Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

How to make decisions on advertising that drives brand link

375 views

Published on

Brand leaders who are good at advertising can get great ads on the air and keep bad ads off the air.

You need to make decisions to find the sweet spot where your brand’s advertising is both different and smart.

To be different, you need to achieve a branded breakthrough, using creativity to capture consumers. Gain their attention amid the market clutter and link your brand closer to the story.

To be smart, you need a motivating message to communicate the main message memorable to connect with consumers, and make the ad stick enough to move them to see, think, feel, or act differently than before they saw the ad.

In our Beloved Brands book, I outline principles for achieving attention, brand link, communication, and stickiness—the model I call the ABC’s. I show examples of some of the best ads in the history of branding to support those principles. I hope to challenge your thinking about your brand’s advertising.

Brand link is not just about more of your brand, but rather the right engagement of your brand, and the placement of your brand. Sometimes less is more, when you tell stories.

This type of thinking is in my Beloved Brands book, can be found on Amazon https://lnkd.in/eF-mYPe or on Apple Books: https://lnkd.in/ekQ-n9X

Published in: Marketing
  • 7 Sacred "Sign Posts" From The Universe Revealed. Discover the "secret language" the Universes uses to send us guided messages and watch as your greatest desires manifest before your eyes. Claim your free report.  http://scamcb.com/manifmagic/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Does Penis Size REALLY Matter? The truth comes out...  https://tinyurl.com/yy3nfggr
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

How to make decisions on advertising that drives brand link

  1. 1. How to make decisions on advertising that drives brand link Brand leaders who are good at advertising can get great ads on the air and keep bad ads off the air. You need to make decisions to find the sweet spot where your brand’s advertising is both different and smart. To be different, you need to achieve a branded breakthrough, using creativity to capture consumers. Gain their attention amid the market clutter and link your brand closer to the story. To be smart, you need a motivating message to communicate the main message memorable to connect with consumers, and make the ad stick enough to move them to see, think, feel, or act differently than before they saw the ad. In our Beloved Brands book, I outline principles for achieving attention, brand link, communication, and stickiness—the model I call the ABC’s. I show examples of some of the best ads in the history of branding to support those principles. I hope to challenge your thinking about your brand’s advertising. Brand link is not just about more of your brand, but rather the right engagement of your brand, and the placement of your brand. Sometimes less is more, when you tell stories. Moreover with each of the ABC’s, when you dial branding up too far, it can negatively impact the attention or the communication, which destroys the overall ad. Try to find your balance. 

  2. 2. The thinking behind great advertising The best advertising must balance being creatively different and strategically smart. When ads are smart but not different, they get lost in the clutter. It is natural for marketers to tense up when the creative work ends up being “too different.” In all parts of the business, marketers are trained to look for past proof as a sign something will work. However, when it comes to advertising if the ads start too similar to what other brands have already done, then the advertising will be at risk of boring your consumers, so you never stand out enough to capture their attention. Push your comfort with creativity and take a chance to ensure your ad breaks through. When ads are different but not smart, they will entertain consumers, but do nothing for your brand. Your advertising must be smart enough to trigger the desired consumer response to match your brand strategy. 
 The playbook for how to create The thinking behind great advertising Smart but not different Solid strategy, but no creativity Will do OK. Won’t break through clutter to make a difference. Different and smart Creativity helps breakthrough. Solid strategy motivates consumers to take action Not smart and not different Brand is lost and floundering. Conservative creative against a weak strategy. Different but not smart Creative for the sake of it. Misses strategy: wrong target, message, or desired response. Smart Not Smart The same Different Strategy Creativity
  3. 3. How to predict advertising success We have to take the smart and creative advertising to a predictive advertising model, changing the creatively different to branded breakthrough, and the smart strategy becomes motivating consumers. The branded breakthrough is “how you say it.” It uses creativity to capture the consumer’s attention within the clutter of the market while linking your brand closer to the story. The motivating message is “what you say.” You have to communicate the main message to connect with consumers memorably, so the ad sticks enough to move consumers to see, think, feel, or act differently than before they saw the ad. Branded Breakthrough + Motivate Consumers = Attention + Brand Link + Communication + Stickiness !3 The playbook for how t brand your consumer How to predict advertising success Branded Breakthrough + Motivate Consumers = Attention + Brand Link + Communication + Stickiness Branded BreakthroughLow High High Motivate Consumers Very Poor Ad weak on both motivation and breakthrough Poor Ad is ok on motivation but weak on breakthrough Concern Ad is strong on motivation but weak on breakthrough Strong Ad is strong on motivation, and ok on breakthrough Poor Ad is ok on breakthrough but weak on motivation Moderate Ad is ok on both motivation and breakthrough Very Strong Ad is high on both breakthrough and motivation Strong Ad strong on breakthrough and ok on motivation Concern Ad is strong on breakthrough but weak on motivation
  4. 4. The ABC’s model for advertising decisions In our Beloved Brands book, I go through the principles of the ABC’s model, with examples for each principle. I use the Attention-Branding-Communication-Stickiness model as a great checklist to ensure the ad will be successful. When judging advertising, the most important thing I look for is to ensure the creative idea within the ad that drives the attention, tells the brand story, communicates the main benefit and sticks in the consumer's mind. When you see a story, device, copy, or a visual that does not fit with the delivery, then you have a red flag. You run the risk that the creativity of the ad works against your objectives. Here are four questions to ask: • Is it the creative idea that earns the consumer’s attention for the ad? • Is the creative idea helping to drive maximum brand involvement? • Is the creative idea setting up the communication of the main consumer benefit? • Is the creative idea memorable enough to stick in the consumer’s mind and move them to purchase? The playbook for how to create a brand your consumers will love Make your advertising decisions with our ABC’s Stickiness Ads that stick need to be memorable enough to move consumers. Surround your consumer with your creative idea, invest in your assets, engage emotionally, and build a deeper love with those who already love you. Communication The best brand communication happens when you focus on one benefit that moves consumers, creatively amplifying, telling the story behind your purpose, extreme demonstrations or powerful visuals. Brand Link The best brand link comes when you connect your brand closer to the climax of the ad’s story. View your brand through the eyes of your consumer, resonate with consumer insights, make your brand central to the story, and own it. The best brand link scores occur when your brand is not just part of the story but it is the driver of the story itself. Attention The best way to earn the attention of consumers within the cluttered media world is to take a risk. Do something creatively different from what consumers expect, which entertains, takes advantage of the media, and is shareable for consumers to influence others. A B C S Motivate Consumers (What you say to consumers) Branded Breakthrough (How you capture consumers)
  5. 5. How to achieve Brand link The best brand link comes when you connect your brand closer to the climax of the ad’s story. You should view your brand through the eyes of your consumer, resonate with vulnerable consumer insights, make your brand central to the story, and then own it. The highest brand link scores occur when your brand is not just part of the story, but it is the driver of the story itself. There are a couple of myths about what makes strong brand link scores I would like to challenge. The first brand link myth I hear people say: “Make sure the brand name shows up in the first few seconds of your TV ad.” Logically, that thought might make sense. However, it is not true. The Milward Brown Advertising tracking data shows brand linkage is not related to the time at which the brand name first appears in an ad. Looking at data in the chart below, the dotted line at approximately 40% represents the average brand link of all the ads in the Milward Brown database. The specific dots represent the time during a 30-second TV ad when the brand first shows up. The timeline for the ad is at the bottom of the chart. What you can see is a reasonably even distribution above and below the average brand link at most times during the ad. Even for those ads where the brand shows up in the first few seconds have a 50/50 chance of scoring above the brand link average, which is the same success rate when the brand shows up for the first time at the 25-second mark. The second brand link myth I hear is, “The more often you show the brand, the higher brand link scores.” Looking at the Milward Brown chart to the right, it shows no relationship between how often the brand appears in the ad and the resulting brand linkage. The data looks at four choices along the bottom, for the frequency of the brand showing up in the ad, including none, continuous, at key parts, or only at the end. Just like the first myth, there is no correlation between how many times the brand name shows up and how strong your brand link score will be. !5 people say: “Make sure the brand name shows up in the first few seconds of your TV ad.” Percent who recall Brand Time (seconds) before brand first appears 50% 0% 0 10 20 30 Percen who rec Brand The playbook for how to create a The first brand link myth I hear people say: “Make sure the brand name shows up in the first few seconds of your TV ad.” The second brand link myth I hear is, “The more often you show the brand, the higher brand link scores.” 50% 25% Percent who recall Brand Time (seconds) before brand first appears Frequency of Brand in the ad 50% 0% 0 10 20 30 0% None Continuous At key parts Only at end Percent who recall Brand
  6. 6. 1. Make your brand a central part of the story From my experience, it is not how much branding you use, but preferably how closely connected the reveal of the brand is linked with the climax of your ad. “Got milk?” launched a hilarious and engaging storytelling ad with an elaborate tale of an Alexander Hamilton expert. He finds himself on a radio show, ready to answer an easy trivia question about Alexander Hamilton. However, after taking a big bite of his peanut butter sandwich, as he is about to answer, he realizes he is out of milk. With an elaborate story, the reveal of the brand comes at the climax of the story. The “Got milk?” campaign lasted over 20 years. 2. Resonate with meaningful consumer insights Using consumer insights to tell a compelling human-interest story is a great technique to closely connect with your target market, then closely link your brand to the insight. The Always “Like a girl” campaign is an inspirational video that connects with true insight about the perception of how girls run changes as they hit puberty. The ad starts by asking older teens and 20-somethings to run like a girl, and they depict a negative stereotypical overly feminine running style. Then, it asks 10-year- old girls to run like a girl, and they run in a highly athletic manner. It asks what changes to make the older girls see running as a negative. The ad challenges viewers to rethink their stereotypes. It inspires girls with an uplifting message to be themselves and encourages them to believe that, “running like a girl” is a good thing. The Always brand closely lines itself to the insights about the changes happening at puberty, just as moms and daughter will be choosing the feminine hygiene brand they will use.
  7. 7. 3. View the brand through the eyes of your consumer Use emotional stories to demonstrate how the consumer engages your brand. Google had a Super Bowl ad that tells the story of an American student who goes to Paris, meets a girl, maintains a long distance relationship, gets married, lands a job in Paris, and then has a baby. Every part of the story is told by Google searches, which surprise the consumer as they follow the story. The ad shows how much we can use and rely on Google for anything we need in life. Google India launched a beautiful viral ad, which earned millions of YouTube hits. The first time I saw the ad, I cried, even though I could not understand the language, I realized the great storytelling was obvious enough to follow. The ad starts with an elderly Indian man, who tells his granddaughter a story of how he lost touch with his childhood best friend after the partition of India in 1947. With the details of her grandfather's story, the granddaughter locates his childhood friend in Pakistan and connects with the other best friend’s grandson, who is willing to help her to plan a surprise visit for her grandfather’s birthday. Every element of the search and the travel arrangement is done through Google. The brand weaves naturally throughout the ad. 4. Own the story of the brand When telling the story of your brand, make sure to amplify what sets you apart from anyone else. Create a strong visual cue, which you can build over time, big enough to repeat and repeat and repeat. During the turbulent times of the early ‘70s, Coke assembled people on a hill to sing “Teach the world to sing.” Everyone in the commercial was holding a bottle of Coke. This ad spoke to a generation looking for peace and harmony. The ad is one of the best ads of all time. A great example of a high brand link is the McDonald’s Big Mac jingle with a descriptive “Two all beef patties…” song about the brand. It broke through and remains stuck in the consumer’s mind. !7
  8. 8. Making advertising decisions At the decision point, you have three choices: • Approve • Reject • Change From my experience, brand leaders rarely approve creative ideas outright. There also seems a reluctance or fear to reject outright. So marketers mistakenly assume their role is to change the ads. I see too many come to the creative meeting with a pen and paper and start to write feverishly all the recommended changes they have for each ad. The problem is if we marketers are not talented enough to come up with the ad in the first place, why do we think we are talented enough to change the ad? You are a generalist, surrounded by experts. Use your experts. Next time you go into a creative meeting, stop giving the creative team your solutions, and give them a new problem you are seeing and then let the creative team figure out the solutions. If the creative brief is the original “box” for the creative team to figure out the ideal solution, then use your feedback at the creative meeting to create a “new box” for the creative team figure out a new solution. Use your feedback to challenge and create a new problem for your agency to figure out the solution. How to handle yourself at the creative meeting When you are in your next creative advertising meeting, you should think fast with your instincts, while trying to represent your consumer. View the advertising through the eyes of your consumer. Try to see the work how they would see it. I would not even let my agency do a setup to the ads. I said, “Just show me the work as though I see it on TV.” I felt any setup or explanation clouded my judgment and impacted my ability to use my instincts. As you are sitting in that decision-making hot seat at a creative meeting, here are some challenging questions to ask yourself: 1. What does your gut instinct say? • The reality of a marketing job is you might be coming into the creative meeting from a 3-hour forecasting meeting or deep-dive financial review, or you just got back from working in the lab with scientists on a new ingredient. It is not easy to change speeds as you head into a creative meeting. • Relax, find your creative energy, let it soak in, and find those instincts. I created a “gut instincts checklist” to help prompt you for when you need your instincts.
  9. 9. 2. Do you love it? • If you don’t love it, how do you expect your consumer to love it? If you “sorta like” it, then it will be “sorta okay” in the end. But if you love it, you’ll go the extra mile and make it amazing. Ask if you would be proud to have this work as your legacy. 3. Is the advertising on strategy? • Slow down and find some thinking time after the meeting. In a quiet place alone, make sure it delivers on what you wrote in your strategy documents. Go back through the brief to make sure the advertising will deliver the desired response, and the strategic objective statement you wrote in the brand communications plan. One caution is not to use the extra time to over-think the advertising and talk yourself out of a good ad that works. 4. How big is the creative idea? • Is the creative idea big enough to last 5-10 years? Will the idea work across various mediums (paid, earned, social) across all distribution and the entire product line? Think of being so proud of leaving a legacy for your successor to help think about the longer term. Finding your gut instincts Not everyone understands the need for a gut instincts checklist. In fact, it might even sound crazy to some. But, not everyone has faced the challenges of a brand management role. The reality of an average marketing job is you might be coming into a creative meeting from a 3-hour forecasting meeting, deep- dive financial review, or you just got back from working in the lab with scientists on a new ingredient. It is not easy to change brain speeds as you head into a creative meeting. Relax, find your creative energy, let the ideas soak in and find those instincts. I created a Gut Instincts Checklist to prompt you for when you need your instincts.
 !9 The playbook for how to create brand your consumers will lov 1. Do you love the ad? Do you want this to be your legacy? (Passion) 2. Does the Ad express the brand communication strategy? (Brand Plan) 3. Will the ad motivate consumers to do what you want them to do? (see, think, act, feel) 4. Is the Brand Idea the driving force behind all the creative elements? (Brand Idea) 5. Is the Ad engaging enough to break through the clutter? (Attention) 6. Is your brand central and part of the climax of the story of the ad? (Brand Link) 7. Does the Ad communicate your brand’s main benefit? (Communication) 8. How will it stick in the consumer’s mind and move them to purchase? Does it work across various mediums, and with all products? Will it last over time? (Stickiness) Gut Instincts Checklist
  10. 10. How the Beloved Brands playbook can work for you It takes a fundamentally sound marketer to figure out how to win with brand love in this crazy cluttered world of brands. The fundamentals of brand management matter more now than ever. Today’s marketers have become so busy, as they run from meeting to meeting, they have become a little overwhelmed and confused. They have no time to think. Marketing has become about ‘get stuff done,’ never taking the time to stop and ask if it is the right stuff to do. To build a relationship, you must genuinely court your consumer. To move your consumer from stranger to friend and onto the forever stage, you need to think all the time. With the focus on access to big data, marketers are drowning in so much data they do not even have the time to sort through it all to produce the analytical stories that help to make decisions. Marketers are so overwhelmed by the breadth of media choices and the pressure to be everywhere that the quality of the execution has suffered. If marketers do not love the work they create, how can they ever expect the consumer to love the brand? My goal in writing this book is to make you a smarter brand leader so your brand can win in the market. I know your role and the challenges you face. I have been in your shoes. I will share everything I have learned in my 20 years in the trenches of brand management. I want to help you be successful. This book is intended as an actionable “make it happen” playbook, not a theory or opinion book. Beloved Brands is available
  11. 11. Learn to think, define, plan, inspire and analyze 1. How to think strategically Too many marketers are so busy that they do not even have time to think. The best brand leaders do the necessary critical strategic thinking to find ways to win in the market. Strategic thinking is an essential foundation, forcing marketers to ask big questions that challenge and focus brand decisions. I will show you four ways to enhance your strategic thinking, using the brand’s core strength finder, consumer strategy, competitive strategy, and situational strategy. You will learn how to set a vision for your brand, focus your limited resources on breakthrough points, take advantage of opportunities you see in the market, find early wins to leverage to give your brand a positional power to drive growth and profits for your brand. 
 !11 1. Learn new strategic thinking methods, looking at core strength, competitive landscape, consumer relationship, and situation you face. 2. Brand positioning statements start with a consumer profile, uses our consumer benefits ladder with functional and emotional benefits. Then, build out a brand idea that organizes everyone who works on your brand. 3. In teaching brand plans, we go through each element needed for a long- range brand strategy roadmap and your annual brand plan. 4. Learn to make smart and creative decisions that inspires outstanding marketing execution with your creative advertising and media choices. 5. Use brand analytics to write a deep-dive business review, looking at the Strategic Thinking Positioning Statement 2 4 1 Marketing Execution What consumers want What your competitor does best What your brand does best Winning Our marketing training helps realize the full potential of your marketing team Brand Plan 5 The playbook for how to create a brand your consumers will love ✓ How to think strategically ✓ Write a brand positioning statement ✓ Come up with a brand idea ✓ Write a brand plan everyone can follow ✓ Write an inspiring creative brief ✓ Make decisions on marketing execution ✓ Conduct a deep-dive business review ✓ Learn finance 101 for marketers Beloved Brands Beloved Brands is available on Amazon and Apple Books The playbook for how to build a brand your consumers will love. Measuring the brand love, to determine the love, power and profit progress of the brand • Brand funnels become thicker as the brand becomes more loved. It’s not just about driving particular numbers but about moving them from one stage to the next. • Awareness is never enough. Anyone can get that. Consideration is the point you start to see that your brand idea starts to connect and move the consumer. • To drive trial you need to gain consideration first (the brain) and then you need to move the consumer towards purchase and through the experience. • To drive loyalty (the heart) you need to create experiences that deliver the promise and use tools to create an emotional bond with the consumer. Use the brand funnel to measure health Awareness Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal !1 Dad’s wins on innovation and deep price discounts, but is weak on taste. • Dad’s brand is the mature brand in the “good for you” segment holding on average a 25% share over the past 10 years. • Dad’s scores low on taste quality, but higher on innovation than Gray’s, launching 2 new flavors each year. • Dad’s fought declining share with a “buy one get one free” that we decided not to match Gray’s needs to step up on innovation to use superior quality to gain share against Dad’s. 0 2 3 5 6 2018 2019 2020 2021 3.19 3.613.773.99 5.495.395.294.97 Business Review GRAY’S Cookies Exceptional scores among early Adopters (“Proactive Preventers”) making it highly beloved among the niche. • Gray’s is very healthy among “Preventers” with strong awareness at 80% and all related Brand Funnel scores significantly above norm. However, that strength has not carried over to the overall market, where Gray’s is significantly under-developed in the overall market. Explore ways to leverage Love from Preventers, as early adopters, to influence the rest of the market. Preventers Overall Norm Brand Funnel Scores Preventers vs. Overall 0 20 40 60 80 Awareness Gray’s Dad’s Business Review GRAY’S Cookies Exceptional scores among early Adopters (“Proactive Preventers”) making it highly beloved among the niche. • Gray’s is very healthy among “Preventers” with strong awareness at 80% and all related Brand Funnel scores significantly above norm. However, that strength has not carried over to the overall market, where Gray’s is significantly under-developed in the overall market. Explore ways to leverage Love from Preventers, as early adopters, to influence the rest of the market. Preventers Overall Norm Brand Funnel Scores Preventers vs. Overall 0 20 40 60 80 Awareness Average Price per unit 0 22.5 45 67.5 90 2018 2019 2020 2021 Gray’s Dad’s Blind taste test performance Analyze Performance Annual Marketing Plan Analysis Issues and Strategies Execution Plans P&L forecast • Sales $30,385 • Gross Margin $17,148 • GM % 56% • Marketing Budget $8,850 • Contribution Margin $6,949 • CM% 23% Drivers • Taste drives a high conversion of Trial to Purchase • Strong Listings in Food Channels • Exceptional brand health scores among Early Adopters. Highly Beloved Brand among niche. Inhibitors • Low familiar yet to turn our sales into loyalty • Awareness held back due to weak Advertising • Low distribution at specialty stores. Poor coverage. • Low Purchase Frequency among most loyal. Risks • Launch of Mainstream cookie brands (Pepperidge Farms and Nabisco). • De-listing 2 weakest skus weakened our in- store presence • Legal challenge to taste claims Opportunities • R&D has 5 new flavors in development. • Sales Broker gains at Specialty Stores • Use social media to convert loyal following. Key Issues 1.What’s the priority choice for growth: find new users or drive usage frequency among loyalists? 2.Where should the investment/resources focus and deployment be to drive our awareness and share needs for Gray’s? 3.How will we defend Gray’s against the proposed Q1 2014 ‘healthy cookie’ launches from Pepperidge Farms and Nabisco? Strategies 1.Continue to attract new users to Gray’s 2.Focus investment on driving awareness and trial with new consumers and building a presence at retail. 3.Build defence plan against new entrants to defends with consumers and at store level. Goals • Increase penetration from 10% to 12%, specifically up from 15% to 20% with the core target. Monitor usage frequency among the most loyal to ensure it stays steady. • Increase awareness from 33% to 42%, specifically up from 45% to 50% within the core target. Drive trial from 15% to 20%. Close distribution from 62% to 72%. • Hold dollar share during competitive launches. Grow 11% post launch gaining up to 1.2% share. Target zero losses at shelf. Advertising • Use awareness to drive trial of the new Grays. Target “Proactive Preventers”. Suburban working women, 35-40.Main Message of “great tasting cookie without the guilt, so you can stay in control of your health”. Media includes 15 second TV, specialty health magazines, event signage, digital and social media Sampling • Drive trial with In-store sampling at grocery, Costco, health food stores and event sampling at fitness, yoga, women’s networking, new moms. Distribution • Support Q4 retail blitz with message focused on holding shelf space during the competitive launches. Q2 specialty blitz to grow distribution at key specialty stores. Innovation • Launch two new flavours in Q4/15 & Q4/16. Explore diet claims, motivating and own- able. Competitive Defence Plan • Pre Launch sales blitz to shore up all distribution gaps. At launch, heavy merchandising, locking up key ad dates, BOGO. TV, print, coupons, in-store sampling. • Use sales story that any new “healthy” cookies should displace under-performing and declining unhealthy cookies. Brand Vision: Be first ‘healthy cookie’ to generate craving, popularity and sales of a mainstream cookie. $100 Million by 2024. 3 Brand Plans Brand Plan
  12. 12. In our section on strategic thinking, you will learn how to: ✓ Use five elements of smart strategic thinking ✓ Engage our ThinkBox 360-degree strategic thinking model to trigger new questions ✓ Build everything around your brand’s core strength ✓ Think strategically to tighten your brand’s bond with consumers ✓ Think strategically to win the competitive battles you face ✓ Think strategically, within the brand’s current situation ✓ Write strategic objective statements for each of the four strategies 2. How to define your brand positioning Too many marketers are trying to be everything to anyone. This strategy is the usual recipe for becoming nothing to everyone. The best brand leaders target a specific motivated consumer audience and then define their brand around a brand idea that is interesting, simple, unique, motivating, and ownable. I will show you how to write a winning brand positioning statement with four essential elements: target market, competitive set, main benefit, and reason to believe (RTB). You will learn how to build a brand idea that leads every touchpoint of your brand, including the brand promise, brand story, innovation, purchase moment, and the consumer experience. I will give you the tools for how to write a winning brand concept and brand story. In our section on defining your brand, you will learn how to: ✓ Write brand positioning statements ✓ Define your target market, with insights, enemies, and need states ✓ Define consumer benefits, both functional and emotional ✓ Come up with brand support points and claims ✓ Understand the relationship between brand soul, brand idea and brand reputation ✓ Come up with your brand idea ✓ Write brand concept statements ✓ Turn your brand concept into a brand story ✓ Use the brand positioning and brand idea to build your internal brand credo
  13. 13. 3. How to write Brand Plans Too many marketers focus on a short-term to-do list, not a long-term plan. The best brand leaders write brand plans that everyone in the organization can follow with ease, including senior management, sales, R&D, agencies, and operational teams. I will teach you how to write each element of the brand plan, including the brand vision, purpose, values, goals, key Issues, strategies, and tactics. Real-life examples will give you a framework to use on your brand. You will learn to build execution plans including a brand communications plan, innovation plan, and in-store plan. In our section on how to write brand plans, you will learn how to: ✓ Use five strategic questions as an outline for your entire plan ✓ Write an inspirational brand vision statement to frame your brand plan ✓ Come up with a brand purpose and brand values ✓ Summarize your brand’s situation analysis ✓ Map out the key issues your brand faces ✓ Write smart, brand strategy objective statements to build around your brand’s core strength ✓ Write smart, consumer brand objective strategy statements ✓ Write smart, competitive brand objective strategy statements ✓ Write smart, situational brand strategy objective statements ✓ Focus tactics to ensure a high return on effort ✓ Write specific execution plans for brand communications, innovation, and in-store ✓ Come up with a profit statement, sales forecast, goals, and marketing budget for your plan ✓ Use an ideal one-page brand formats for the annual brand plan and long-range strategic roadmap 4. How to inspire marketing execution Too many marketers are becoming task-masters and step over the line into execution. The best brand leaders need to inspire experts to produce smart and creative execution. I will provide tools and techniques for judging and making decisions on creative advertising from your agency. For judging execution, I use the ABC’s tool, believing the best executions must drive Attention (A), Brand link (B), Communication (C) and Stickiness (S). I will provide a checklist for you to use when judging executions, then show you how to provide direction to your agency to inspire and challenge great execution. !13
  14. 14. In our section on how to lead the marketing execution, you will learn how to: ✓ Understand the crucial role of the brand leader in getting great creative execution ✓ Be the brand leaders who can successfully manage the 10 stages of the advertising process ✓ Write a brand communications plan ✓ Turn the brand communications plan into a creative brief ✓ Leverage smart and bad examples of the creative brief ✓ Use the ABC’s advertising decision-making tool ✓ Give inspiring feedback on advertising that pushes for great work ✓ Build your media planning with six media questions ✓ Line up media choices to where consumers are most willing to engage with your brand 5. How to analyze your brand’s performance Too few marketers take the time to dig into data analytics. There is no value in having access to data if you are not using it to discover meaningful insights. The best brand leaders can tell strategic stories through analytics. I will show you how to create a deep-dive business review, looking at the marketplace, consumers, competitors, channels, and brand. I will teach how to turn your analysis into a presentation for management, showing the ideal presentation slide format. I will also provide a Finance 101 for Marketers, giving you every financial formula you need to run your brand. In our section on how to analyze the brand’s performance, you will learn how to: ✓ Analyze the marketplace your brand plays in ✓ Assess your consumers ✓ Assess the retail channels you sell through ✓ Analyze the competitors ✓ Analyze the health of your brand ✓ Use 60 of the best analytical questions to ask ✓ Bring the analysis together into the drivers, inhibitors, threats, and opportunities ✓ Know the financial formulas for compound CAGR, price increases, COGs. and ROI ✓ Prepare a deep-dive business review presentation
  15. 15. Who should read the Beloved Brands playbook? Marketing pros and entrepreneurs, this book is for you. Whether you are a VP, CMO, director, brand manager, or just starting your marketing career, I promise you will learn how to realize your full potential. You could be in brand management working for an organization or an owner- operator managing a branded business. Beloved Brands is a toolbox intended to help you every day in your job. Keep it on your desk and refer to it whenever you need to write a brand plan, create a brand idea, develop a creative brief, make advertising decisions or lead a deep-dive business review. You can even pass on the tools to your team so they can learn how to deliver the fundamentals needed for your brands. This book is also an excellent resource for marketing professors, who can use it as an in-class textbook to develop future marketers. It will challenge communications agency professionals, who are looking to get better at managing brands, including those who work in advertising, public relations, in-store marketing, digital advertising, or event marketing. If you are an entrepreneur who has a great product and wants to turn it into a brand, you can use this book as a playbook. These tips will help you take full advantage of branding and marketing, and make your brand more powerful and more profitable. !15 How good is your brand playbook? Where are the gaps on your team? Target Name Description Needs Enemy Insights They think now? Buying process Desired response The playbook for how to create a brand your consumers will love Bring all the work together to create a winning brand positioning statement To (Target) • Healthy proactive preventers who want to do more for their health, working moms, 35-40 years old. Gray’s is (Category) • The healthy cookie option That is the (Benefit) • Guilt-free cookie to help you stay in control of your health That’s because (Support Points) • In blind taste tests, Gray’s matched the leaders on taste, but has only 100 calories and 3g of net carbs. • In a 12-week study, consumers using Gray’s once a night as a dessert were able to lose 5-10 lbs. 1 2 3 4 GRAY’S Cookies More Cookie. Less guilt. Annual Marketing Plan Analysis Issues and Strategies Execution Plans P&L forecast • Sales $30,385 • Gross Margin $17,148 • GM % 56% • Marketing Budget $8,850 • Contribution Margin $6,949 • CM% 23% Drivers • Taste drives a high conversion of Trial to Purchase • Strong Listings in Food Channels • Exceptional brand health scores among Early Adopters. Highly Beloved Brand among niche. Inhibitors • Low familiar yet to turn our sales into loyalty • Awareness held back due to weak Advertising • Low distribution at specialty stores. Poor coverage. • Low Purchase Frequency among most loyal. Risks • Launch of Mainstream cookie brands (Pepperidge Farms and Nabisco). • De-listing 2 weakest skus weakened our in- store presence • Legal challenge to taste claims Opportunities • R&D has 5 new flavors in development. • Sales Broker gains at Specialty Stores • Use social media to convert loyal following. Key Issues 1.What’s the priority choice for growth: find new users or drive usage frequency among loyalists? 2.Where should the investment/resources focus and deployment be to drive our awareness and share needs for Gray’s? 3.How will we defend Gray’s against the proposed Q1 2014 ‘healthy cookie’ launches from Pepperidge Farms and Nabisco? Strategies 1.Continue to attract new users to Gray’s 2.Focus investment on driving awareness and trial with new consumers and building a presence at retail. 3.Build defence plan against new entrants to defends with consumers and at store level. Goals • Increase penetration from 10% to 12%, specifically up from 15% to 20% with the core target. Monitor usage frequency among the most loyal to ensure it stays steady. • Increase awareness from 33% to 42%, specifically up from 45% to 50% within the core target. Drive trial from 15% to 20%. Close distribution from 62% to 72%. • Hold dollar share during competitive launches. Grow 11% post launch gaining up to 1.2% share. Target zero losses at shelf. Advertising • Use awareness to drive trial of the new Grays. Target “Proactive Preventers”. Suburban working women, 35-40.Main Message of “great tasting cookie without the guilt, so you can stay in control of your health”. Media includes 15 second TV, specialty health magazines, event signage, digital and social media Sampling • Drive trial with In-store sampling at grocery, Costco, health food stores and event sampling at fitness, yoga, women’s networking, new moms. Distribution • Support Q4 retail blitz with message focused on holding shelf space during the competitive launches. Q2 specialty blitz to grow distribution at key specialty stores. Innovation • Launch two new flavours in Q4/15 & Q4/16. Explore diet claims, motivating and own- able. Competitive Defence Plan • Pre Launch sales blitz to shore up all distribution gaps. At launch, heavy merchandising, locking up key ad dates, BOGO. TV, print, coupons, in-store sampling. • Use sales story that any new “healthy” cookies should displace under-performing and declining unhealthy cookies. Brand Vision: Be first ‘healthy cookie’ to generate craving, popularity and sales of a mainstream cookie. $100 Million by 2024. Deep-dive review summary GRAY’SCookies Marketplace Review: 1. Declining cookie sales have created a war among major competitors with lower prices and margins. 2. Category growth and Gray’s growth coming from the West, but facing poor performance in the East. 3. Continuous variations of diet with low calorie, low carb, low fat and gluten free. Consumers remain confused. As eating habits are changing the cookie category is shrinking, while the good-for-you segment thrives. Consumer Review 1. Gray’s taste drives a high conversion of trial to purchase (65% versus a norm of 50%). 2. Low purchase frequency (2.2 boxes per year vs. norm of 7.3) even among the most loyal early adopters. 3. Consumers love Gray’s new “guilt free” concept New consumers attracted to Gray’s “guilt free” positioning, but the great taste drives loyalty Channel Review 1. Successful listings has driven strong distribution in Food Channels (90%) 2. Low distribution at specialty stores at only 16% due to poor sales coverage. 3. Weak coop/display for Gray’s is directly linked to our lower trade terms being offered. Gray’s needs to close distribution gaps, but must maintain advertising investment to drive trial. Competitor Review 1. Re-evaluate strategy and use our power to begin to dominate the “good for you” segment. 2. Dad’s wins on innovation and deep price discounts, but is weak on taste. 3. Major risk if the major cookie brands launch healthy versions that are near-match taste versus current brands. Gray’s has an opportunity to dominate the “good for you” segment before traditional brands enter segment. Brand Review 1. Exceptional scores among early Adopters (“Proactive Preventers”), early base of brand lovers. 2. Brand funnel scores show we are still a niche player but yet to turn our sales into strong following 3. Awareness held back due to poor advertising scores with low attention scores and brand link scores. Gray’s growth due to taste quality, but new “guilt free” positioning will connect deeper and fuel new demand. Overall Brand Challenge: It is time to transition Gray’s from a product-led brand into an idea-led brand to connect with consumers by owning the idea of “guilt free” snacking, rather than just selling a great tasting cookie. Gray’s needs to begin to dominate and lead the “good for you” cookie segment. Brand Promise Consumer BrandBrand Idea Consumer Experience Brand Story Innovation Ideas Purchase Moment Packaging Logo/Slogan Culture and Operations Advertising and Media Product Development Sales and Retail Beloved Like It Love It Unknown We use our Brand Love Curve to chart how consumers feel about the brand Get noticed Establish positioning Influence friends Tighten bond Trusted following Indifferent Brand PlanDeep Dive Review Brand PositioningConsumer Profile Consumer StrategyBrand Idea Map
  16. 16. What will you get from the Beloved Brands playbook? In the past two decades, what makes brands successful has changed, and you must change with it. You will learn the fundamentals of managing your brand, with brand love at the core. I will show you how to improve your thinking to unleash your full potential as a brand leader. You will learn how to think, define, plan, execute, and analyze, and I provide every tool you will ever need to run your brand. You will find models and examples for each of the four strategic thinking methods, looking at core strength, competitive, consumer, and situational strategies. To define the brand, I will provide a tool for writing a brand positioning statement as well as a consumer profile and a consumer benefits ladder. I have created lists of potential functional and emotional benefits to kickstart your thinking on brand positioning. We explore the step-by-step process to come up with your brand idea and bring it all together with a tool for writing the ideal brand concept. For brand plans, I provide formats for a long-range brand strategy roadmap and the annual brand plan with definitions for each planning element. From there, I show how to build a brand execution plan that includes the creative brief, innovation process, and sales plan. I provide tools for how to create a brand calendar, and specific project plans. To grow your brand, I show how to make smart decisions on execution around creative advertising and media choices. When it comes time for the analytics, I provide all the tools you need to write a deep-dive business review, looking at the marketplace, consumer, channels, competitors and the brand. Write everything so that it is easy to follow and implement for your brand. You will learn everything you need to know so you can run your brand. My brand promise is to help make you smarter so you can realize your full potential. Graham Robertson Founder and CMO of Beloved Brands Inc.
  17. 17. BELOVED BRANDS Chapter Summaries Introduction: How the Beloved Brands playbook can work for you Page 5 • The purpose of the Beloved Brands playbook is to make you a smarter brand leader so your brand can win in the market. You will learn how to think strategically, define your brand with a positioning statement and a brand idea, write a brand plan everyone can follow, inspire smart and creative marketing execution, and be able to analyze the performance of your brand through a deep-dive business review. 1. Why being a beloved brand matters Page 12 • The more loved your brand, the more powerful and profitable your brand will be. While old-school marketers were yelling their message to every consumer, today’s brand leaders must build relationships and create a bond with their most cherished consumers. We will explore the concept of a brand idea, showing how it helps connect with consumers and organize everything you do on your brand. An overview of the brand love curve will steer your strategic thinking and execution decisions. 2. How to use strategic thinking to help your brand win Page 21 • Strategic thinking is the foundation of brand management. I will take you through the five elements of smart strategic thinking, including setting a vision, investing in a strategic program that focuses on an identified opportunity, and how to leverage a breakthrough market impact into a performance result. I will show how to turn smart thinking into strategic objective statements you can use in your Brand Plans. Moreover, I will set up the four types of strategy, looking at your brand’s core strength, consumers, competitors, and looking at the situation. 3. How to build your brand around your core strength Page 32 • Our core strength model forces you to select one of four possible options as your brand’s lead strength: the product, brand story, experience, or price. Each choice has a distinct strategic focus, brand communications, and desired reputation. I will show how the model comes to life with numerous brand examples and a case study on Starbucks as they build a reputation around their commitment to an exceptional consumer experience. 4. How to build a tight bond with your most cherished consumers Page 42 • Consumer strategy is about building a bond with your target consumer. I use the brand love curve to demonstrate specific game plans for each stage of the curve, whether your brand is at the unknown, indifferent, like it, love it or the beloved stage. This model sets up distinct strategies and 20 potential actions. A case study on Special K shows how they evolved from an indifferent brand to a beloved brand. !17
  18. 18. 5. How to win the competitive battle for your consumer’s heart Page 54 • The competitive strategy leverages the brand’s positioning to win in the market. Brands must evolve their strategy as they move from a craft brand to a disruptor brand to a challenger brand up to the dominant power player. Each of the four choices offers a different target focus, unique strategies, and tactics. 6. How to address your brand situation before you make your next move Page 68 • Before initiating your plan, you must understand what is happening internally, within your own company. You can learn four distinct situations, including fueling the momentum, fix it, re-alignment, or a start-up. Each situation has different indicators and recommended strategies, as well as advice on the leadership style to engage. 7. How to define the ideal target market to build your brand around Page 76 • Everything must start with the consumer target you will serve. I will show how to develop a consumer profile that includes a segmented definition, consumer insights, consumer enemies, need states, and the desired response that matches your overall strategy. 8. How to define your brand positioning to help your brand win Page 91 • You will learn the four elements of a brand positioning statement including the target you serve, the category you play in, the space you serve that will help you win, and deal-closing support points—the best positioning balances functional and emotional benefits. You will access a tool to choose from more than 100 benefits. 9. How to create a brand idea you can build everything around Page 102 • To become a successful and beloved brand, you need a Brand Idea that is interesting, simple, unique, inspiring, motivating, and own-able. I will introduce a tool to help build your Brand Idea, and how to build a winning brand concept. 10. How to use your brand idea to organize everything you do Page 113 • Use the brand idea to organize everything you do around five consumer touch-points, including the brand promise, brand story, innovation, purchase moment and the consumer experience. The brand idea should organize your brand positioning, advertising, media, product innovation, selling, retailing, and the consumer experience. Learn how to build a brand credo, and brand story. We use Ritz-Carlton and Apple case studies to support the learning. 11. How to build a brand plan everyone can follow Page 124 • Use a one-page format to simplify and organize your brand plan so everyone in your organization can follow it with ease. You will learn how to find your brand vision, purpose, key issues, strategies, execution tactics, and measurements.
  19. 19. 12. How to build your brand’s execution plans Page 142 • Once you draft your brand plan, it is time to build separate execution plans with crystal clear strategies for those who will execute on your brand's behalf. I will show how to complete a brand communication plan, execution plan, and sales plan. 13. How to write a creative brief to set up brilliant execution Page 151 • The bridge between your brand plan and marketing execution is the creative brief. I will show how to write a world-class brief using a recommended format. We will review smart and bad examples of a brief, broken out on a line-by-line basis. I also introduce a mini-brief for when you are time-pressed. 14. How to run your brand’s advertising process Page 164 • I will take you through the ten steps to inspiring greatness from those experts you engage. I will introduce a predictive model that measures branded breakthrough and a motivating message to consumers. 15. How to make advertising decisions using our ABC’s model Page 172 • This section outlines principles for achieving Attention, Brand link, Communication, and Stickiness—the model I call the ABC’s. I will show examples of some of the best ads in the history of branding, to support those principles. I hope it will challenge your thinking about your brand’s advertising. 16. How to make media decisions to break through the cluttered media world Page 187 • Six questions help you frame your media plan. Consider factors such as your brand's budget size, your brand's core strength and how tightly connected your brand is with consumers. Then identify which point on the consumer journey you wish to impact, where your consumers are most willing to engage your message and what media choices best fit with your creative execution. 17. How to conduct a deep-dive business review to uncover brand issues Page 199 • The deep-dive review forces a 360-degree view of your brand by looking into the marketplace, consumers, channels, competitors, and the brands. You will learn some of the best analytical tools, including consumer tracking, customer scorecards, brand funnels, and the leaky bucket. I provide the 50 best analytical questions to get you started, and a format for how to bring it all together into a business review presentation. 18. Marketing Finance 101 to help manage your brand’s profitability Page 214 • Learn what you need to know about brand finance, including the eight ways you can drive profit. Learn how to dissect an income statement and use the essential financial formulas that marketers need to know including return on investment (ROI), growth, forecasting, cost of goods sold (COGS), and compound annual growth rate (CAGR). !19

×