Bee Stings and Food/Drug Interactions
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Presentation on Bee Stings and Food/Drug Interactions for Second Semester CPR and First Aid Class at Concord High School

Presentation on Bee Stings and Food/Drug Interactions for Second Semester CPR and First Aid Class at Concord High School

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    Bee Stings and Food/Drug Interactions Bee Stings and Food/Drug Interactions Presentation Transcript

    • Bee Stings and Food and Drug Interactions Rose Harmon CPR and First Aid
    • Bee Stings
      • Bee stings can be very dangerous
      • Reactions to bee stings are split into two categories:
        • Local
        • Systematic
    • Bee Stings
      • Local Reaction:
        • Symptoms include pain, redness, itchiness and swelling
        • A bacterial skin condition can also develop within 12-36 hours
    • Bee Stings
      • Systematic Reaction:
        • Allergic reaction
        • Symptoms include difficulty breathing or speaking, swelling in the mouth and throat, a rash all over the body, faintness or decreased level of consciousness, nausea or vomiting
        • Take emergency care immediately!
    • What to Do When Stung
      • Local Reaction:
        • Act quickly!
        • Get to a safe area as soon as possible
        • Remove the stinger
    • What to Do When Stung
      • Systematic Reaction:
        • Act quickly!
        • Get to a safe area and remove the stinger
        • Check for an EpiPen, and use it if it’s available. If it is NOT available, call 911 immediately. Do NOT wait for symptoms to appear.
    • What to Do When Stung
      • Systematic Reaction cont.:
        • Antihistamines such as Benadryl can slow symptoms
        • Generally bee stings aren’t dangerous, but they can be fatal so it is important to seek emergency medical care as soon as possible
    • Treat a Sting From Home
      • Antihistamines and calamine lotion will help with the itchiness
      • Pain will go away quickly, but swelling may last over a day
      • Using an ice pack will reduce swelling
    • Other Notes
      • If the victim is stung more than 10 times or is stung in the mouth, nose or throat, call 911 immediately
    • Food/Drug Interactions
      • A food/drug interaction occurs when the medicine you are taking is affected by the food you are eating.
      • It can happen with both prescription medications and over the counter medications
    • Food/Drug Interactions
      • The food may slow the body’s absorption of the medicine or delay it’s effect
        • This is why some medications are to be taken on an empty stomache
        • Not all medicines are affected by food
    • Effects of Food/Drug Interaction
      • Effects may vary, but they can be very dangerous
        • Ex. Eating licorice while taking Lanoxin can cause Lanoxin toxicity
    • How to Avoid a Food/Drug Interaction
      • Read the labels on prescription bottles
      • Be sure to understand warnings and side effects.
        • If anything is unclear, call your doctor
      • Ask your doctor if there are any foods you should not eat with your medications
    • How to Avoid a Food/Drug Interaction
      • Follow the instructions your doctor gives you
      • Make sure all your doctors know what medications you are on
      • NEVER under any circumstances drink alcohol with your medication.
    • Comparisons
      • When doing my research, I didn’t find many similarities between bee stings and food/drug interactions. The side effects are different, the only similarity between the two being possible death. Also, serious side effects of food/drug interactions are not caused by the patient’s allergies like bee stings.
    • Works Cited Brouhard, Rod. &quot;Bee Sting Treatment - How to Treat Bee Stings.&quot; About.com First Aid - First Aid & Safety Tips for Emergencies or Everyday. 30 Sept. 2009. Web. 23 May 2010. <http://firstaid.about.com/od/heatcoldexposure/ht/07_bee_sting.htm>. Conrad Stoppler, MD, Melissa. &quot;Bee and Wasp Stings - When to Seek Medical Care on EMedicineHealth.&quot; EMedicineHealth - Experts in Everyday Emergencies, First Aid and Health Information. Web. 23 May 2010. <http://www.emedicinehealth.com/bee_and_wasp_stings/page3_em.htm#When to Seek Medical Care>. Kelly, MD, MS, Robert B. &quot;Drug-Food Interactions -- Familydoctor.org.&quot; Familydoctor.org Home -- Familydoctor.org. Dec. 2009. Web. 23 May 2010. <http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/seniors/seniors-meds/121.html>. Ravel, MD, Daniel. &quot;Bee And Insect Stings In Children. Information on Yellow Jackets, Hornets, Ants, Fire Ants, Wasps, Venom, Anaphylaxis, Anaphylactic Shock, and Epinephrine.&quot; The Medical Journal of Australia. 17 Aug. 2002. Web. 23 May 2010. <http://dentalresource.org/topic43stings.htm>. United States of America. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Department of Health and Human Services. U S Food and Drug Administration Home Page. Web. 23 May 2010. <http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm096386>.