone knows the charts are the gateway to bigger mass audiences–more radio play, iTunes downloads and more talk value. The comeback complete. 1 2 3 4 5 6 28Page
  • 29. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • Vision: Recording superstar • Goals: New Album Sales, increase popularity, new recording contract • Key Issue: How do we drive album sales for a slumping Avril? • Strategy: Reconnect with core teen fans to create momentum to trigger album sales • Tactic: Free Mall tour to get most loyal fans to reconnect and buy the new album. A great example to shows the power of the Early Win. Getting her most loyal fans to buy in and get very close, enabled everything to happen in her come back. What would Avril’s Brand Plan look like 29Page
  • 30. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • Following their “hobby” (case study on losing focus) going into the entertainment field in 2003-2008, they hit the skids and faced some trouble that caused them to re-trench. • They rebuilt everything back around the coffee routine. They closed their stores for an entire day to re-train every barista. They created snacks and pastries to gain more share of requirements around coffee, launched sandwiches to stretch the coffee routine to lunch and created new versions of coffee to deepen love affair with the most loyal users. Case Study: Starbucks refocuses by building around the Coffee routine. Is this a good strategy or bad? 30Page
  • 31. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Cherished meeting place for all your quick service food needs. Build around the coffee ritual, but look to shift coffee routine to both breakfast/lunch. Built broader portfolio of products– refreshing drinks, delicious deserts, snacks and sandwiches around these two time-slots. How Starbucks matches up to the Six Elements of Strategy Starbucks had the under-utilized bricks and mortar of their restaurants, almost un-used past 11am. Drove broader portfolio helps share of requirements. Higher same store sales. Starbucks launched series of new products that made Starbucks seem big on innovation, including sandwiches, wraps, pastries and cookies, all with high quality and successfully connecting with the most loyal Starbucks fans. Turning coffee routine into a breakfast/lunch routine, expanding life ritual of Starbucks so that it’s now a broad-based meeting place. Starbucks is no longer seen as just for morning coffee, but rather an escape at any point in the day. Double-digit growth the past 5 years and the Starbucks brand is one of the most beloved with consumers. 31Page
  • 32. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. • Vision: Cherished meeting place for all your quick service food needs • Goals: Increase same store sales, greater share of requirements from Starbucks loyalists • Key Issue: How do we get back on track? How do we drive significant growth of same store sales? How do we build smartly beyond coffee? • Strategy: Move Starbucks loyalists to lunch with an expanded lunch menu. • Tactic: Exotic refreshing coffee choices, light lunch menu, increase desert offerings. What would Starbucks Brand Plan look like 32Page
  • 33. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Does your strategy have:  An end in mind vision, pathway that has milestones, specific goals for your program.  Opportunity that creates an opening for your brand to quickly take advantage of.  Pin-pointed focus of your resources (effort, investment, time, partners)  An early win as the breakthrough point.  Game changing Leverage point, where there is a change in positional power and you’re able to turn a small win into something big.  Gateway to something bigger, defined as a win for the brand that translates into an increase in power or value. Strategy is about choices, not chances. Strategy helps accomplishes goals that move you towards a vision. 33Page
  • 34. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 5 Questions to Ask When Mapping Out Your Strategy 1. Where do you want to be in 5-10 years? If you woke up in 10 years, what did you achieve? What is your vision? Why are you doing this? What are your longer term goals? 2. Where will you win? What is the defined playing field? With what Consumer target? With what Channel or customers? Defined Positioning? Competitive space? 3. How will you win? Mapping out choices you will make to connect with consumers. Story: messaging, customer value proposition, benefits aligning to your brand assets. Freshness: Innovation/New products. Experience: Culture and Operations. Execution: speed, precision, magic, design, service 4. How will you mobilize and focus your resources to win? Every brand is constrained by resources: time, people, money, partners. The choices you make help drive the biggest ROI (return on investment) and ROE (return on effort) 5. What will you do to execute in order to achieve success? Staying on strategy. Project management. Incredible execution. Management operations. Culture. 34Page
  • 35. The role of BRAND in creating a bond, power and profit, beyond what the product itself could achieve. 2 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 36. What is a Brand? Logo Product Name Package Design Slogan Service Experience Person Colour Company Name Reputation Patent Formulation Logo Story Trademark Incorporated Tag Line Advertisement Logo Symbol Ingredients Promise Copyrights Sku Look Name Store packaging Innovation Product Design Shelf Speed of Service Procedures
  • 37. We are connected to Brands in ways we can’t easily explain, that goes far beyond the actual product. These brands are somehow easily recognizable, even without logos based on some sensory connection, strong memory or a continued experience. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 37Page
  • 38. The Evolution from Product to Brand Emotional Needs Rational Needs Brands start as a product solving a consumers’ rational problem. Product Early on, you sell to whoever buys Get an identity Create a promise you can consistently deliver Execute the product and marketing Create an experience Get a reputation Big Idea Brands become an Idea, meeting their emotional enemy, that consumers feel. PRODUCT: Special K is a light tasting, low calorie, cereal. BIG IDEA: Special K empowers women to take Control and maintain their healthy weight We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 38Page
  • 39. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. A Brand versus a Product Product  Tangible to the senses  Legally protected brand name  Solves a Problem  Rational decisions  Legally protected Design  It is consumed  Build it into a routine  It can be debated  Lasts as long as the product Brand  An idea with Intangibles  Many times has a nick-name  Fights a consumer enemy  Emotional decisions  Becomes a reputation  It is experienced  It becomes a ritual  It will be defended  Lasts as long as the brand We have brands, if we think we can make more money from brands, than if we just had a product. There really is no other reason. Product Brand 39Page
  • 40. What is a Brand? A brand is a unique idea, perceived in the minds and hearts of the consumer, consistently delivered by the experience, creating a bond, power and profit, beyond what the product itself could achieve. The more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand can be.
  • 41. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. LOVE IT INDIFFERENT BELOVED BRAND LIKE IT No Opinion Not Aware. Confused. Not Interested. Stick to Current Brand. Satisfies Need Thought About it. Tried it. Practical. Makes Sense. Crave It Great Experience. A Favourite. Emotional Choice. Lifestyle Fit. Self Expressive Outspoken Fan. Would never switch. Memories. Built into Life. Consumers move along a “Brand Love Curve”, as they become more connected, their feelings & behaviors change. © Beloved Brands Inc. I’m curious for knowledge o be iced l c I want to be in Control I am Comfortable I want to be myself Our Consumer Likeable Friendly In mate Happy Easy Going Nurtured Compassion Down to Earth Relaxed Honest Family Trust Safe Respect Reliable Knowledge Wisdom Smarter Competent I want to feel liked © Hotspex Inc Emo onal Cheat Sheet for Brands
  • 42. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. At the Beloved stage, demand becomes desire, needs become cravings, thinking is replaced with feelings. Loyal Emotional Connected Favorite Routine Love It Use It Functional Enjoy It Rational Random Like It It will do Unfamiliar Other Brand Basic Needs Easily Switch Indifferent Beloved Brands Survey Tracker © Beloved Brands Inc. Un-relenting Personal Possessive Outspoken Ritual Beloved 42Page
  • 43. Love Curve Stage Consumers View Why is your Brand here Indicators in the Market How to get the next stage Indifferent No Opinion. Don’t care. Bored. Unaware. Confused. Hated. New Product. You sell but don’t market. Or you’ve fallen from grace. Skinny Funnel. Shrinking Margins. Share Squeeze. No Effort = No Sales. Consideration & Purchase. Focus on niche. Mind share. Mind Shift. New News. Like It It will do. Buy It. Functional, Rational. Basic Needs. Ordinary. Protective.& Cautious. Rational thinking. New Brand with Momentum. Inconsistent. Low conversion to sales. Brand doesn’t feel different. Stagnant share. High Private Label. Build Bigger Following. Connect Emotionally with those that Love. Build Big Idea. Love It Loyal, possessive, outspoken. Emotional. Part of their life. Emotional Connection. Consistent Positive Experiences. Surprise and Delight. Robust Brand Funnel. Healthy Tracking Scores. Share Gains. Healthy P&L. Emphasize the Experience. Tug at Heart to drive deeper Connection. Magic. Beloved Iconic. Perceived quality. Favourite part of their day. Outspoken fans. Self-Expression. Perceptions. Experience. Wield Power. Dominant Share. Net Promoter Scores. Preferential Treatment. Broaden the Audience. Broaden the Offering. Don’t be Complacent. Consumers act differently at each stage of the Brand Love Curve. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 43Page
  • 44. Consumers Connect with brands based on a Big Idea and the 5 connectors must align to that Big Idea How well does the brand concept connect to consumers? How well does the brand experience live up to and consistently deliver the promise? How well does the brand communicate their differences and move consumers? How well does the brand stay fresh and on top of trends with consumers? Promise Experience Brand Story Freshness Positioning Innovation Culture & Operations Communication What focused choices does the brand make to drive growth and profits? Strategy Brand Plan I’m curious for knowledge I want to be Noticed I feel Optimistic I want to be in Control I Comforta I w to my Our Consumer Mo vated Special Successful Inspired Excited Interes ng Alive Cool Playful Popular Trendy Likeable Friendly In mate Happy Nurture Compassion Fam Trust Resp Knowledge Wisdom Smarter Competent I want to feel liked I want to feel Free Beloved Brands The Brand The Big Idea We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 44Page
  • 45. Promise Experience Freshness Positioning Innovation Culture & Operations Communication Strategy Brand Plan Big Idea We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Consumer Big Idea for Apple Apple makes technology so SIMPLE, so that everyone can be part of the future We make technology so easy to use, everyone can feel a bit smarter. Apple starts with the end consumer experience & works back to the technology. Technology shouldn’t be frustrating. We make it simple enough so you can be engaged right away, do more and get more. Surprising technology that changed the world, appearing to leap frog competitors. Technology made simple, stylish designs, user friendly functionality, convenience. Brand Story 45Page
  • 46. Brand Power SUBSTITUTES can’t duplicate emotional connection CONSUMERS feel more, think less.NEW BRANDS can’t break emotional bond. SUPPLIERS willing to cut costs to be part of the brand. All MEDIA favors beloved brand: paid, earned, search and social. CHANNEL Consumers switch stores before they switch brands. Beloved Brands turn love into a source of power EMPLOYEES where brand and culture are one. KEY INFLUENCERS carry an influence over the purchase We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 46Page
  • 47. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Beloved Brands turn Power into Profit Driving increased demand will drive the price up, and the quantity up, which gives you a better economies of scale Profitability = Margin x Quantity Margin Quantity Premium price Current Users using more Find New Uses Cost of Goods Over head Selling Price Penetrate New Users Enter New Categories Market Share Trading Consumers Up Marketing Costs Selling Costs Expand Category Size Market Size Costs Price Quan ty Supply Demand Increased Demand $400 $250 10M 15M 47Page
  • 48. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Higher Margin % Brand Profit = (Price – Cost ) x (Market Share x Market Size) Look at brand wealth through 8 ways 1 2Premium Price Trading Up Stealing share Get loyal Users to use more 5 6 3 Lower Cost of Goods Efficient Spend4 7 8 Enter New Markets Find New Uses Price Cost Share Market Size Higher Volume 48Page
  • 49. A Beloved Brand uses the love consumers have for the brand to replicate the power of a Monopoly.
  • 50. Love Connection Power Growth Profit We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 51. The FOUR TYPES OF STRATEGY Including consumer, competitive and situational, purpose-driven strategy 3 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 52. Four Types of Strategy 1 2 3 Consumer Strategy Competitive Strategy Situational Strategy Purpose driven Strategy4
  • 53. Consumer Strategy 1
  • 54. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Consumer Strategy Consumer strategy every strategic and tactic revolve around the consumer. • Consumer centric brands have a well defined target, going after the most motivated consumer, tapping into life insights to connect. • Consumer centric brands talk about what the consumer gets (rational benefits) and how they feel (emotional benefits) ahead of what the brand does (features, claims, RTBs). There is a balance of rational and emotional benefits. • Consumer centric brands need a Big Idea that connects with consumers. And then they align everything around that Big Idea. • Consumer centric brands build strategies that connect with the consumer, and move them to a tighter connection. • Execution fits into the consumer’s life, and works to getting consumers to think, feel and act in a certain way that lines up to the chosen strategy. © Beloved Brands Inc. 1 2 3 4 5 54Page
  • 55. Brands have four strategic choices: they can be better, different, cheaper or not around for very long. Graham Robertson We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 56. What consumers want What your competitor does best What your brand does best Map out consumer needs against what you and your competitor does best We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Winning zone: your brand’s clear difference matters to consumers Losing zone: competitor meets consumers needs better than you Risky zone: equally meet consumer needs. You win through speed, innovation and emotional connection Dumb zone: Competitive battle where consumer doesn’t care at all 56Page
  • 57. What is the core strength your brand can win on? Model forces you to pick one core strength, two at the middle point and forces you to have one that falls to the Low level. • Focus on superiority • Invest in Innovation • Rational advertising • Focus on being different • Invest in Communication • Emotional advertising • Focus on people/culture • Invest in training/values • Influencer/Social Media • Focus on efficiency/low cost/volume • Invest in production/sourcing • Call to Action Advertising We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Product Concept/Idea ExperienceLow Price L M H 57Page
  • 58. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Consumers: Define and measure your target • As you figure out where you are playing, defining who you are serving and who you aren’t serving helps provide focus. • Ongoing measurement and adjusting should look at how well you are doing versus your target in terms of share, preference, purchase intention, brand funnel scores and panel data. As well you should track your research against the target and mass population. • In terms of choosing target segments, you can break it out on the following: • Demographics • Behavioral or Psychographic • Geographic • Usage occasion Target Everyone NotNot A good target not only decides who is in your target but who is not in your target. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 58Page
  • 59. Target and insights What do consumers want? Brand features What does your brand do? Rational benefits What do consumers get? Emotional benefits How does that make them feel? Define consumer Define target, need states, enemies and insights. Rational benefits In consumer’s voice, answer, “so, what do I get?” We use a customer value proposition ladder to find emotional benefits Product features Product-focused strengths, claims, differences or unique offerings. 1 3 2 Emotional benefits Look at rational benefit, asking, “so how does that make me feel?” 4 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 59Page
  • 60. I’m curious for knowledge I feel optimistic I want to be in control I am comfortable I want to be myself Our consumer Motivated Special Successful Inspired Excited Interesting Alive Cool Playful Popular Trendy Likeable Friendly Intimate Happy Easy-going Nurtured Compassion Down-to--earth RelaxedHonest Family Trust Safe Respect Reliable Knowledge Wisdom Smarter Competent I want to feel liked I want to feel free © Hotspex Inc We use an “Emotional cheat sheet” for brands I want to be noticed We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 60Page
  • 61. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Tie it together with a winning brand positioning statement Target Benefit Reason to believe Category Reference 61Page
  • 62. Make consumers want what you make Make what consumers want We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 63. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Creating a BIG IDEA for your brand, should drive everything on the brand, including advertising. *First Exposed to DNA Tool at Level5 Strategy BC DA A B C D • Brainstorm 3-4 words or a tight phrase in each of the four sections. • Collectively begin to frame the Brand’s Big Idea with a few words or a phrase We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 63Page
  • 64. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Examples of how the BIG IDEA model works NFL Players Inc. Special K Brand Personality Products & Services Internal Beacon Consumer Views We create winning a brand positioning, brand plans that everyone can follow and find advertising that drives brand growth. With 20 years of CPG Marketing experience, it’s like having a VP Marketing in the room. We bring a sound planning process with provocative tools that make you think different. We will provoke you to think different. We coach when you feel stuck and when you want to push when you want to push to reach your full potential. Big Idea: We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Passion in marketing Matters. We believe the more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand will be. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 64Page Beloved Brands
  • 65. Five Questions answered in the Communications Strategy, help you with the Communications Brief Five Questions in the Brand Communications Strategy Who Do We want to sell to? (Target) What are we selling? (Benefit) And Why should they believe us? (Reason To Believe) What Do We want the Communications to do for the brand? (Brand Strategy) What do Want people to think, feel or do? (Desired Response) What’s the long range feeling the brand evokes (Big Idea) Communications Brief 1.What is the objective? 2.What’s the Consumer Problem We are Addressing 3.Who are you talking to? 4.Consumer Insights 5.What does our consumer think now? 6.What do you want your consumer to think/feel/do? (Desired Response) 7.What should we tell them? (Stimulus: benefit) 8.Why should they believe us? 9.Brand Positioning Statement 10.Tone and Manner 11.Media Options 12.Mandatories 1 4 2 3 + 3 5 21 + 5 5 4 © Beloved Brands Inc. 2 4 1 4 2 3 5 We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 65Page
  • 66. When you don’t have much time, it doesn’t mean avoid writing a brief, it just means using The Mini Brief The Mini Communications Brief Objective Launch new Facebook page to drive trial among a younger audience. Target “Proactive Preventers”, women 35-40, live a healthy lifestyle but still cheat once in a while. Consumer Insights “Cookies are my weakness, the enemy of my diet, but I love them” Desired Response We want consumers to try Grays and experience the unbelievable taste. What We’ll Tell Them Grays Cookies are the best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. You have to try it to believe it. You should never do the “phone call brief” because when you try to cut corners and go too fast, it actually takes longer. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 66Page
  • 67. Consumer centric strategies deliver six elements of good strategy Connect with the Big Idea, more than product. Target those who love you the most, focus on connecting. Use loyal users to drive awareness among new consumers Be seen as different to separate consumers, create a following and drive the momentum behind that following. Become a beloved brand, tightly connected following of loyal consumers with high sales growth and profit margins. Focus on consumer trends and insights to connect, become part of the consumers life (routines, rituals), understand how they think and feel about your brand in order to know how to move them along the Love curve. Tight connection transforms the positioning power of your brand, using that power versus consumers, competitors, customers, employees, media and key influencers. The tight connection and power, allows you to drive market share, move into new categories, command premium pricing, and lower costs. The end result is a high growth, high margin business that creates value for the brand. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 67Page
  • 68. Competitive Strategy 2 Leader Challenger Flanker Guerrilla
  • 69. Borrowing from Napoleon’s Warfare Strategies X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Strategy # 1: Where there is opportunity to win against their strength, ATTACK THEIR STRENGTH, then the weak area will be that much easier. First attack their strength by focusing all resources to out-number them at the point of attack, using added element of speed/surprise 1 2 1 Then easily go after remaining weak points. Once the strength is broken, it will be easier to win X X 2 Napoleon talks about pin-pointed attacks, deployment and efficiency of resources. How can you apply these rules to your brand?
  • 70. Borrowing from Napoleon’s Warfare Strategies X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Strategy # 2: Where there is limited opportunity to win against their strength ATTACK THEIR WEAKNESS, as they mobilize their strength as it comes to help. Pin-pointed attack of their weak area forcing your opponent to spread out their strength in an attempt to defend. 1 2 1 Then launch a 2nd attack on the dispersed strength using speed and situational adjustments before your opponent can adjust. X X X X X X X X X 2 Napoleon took pride in a confused opponent, mapping out every possible scenario, knowing what opponents would do even before they did. Do you know what your competitor will do next?
  • 71. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. You need to understand what competitive situation you face and how intense it is Leader (defensive): Leader of category or sub- category defending their territory by attacking itself or even attacking back at an aggressive competitor. Challenger (offensive): Challenger’s attack on the leader to exploit a weakness or build on your own strength. Flanking: An attack in an open area where the Leader is not that well established. Guerilla: Go to an area where it’s too small for the Leaders to take notice or are unable to attack back. 1 2 3 4 71Page
  • 72. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. As the leader, the best offense is a good defense Defensive Strategies 1. Defensive strategies should be pursued by the leader. Not only the market share leader, but the perceived leader in the consumers’ mind. 2. Attacking yourself is the best defense. Identify and close leaks in service, experience or products. Introduce new products superior to your current. Challenge the culture to step it up to continually get better and stay ahead of the competitors. Can’t be complacent or you’ll die. 3. Leader blocks all offensive moves. Keep an eye on your competitors moves—and adjust your own brand to ensure you defend against their attacks. 4. Attack back with an even greater force than the one attacking you. Demonstrate your brand power. Leverage all the brand power you’ve mustered to maintain your positional power. 72Page Great Leaders own what they are best at, as well as where they are parity with competitors Defend Conquer
  • 73. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Defensive Strategy Options Available Evaluate your own strengths against the threat of your attacker and choose one of the defensive options. Positive Strategies Hold onto customers by emphasizing your brand’s natural strengths— perceived and real. Parity Strategies Hold onto customers by matching blunting, neutralizing the perceived strengths of your attacker. Delay Defections Downplay attackers strengths and slow defection down until you can address your gaps. Entrench Realizing you might lose some, focus on those most capable of loving you for your strengths. Leverage your own Strengths Mitigate your Competitors Strengths Retain Customers Slow Customer Losses 73Page
  • 74. Case Studies of Good/Bad Defensive Strategies McDonald’s, under attack by Subway’s weight loss claims and the movie “Super Size Me”, launched a full array of salads & sandwiches, changed their happy meal to appeal to healthy moms, and voluntarily put calorie counts on their menu. Since Super Size me, they’ve seen double- digit growth when everyone thought it was in trouble. Blackberry forgot to defend their Castle. In 2009, Blackberry dominated the B2B executive market. But they wanted to be more like Apple than like themselves. They launched a bad touch screen phone, an undifferentiated tablet, sponsored rock concerts and launched BBI for teenie-boppers. They never attacked themselves by improving the flaws of their current product or defended their strength with corporations. Pretty soon, executives were switching to the iPhone. The best leaders attack themselves before they are at risk from attack We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 74Page
  • 75. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Offensive attack finding weakness in the leader Offensive Strategies 1. Best offensive attack is to actually find weakness within the Leader’s strengths. Turn a perceived strength around is very powerful. Attack a weakness might be insufficient. 2. Be careful of the Leader’s Defensive moves. Anticipate a response with full force—possibly even greater than yours. Avoid wars that drain resources and hold same share after the war. 3. Attack on as narrow of a front as possible to ensure your resources are put to that area— which might be more force than the leader puts to that one area. Narrow attacks are effective when the leader tries to be all things to all people— enabling you to slice off a part of their business before they can defend it. 4. Leapfrog Strategy, technology and business models are game-changers in the category. 75Page Focus on the area you are better than your competitor and then extrapolate that feature’s importance with consumers Make what you do seem bigger Diminish what they do
  • 76. Case Studies of Good Offensive Strategies McDonald’s attacked Starbuck on the super price premium and an aggressive call out that “four bucks is dumb” that tapped into the indulgence of Starbucks in a tough economy. (McDonald’s coffee is not much cheaper than Starbucks) The Pepsi Challenge was a direct offensive attack on Coke. Without the strength of the Coke brand name and all that went with it, people picked Pepsi in blind taste tests, preferring the sweeter taste. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 76Page
  • 77. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Flanker strategies force you to the safe ground Flanking Strategies 1. Flanker Strategies go to uncontested areas, in the safety where the leader is not competing. Make sure you are the first in this area. 2. Speed and surprise can help win the uncontested area before the Leaders take notice. Make your move quickly and stealthfully. 3. Follow through natters, to defend the area you’ve won. Others may follow—whether it’s the leader trying to use their might or copy cats looking for an early win. 4. You can win with new targets, price points (premium or value), distribution channels, format or positioning. 5. Flanking, while lower risk of attack from the leader, is a higher risk with consumers because innovation is always riskier because consumers might not like the concept. 77Page
  • 78. Volvo: As car brands focused on speed, style, features, Volvo focused on safety in the 1940s/50s. As the brand owned that niche, and as safety became a more important car feature, Volvo was able to grow along with the trend. Special K Challenge: As most cereal was targeting families, facing complaints of high sugar and calories, Special K established itself as a lower calorie and weight loss option. Case Studies of Good Flanker Strategies We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 78Page
  • 79. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Guerrilla warfare wins where no one notices or cares 1. Pick a segment small enough that it won’t be noticed and you’ll be able to defend it. Be aggressive. Put all your resources against this small area, so that you’ll have the relative force of a major player. 2. Be flexible and nimble. You’ll need to enter quickly to seize an opportunity that others aren’t noticing, but also be ready to exit if need be— whether the consumers change their minds or competitors see an opportunity to enter. 3. Explore non-traditional marketing techniques to get your brand message out and your brand into the market quickly. Because you’re playing in a non-traditional market, you’ll be given leeway on the tools you use. 4. For Guerrilla brands, it is better to be loved by the few, than liked or tolerated by many. 79Page Niche Stick to an area so small, that your competitors can’t even be bothered trying to compete in
  • 80. Case Studies of Good Guerrilla Strategies Dollar Shave: With a multi-billion dollar shaving market dominated by two players, and a big consumer complaint about the cost of razors, Dollar Shave found a nice niche on line where they send out cheap razors through a prescription model. Makes $10-20 million + per year, not worth it for Gillette to bother. In-N-Burger or 5 Guys Burgers and even gourmet local burger places. Avoid taking on the big fast food chains directly, preferring to go into the high quality, fresh ingredients at a super premium price ($8-10 for a burger) We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 80Page
  • 81. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Marketing Warfare Rules for Success 1. Speed of attack matters. Surprise attacks, but sustained speed in the market is a competitive advantage. 2. Be organized and efficient in your management. To operate at a higher degree of speed, ensure that surprise attacks work without flaw, be mobile enough. 3. Focus all your resources to appear bigger and stronger than you are. Focus on the target most likely to quickly act, focus on the messaging most likely to motivate and focus on areas you can win. Drawn out dog fights slows down brand growth. Never fight two wars at once. 4. Use early wins to keep momentum going and gain quick positional power you can maintain and defend counter-attacks. 5. Execution matters. Quick breakthrough requires creativity in your approach and quality in execution. 6. Expect the unexpected. Think it through thoroughly. Map out potential responses by competitors. 81Page
  • 82. How Competitive Strategies deliver on the Six Elements of Good Strategy Focus on one competitor, and figure out which weakness you are going to exploit. Alignment of all your resources against one pressure point will enable you to feel bigger than you are. More power. Breakthrough and see potential ownership of target consumer, message or strategy, and see the start of a share gain versus competitors. Grow market share, establish positioning and battle to win against competitors. Speed of attack enables you to get to consumers with your message before your competitor is ready to react. Be organized and flexible as you’ll need to react to a counter-attack by your competitor. Once you achieve the win, can you sustain the win against counter attacks. Can you take that win and use your new positional power to transform it into something even bigger? Taking on your new share position to drive further gains against a weakened competitor. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 82Page
  • 83. Situational Strategy 3 Continue Momentum Turn Around Re-Focus Start Up
  • 84. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Strategy depends on the situation brand is facing Continued Momentum: Sales growth and profitability in good shape, team is aligned on direction for the future. Underlying brand metrics and relationships beyond organization are strong. Keep business going strong. Turnaround: Continuing decline in sales, being attacked by competitors or category shrinking. Margin squeeze, either due to price/cost or the shrinking sales line. Downward momentum over 2-3 years. Lack of alignment, internally or externally, on future solutions. Get business back on track. Re-Focus: Circumstances on business have changed, driven through either external market forces or internal dynamics to the point where there is now a lack of alignment on the direction or next steps for the brand. Start Up: Getting a new brand into he market, or launching a current brand into new categories of innovation. Organization needs setting up (team, culture, structure, values, behaviors) Need focused strategic Investment choices to get brand going. 1 2 3 4 84Page
  • 85. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Continuing the momentum 1. Do not make quick changes: prior leader likely revered/promoted, your team may not respond/may resist any need for change. 2. You have to adjust to the culture and team: use the time to learn the ways behind the success. Resist temptation to change because it does not match to what you are used to. Don’t make them adjust to you. 3. Leverage strong growth/profit to attack competitors: Use your brand power options to your advantage to accelerate the momentum. 4. Continue to fuel what’s working: Invest behind the drivers of the business and make adjustments to market dynamics 5. Attack small weaknesses: Continuing momentum does not mean be blind to your gaps. Now is a time to close them. Fuel growth drivers, while resisting temptation for wholesale change 1 85Page
  • 86. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Need for a turnaround on the brand 1. Right people in place: Before even creating the plan, you need to get the right leadership talent in place. Talent, motivation, alignment. 2. Look to close leaks on the Brand: Use brand funnel to assess, using leaky bucket tool (next page) to close leaks. 3. Cut the fat, re-invest: go through every investment decision, invest only in programs that give you an early break through win. 4. 3 stage plan: In stage 1, find early/obvious win, halts slide, helps motivation. In stage 2, invest behind new positioning/new plan, focused decisions, take risks. In stage 3, make adjustments to plan, build innovation behind new ideas that fit plan. 5. Motivating a demotivated team: Losing can be contagious to a culture/team. Recognize wins to fuel performance driven culture. Change the direction: New people, new plan, new ideas, new attitude. 2 86Page
  • 87. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 1. Get everyone on the same page: deep dive analysis to gain agreement on issues, create brand positioning, develop plan everyone can follow and make investment decisions based on fact/opportunity. 2. Alignment of the team: establish values and benchmarks for behavior to achieve the results. 3. Return behind our strengths: look to past successful strategies, positioning, and execution. Validate to see if they still hold true. 4. A return to the fundamentals: make fundamentals a key norm in the behavior of the team. Invest in training to make sure talent has skills. 5. Smart decisions, smart execution: Instill focus into decision-making. Simplify the execution, aligned to strategy, zero waste. Re-focus everyone on what matters the most Re-focus the team. Align the Brand (positioning, plan) and the Culture. (values, behaviors) 3 87Page
  • 88. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 1. Create a big Idea, instead of just a product: the first mistake most start ups make is believing product alone is good enough. Consumers connect with ideas more than products—especially in a crowded market. 2. Build team: always crucial to build the right team based on the right timing. Fit people to the strategy, not strategy to the people. 3. Building capabilities: acquire skills, relationships, capacity to fit the brand plan and execution. 4. Blowfish marketing: focused decisions make you look bigger than you are. Resist temptation to do everything all at once and focus on what is needed at the right timing. 5. Learn and adjust: new brands need to be constantly maneuvering, without leaving their overall vision or strategy. Make sure you start right on a start up Moving from blank slate to big idea, plan and team. Focus Focus Focus! 4 88Page
  • 89. Purpose driven strategy 3
  • 90. “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it” Simon Sinek Author The Power of Why
  • 91. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. A purpose driven vision can help explain and connect based on “why you do what you do” Why How What Strategy Apple Why do you exist? What’s your Purpose or Cause? At Apple, we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe in thinking differently. Making a dent in the universe. How we deliver against the Purpose or Cause? To challenge the status quo, at Apple, we make sure our products are all beautifully designed, simple to use and user friendly. What do you do to deliver the purpose? Sell computers, laptops, cell phones, tablets that are highly stylized and consumer friendly. Start with what’s in you: The most successful brands start with a purpose driven vision (why) and match the strategies (how) and the execution (what) to the purpose. 91Page
  • 92. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. How the purpose driven brand vision drives through the organization Why How What Executive Team Management Staff of Subject Matter Experts Strategy Organization The Why is the Vision, Mission and Values. It is owned by executive teams. The How is the Strategy and Tactics in the plan, and is owned by Management. The What is the Execution and Delivery of the Vision. It’s owned by front line employees and culture. 92Page
  • 93. How Purpose Driven Strategies deliver on the Six Elements of Good Strategy You need to understand what is the main purpose behind your business and be able to map out the why, how and what you do. It may feel backwards because it doesn’t start with the consumer—it starts with you. It helps to understand and convey what your brand is all about. When you mobilize your company behind the purpose driven vision, you’ll start to see the Brand DNA play out in all facets of the brand. Reach deep to understand the self-fulfilling idea of why you do it. Not as fast as consumer or competitive driven strategies. You have to get consumers to connect with your purpose and figure out how to monetize. Match up what you do, to the needs of consumers ensures you aren’t operating in a vacuum, but that you’re ready to drive success into the market. When you can see monetizing your purpose driven brand vision down to the strategy (the how) and the execution (the what) We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. 93Page
  • 94. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 95. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Brand Coaching We promise to make your brand better by digging deep on the issues, challenge your thinking on strategies, lead the team towards creating a plan everyone can follow and adding wisdom and magic in finding a winning brand positioning that unleashes your brand’s full potential. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Brand Leader Training We promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by using sound marketing fundamentals that are shown in a modern way. We will push your team to reach for greatness and unleash their full talent potential.
  • 96. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Create a winning brand positioning. Write plans that everyone can follow. Find advertising that drives brand growth. Make your team of brand leaders better. Beloved Brands can help you in four ways 1 2 3 4
  • 97. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Create a winning brand positioning Beloved Brands Inc. 55 Bridewell Cres., Richmond Hill, ON Canada L4C 9C3 T: 416-885-3911 E: graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com CREATIVE BRIEF FOR GRAY’S COOKIES 1. Why Are We Advertising · Drive awareness and consideration of the new Grays Cookies as “The Healthy Choice to Snacking” brand positioning. 2. What’s the Consumer Problem We are Addressing · Cookies are my enemy. I’m always watching what I eat. And then BAM, I see a cookie and I’m done. As much as I look after myself, I still like to sneak a cookie now and then. 3. Who are you talking to? · “Proactive Preventers”. They do whatever it takes to stay healthy, they run, workout and eat right. Women, 25-45 with bulls-eye target of 35-40. For many, Food can be a bit of a stress-reliever and escape even for people who watch what they eat. 4. Consumer Insights · “I have tremendous will-power. I work out 3x a week, watch what I eat and maintain my figure. But we all have weaknesses and cookies are mine. I just wish they were less bad for you” · “I read labels of everything I eat. I stick to 1500 calories per day, and will find my own ways to achieve that balance. If I eat a 400 calorie cookie, it may mean giving something up.” · “I shop at Whole Foods and love to explore the new items. The last few years, there have been some tremendous advances in making great tasting options—in a healthy package.” 5. What does our consumer think now? · I’ve never heard of Grays Cookies. But I’d likely need to try it and see if I like it. If it really does taste that good, it’s something I might consider as a snack. 6. What do you want your consumer to think/feel/do? (Desired Response) · We want them to try Grays and see if they like the great taste. 7. What should we tell them? (Stimulus: benefit) · Grays Cookies are the best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. You have to try it to believe it. 8. Why should they believe us? · Grays combines the great taste in a low fat and calorie sensible cookie. In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. · In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. · Grays uses all natural ingredients. 9. Tone and Manner · Successful. Motivated. Reliable. In Control. Natural. 10. Media Options · Main creative will be in specialty health magazines, event OOH signage and in-store. Want to carry the idea into digital, social media and a microsite. 11. Mandatories · The line: “best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure” must be included in the spot. · 25% of Print must carry the Whole Foods logo as part of our listing agreement. · Legal disclaimer on the taste test and the 12-week study. Creative BriefThe Big Idea 1 We use a workshop style process that helps your team find a winning brand positioning, pushing the emotional benefits. We can validate with consumers through a testable brand concept. We’ll work to create a Big Idea that frames the external and internal promise of your brand. We’ll leave you with an execution ready creative brief to hand to your agency. Customer Value Proposition Positioning Statement I’m curious for knowledge I feel optimistic I want to be in control I am comfortable I want to be myself Our consumer Mo vated Special Successful Inspired Excited Interes ng Alive Cool Playful Popular Trendy Likeable Friendly In mate Happy Easy-going Nurtured Compassion Down-to--earth RelaxedHonest Family Trust Safe Respect Reliable Knowledge Wisdom Smarter Competent I want to feel liked I want to feel free © Hotspex Inc “Emo onal cheat sheet” for brands I want to be noticed Emotional Cheat Sheet Brand Concept Mapping 5 Connectors We coach brand leaders on creating a brand idea and brand positioning that will help your brand win in the market.
  • 98. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Write brand plans everyone can follow2 We work with your team to dig deep to uncover the key issues. We use a workshop style process to help your team lay out a long range strategic road map and brand plan that everyone in your organization can follow. We then work with your team to create actionable project plans for each tactic with goals, milestones and budget. Purpose Worksheet Summary for wri ng of a Brand Plan Goals Values Tac cal Plan Strategy Key Issues • At Apple, we want to make a dent in the universe by challenging the status quo and thinking differently. • We believe equally in art and technology. • Apple wants everyone in the world to be part of the future. • Consumer first • Simplicity and ease-of-use • Stylish designs • Fast-to-market • Community • Con nue 10% sales growth • Double market share in Asia, • Launch 5 new technologies per year. Regain Leadership in Smart Phone technology Geographic focus into China Build around Cloud technology High service to ghten Apple community • Size op ons • Win on design • Launch watch • Specific products • Brand Building • New retail space • Launch into TVs • Integrate retail purchasing • Take services online • Increase courses • New retail spaces • How do we ba le Samsung/Google in smart phones? • How do we expand our growth beyond a fla ening North American market? • Where will the next round of innova on come from? • How do we strengthen bond with our most loyal Apple users? Using Apple as an Example Promise: We make it so easy to use electronics, that you will feel smarter and at the leading edge of technology Experience: Apple starts with the consumer experience & works back to the technology, elimina ng frustra ons. Story: Technology shouldn’t be in mida ng or frustra ng. We make it simple enough so you can be engaged right away. Freshness: Surprising technology that changes the world. Every product is stylish, simple, easy to use & leap frogged compe tors. Strategy: Technology with stylish designs made simple & consumer friendly stretching across a broad array of electronics products. Purpose: At Apple, we want to make a dent in the universe by challenging the status quo and thinking differently. We believe equally in art and technology. Brand Vision: Apple wants everyone in the world to be part of the future. Brand Strategy Road Map for the Future Values: Consumer first, simplicity and ease-of-use, stylish designs, fast-to-market, community. Goals: Con nue 10% sales growth, double market share in Asia, launch 5 new technologies per year. Strategies: Regain Lead in Smart Phone Technology Geographic focus into China Build around Cloud technology High service to ghten Apple community Tac cs: • Size op ons • Win on design • Launch watch • Specific products • Brand Building • New retail space • Launch into TVs • Integrate retail purchasing • Take services online • Increase courses • New retail spaces The Big Idea: Apple makes technology so SIMPLE that everyone can be part of the future © Beloved Brands Inc. Brand Assessment Con nue/Enhance • Stay focused on things going right, accelerate against them. Con nuous improvement. Minimize/Reverse • Close the leaks, develop turnaround plans or re-focus the team against the trend. Take Advantage of • Build plans to mobilize the brand to see if the opportunity is a winning space for the brand. Avoid/Con ngency • Iden fy and measure the risk, explore plans to avoid. Fill the gap before a compe tor. What’s Inhibi ng the Growth? What are the untapped Opportuni es? What are the Threats? What’s Driving the Growth? Defining Key Issues Strategy Worksheet Idea Evaluation Strategic Road Map 1 Year Brand Plan Project Plans We coach Brand Leaders to build highly focused strategic brand plans that everyone in your organization can follow
  • 99. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Find advertising that drives brand growth Advertising AdviceProvocative Voice Agency Search 3 Advertising Audit We work with your brand team and agency to find advertising that drives growth on your brand. We conduct advertising audits to help uncover better processes for your team. With a provocative voice, we provide advice at every stage of the advertising process from assessing creative briefs through judging advertising ideas to final production. We also provide agency evaluation and lead search processes. We coach brand leaders and agencies at every stage so they can to create better advertising to drive growth on your brands
  • 100. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Make your team of brand leaders better4 Strategic Thinking Brand Plans Positioning Statements Creative Briefs Brand Analysis Better Advertising Media Plans How to Run Your Brand Managing your Marketing Career Motivational Lunch and Learns 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 “Graham makes Brand Leaders. His boot camp style instruction is perfect for the development of anyone in brand management. He challenges you to be better, makes you question your decisions with rigor and provides the right level of coaching to bring you to the next level.” Program Participant We created the Brand Leadership Center to address the core marketing fundamentals that a brand leader needs to be successful. We can customize training programs to the needs of your team with a strong menu of interactive brand leadership workshops
  • 101. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. We like that our clients speak on our behalf “Beloved Brands assisted us in the transformation of our brand positioning and company culture. Graham helped steer people towards finding their own solutions and owning them, as opposed to just giving people the answers.” Keith Gordon President, NFL Players Inc. “Beloved Brands has been a tremendous asset to Earls. They helped us to uncover a new vision, big idea for the Earls brand and strategic business plan. We were so pleased with the results, we used Beloved Brands to develop Earls’ cultural brand service values which were rolled out to all 6000+ employees.” Monique Gomel VP Marketing, Earls Restaurants
  • 102. Graham is one of the voices of the modern brand leader. He started Beloved Brands, knowing he could make brands better and brand leaders better. Graham believes passion matters in marketing, because the more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand will be. Graham spent 20 years in brand management leading some of the world’s most beloved brands at Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer, General Mills and Coke, rising through the ranks up to VP Marketing. Graham played a major role in helping Pfizer win Marketing Magazine’s Marketer of the Year award. He has an MBA from the Ivey Business School, ranked the #1 International business school by Business Week. As a Brand Coach, he can help you create a winning positioning statement for your brand, write a brand plan everyone can follow, find advertising that drives growth and train your team of Brand Leaders on everything marketing. The client roster for Beloved Brands includes the NFL Players Association, Reebok, Pfizer Capital One, 3M, Sun Products and Earls. Graham’s weekly blog (beloved-brands.com) has a vast following with over 3 million views, and his public speaking appearances inspire brand leaders to love what they do. Graham Robertson • Beloved Brands We make brands better. We make brand leaders better.
  • 103. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. At Beloved Brands, we promise to make your brand better and make your brand leaders better. We believe passion matters, because the more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand will be. We will challenge you to think different, because the thinking that got you here may not get you to the next level. Our Credo Brand Personality Products & Services Internal Beacon Consumer Views We create winning a brand positioning, brand plans that everyone can follow and find advertising that drives brand growth. With 20 years of CPG Marketing experience, it’s like having a VP Marketing in the room. We bring a sound planning process with provocative tools that make you think different. We will provoke you to think different. We coach when you feel stuck and when you want to push when you want to push to reach your full potential. Big Idea: We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. Passion in marketing Matters. We believe the more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand will be. The Big Idea behind Beloved Brands We started Beloved Brands knowing that we could make brands better and brand leaders better.
  • 104. We make brands better. We make brand leaders better. LOVE IT INDIFFERENT BELOVED LIKE IT Brands move along Love curve1 Promise Experience Story FreshnessStrategy Connect to build love in 5 ways Brand Consumer 2 Brand Power Media Consumers Influencers Culture Channels Competitors Suppliers New Entrants Love creates sources of power3Power drives profit in 8 ways4 We believe passion matters, because the more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable it will be. Higher Margin % 1 2Premium Price Trading Up Stealing share Get loyal Users to use more 5 6 3 Lower Cost of Goods Efficient Spend4 7 8 Enter New Markets Find New Uses Price Cost Share Market Size Higher Volume
  • 105. We would love the opportunity to help you to make your brand better. We love what we do and we know that it shows at every stage of the project. Graham Robertson • Beloved Brands • 416 885 3911 • graham@beloved-brands.com