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  • Arkansas, as well as every other state is focusing on Closing the Achievement Gap . This Module information focuses around “Filling” in the Achievement Gap with Parent/Community Involvement. The emphasis is that Parent Involvement is not an “add on.” It should be embedded or infused into the daily curriculum and school communication. Families, communities, students, and schools are and can be a part of each and every day of instruction. The information is provided to assist educators in their efforts in closing the gap by Filling In the Achievement Gaps.   Approaches to eliminating the gaps are: Strong Leadership, Intentional Instructional Practices Focus on Teacher-Student Relationships Data Driven Decision Commitment to School-Community and Parent Involvement .  
  • Administrators, Staff, Parents, and Students all contribute to the school’s climate. Positive relationships between all stakeholders, administrators, staff, parents, and students help create a climate that is conducive to enhancing the parental involvement program in your school/district which research shows is tied to student achievement. Everyone supports and determines the “climate” of the school and the environment. The Administrator is at the TOP! And is the leader and role model for students, staff and parents. Resource : Arkansas’ PIRC (Parent Information Resource Center) is a federally funded network of services for family/community involvement focusing on NCLB. The state’s PIRC is located in Little Rock and a site in Springdale. For more information and valuable resources, go to http://www.parenting-ed.org/
  • Administrators have to balance management tasks with leadership tasks, with the majority of their focus on leadership, rather then on management. Management is a set of processes that keeps a system running smoothly. Management includes budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling and problem solving. Leadership is a set of processes that: Adapts organizations to changing circumstances Leadership defines the future Communicates what the vision should look like Aligns people with that vision Inspires them or motivates them to reach the vision despite obstacles. Leading Change , page 25 In an effective school the principal acts as an instructional leader and effectively and persistently communicates the mission or vision to the staff, students, and parents. The principal understands and applies instructional effectiveness in the management of the instructional program. The principal cannot be the only leader in the school but becomes “the leader of the leaders.” The leadership constitutes creating a community of shared vision/mission. The vision/mission is critical because it is an identification of where the school is headed and what the school community cares most about. (Lawrence Lezotte, Correlates of Effective Schools: The First and Second Generation)
  • Administrators should begin the vision/mission process. Developing a good vision/mission is an exercise of both the head and the heart. It takes some time, it always involves a group of people, and it is tough to do well. ( Leading Change p. 79) Administrators, support staff, community partners, teachers, parents, and even students, should be involved in the vision/mission creation process. Each person involved should bring their own “piece” to the puzzle and each “piece” contributes to the whole which is the vision/mission. The real power of a vision is unleashed only when most of those involved have an understanding of the school’s goals and direction. This shared sense of vision can help motivate and coordinate actions to reach the vision/mission. Once the vision has been designed then is must be communicated. ACTIVITY: In small groups, take 5 minutes and share the “vision” or the “visual” you see for your school. Allow small groups to report out.
  • At the heart of any organization or school is a clearly articulated and well defined vision or mission. Administrators, Staff, Students, and Parents are all a vital part of the school’s vision and mission. All stakeholders, administrators, staff, students, and parents need to be aware of the vision/mission and collectively work toward it. The vision/mission should be the foundation on which everything else is built upon and what sets the tone (climate/culture) of the school. “ Vision refers to a picture of the future” of where we want and need to be. A good vision serves three purposes: it tells where we want or need to be in the future instead of where we are today, it motivates people to work in the right direction, and it helps to coordinate the actions and work of all the stakeholders. (Leading Change, p.68) According to Lawrence Lezotte’s Correlates of Effective Schools, effective schools have a clearly articulated school mission. The challenge is….. How do we get “there.” It takes a “leader” (classroom teacher, specialty teacher or the administrator) to step out and take the first steps and continue walking forward and not stop when challenges arise.
  • The vision is most effectively communicated when many different vehicles are used: large group meetings, memos, newspapers, posters, informal one-on-one talks, etc. When the same message comes at people from many different directions and avenues then it has a greater chance of being heard and remembered. There are 7 things to keep in mind when communicating the vision: (All from Leading Change ) Keep it Simple- eliminate educational jargon to enable anyone to understand your vision Use metaphors, analogies, and examples- The old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words comes into play here. A verbal picture can communicate very effectively. Use multiple forums and avenues for communicating your vision. Large group meetings, small meetings, memo’s, newspapers, posters, one-on-one conversations…anything to get the word out and to keep it out. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Repeated exposure to ideas will help them sink in. “A sentence here, a paragraph there, two minutes in the middle of a meeting, five minutes at the end of a conversation, three quick references in a speech- collectively these brief mentions can add up to a massive amount of useful communication, which is generally what is needed to win over both hearts and minds.” (Leading Change p. 95) Lead By Example- Administrators or leaders communicate volumes when their behavior is consistent with the vision. This is one of the most powerful forms of communication. Telling people one thing and then behaving differently will undermine the vision. “Nothing undermines the communication of a change vision more than behavior on the part of key players that seems inconsistent with the vision.” (Leading Change p. 97) Explain Inconsistencies- Unexplained inconsistencies undermine the credibility of all communication and need to be explained, simply and honestly. Give and Take- Two way communication is more powerful and meaningful then one-way communication . Two way discussions are an effective method for helping to answer questions. Buying into an idea, strategy, vision, etc. comes after much exploring and wrestling with the change which means asking questions, challenging, arguing, etc. Communicate the vision to all people involved to create a shared sense of purpose. When there is a shared sense of purpose it will be easier to reach the vision.
  • Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles in their book Gung Ho! give strategies that will help align people with the vision/mission.
  • Question : as you watch a squirrel, what do you observe? What do squirrels do and why? One way of aligning and uniting people with your vision/mission is to ensure that everyone feels like their work is worthwhile in achieving the vision/mission. Each and every person in your school plays an important role in reaching the school’s vision or mission. They may not think that they do, but they do. Each person on the staff, from the custodian to the administrator, contribute to the school culture and climate. Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles in their book Gung Ho! call this “ The Spirit of the Squirrel: Worthwhile Work”. Worthwhile work is not to be confused with important work. Staff need to feel that their work is important but worthwhile work goes beyond important. There are three pieces to worthwhile work. “First, the work has to be understood as important. Second, it has to lead to a well-understood and shared goal (vision/mission). Third, values have to guide all plans, decisions, and actions. Put all three together and you’ve got worthwhile work. In short, Spirit of the Squirrel.” ( Gung Ho! P. 29) The climate of a school can be negative or positive based on the encounters and interactions of the entire staff. The climate of the school can unite the staff to work together toward the mission or divide the staff, making working toward the mission difficult, if not impossible. Each staff member needs to understand how what they are doing contributes to reaching the school vision/mission and needs to see that they are a viable, worthwhile part of the school organization. “One of the fastest and surest ways to feel good about yourself is to understand how your work fits into the big picture” ( Gung Ho! P. 35), the vision/mission.
  • Is motivation a reason why educators work hard?
  • Do they have an ultimate goal? What if that goal is not reached? How does the squirrel compare to education?
  • What motivates You? What motivates your students? Have you asked them??
  • Educators are well worthwhile! Educators make the world a better place. We have plans and decisions to make just like the squirrels. Do you demonstrate or have the characteristics of the Spirit of the Squirrel?
  • First things are First!
  • What are the consequences if there is no “buy in” from staff, students, community, organizations or administrators?
  • Discuss how your group can be more productive and work as a group instead of individually.
  • In Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles book, “ Gung Ho! ” the next step after The Spirit of the Squirrel is “The Way of The Beaver: In Control of Achieving The Goal.” Once people realize that the work that they are doing is worthwhile and they understand where they are going (the vision/mission) and how what they are doing helps to accomplish the goal of the school, then you have to get out of the way and let them work, in essence, The Way of The Beaver. The administrator’s or leaders job is to let people know why the work that they do is worthwhile, be involved in deciding where we are going (vision/mission), make sure that the teachers and staff share that goal, provide resources needed to reach the goal, garner support from inside and outside the school to help reach the goal. The leaders define the playing field and the rules of the game (curriculum, ADE rules and regulations, etc.) and then they have to get off the field and let the players move the ball. In other words, Once you have done all of that then you need to step back and let the teachers teach. “ People who are truly in control work for organizations that value them as persons. Their thoughts, feelings, needs, and dreams are respected, listened to, and acted upon.” ( Gung Ho! P. 85)
  • EACH beaver has his own particular part of the task of building the dam. We should take a lesson from the beaver. We are smarter working together and allowing each individual to do their own part of the task based on expertise.
  • ACTIVITY: Ask participants to share an “expertise” he/she sees in another colleague. For example: Ms. A shares that Ms. B is very organized. Mr. C shares that Mr. D is cheerful and always positive. We all have a role in completing tasks.
  • Look for the “beavers” in education that will strengthen the family/community involvement in the local community. Be in control!
  • Discuss the 3 sides of the beaver
  • People work hard to achieve a goal when they are motivated. When people feel that the work they do is worthwhile and appreciated they are more motivated to work. Each person needs to perceive that what they are doing is an important and worthwhile piece of the vision. The same is true if people believe that they have some control over what they are doing to meet the shared vision/mission/goal of the school. Leaders need to value individuals as persons and treat them as such. Individual thoughts, feelings, and needs should be respected, listened to, and acted upon. Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles have one more area in their book “Gung Ho!” entitled “The Gift of the Goose: Cheering Others On.” The Gift of the Goose is simple… encouraging and cheering others on as they work towards the goal is very motivating. Enthusiastic employees need congratulations or affirmations that who they are and what they are doing matter and that they are a valuable piece of the puzzle in achieving the goal/mission/vision. This isn’t easy for some people and it takes a little bit of time, which many of us do not have an abundance of, however, the payoff in the long run is worth finding the time. Not everyone will always be deserving of congratulations and when you can’t actually congratulate someone you can encourage them. Words of encouragement mean that you believe in them and are aware of the efforts that they are making which in essence means that you have paid them a compliment. Congratulations need to be true and genuine, and they need to be perceived as such. ACTVITY: Think for a minute about why people leave their current jobs, positions, schools, or even careers for something different.
  • The goose is the cheerleader and motivator and is enthusiastic. Question: Do you like to work with individuals that are enthusiastic? What happens to your work style or thought process? Can you think of an enthusiastic individual within your organization? What does that person bring to the “table” of implementing parent involvement? What does that person bring to the “table” of implementing the expectations of students?
  • Wouldn’t it be fantastic to ONLY here the “honks” from individuals about things going great?? When do you usually hear “honks”?
  • Why will the goose make more of a difference? ACTVITY: Discuss the how the flight of the “goose” is unique and such a great leadership visual.
  • Do you have all three on your team? Do you have the squirrel, beaver, and goose? Do you need more?
  • Is this your attitude? If not… what can make a difference?
  • Everyone is SOMEBODY!
  • Having the squirrel, beaver, and goose in your work environment….. Will be a GUNG HO! environment! Find your “critters!” Everyone demonstrates their own expertise. Some of us are not leaders and some of us are followers. Some of us are organized and some of us are not concerned with organization but creativity. Every school will have: The Spirit of the Squirrel! The Way of the Beaver! The Gift of the Goose!
  • “ According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the number-one reason people leave their jobs is because ‘they do not feel appreciated’.” ( Bucket ) One poll found that 65% of Americans reported that they received no recognition or praise for good work in the past year. We all need and want recognition and praise for our efforts but we rarely receive it, and according to research, our organizations suffer because of it.” ACTVITY : Share in small groups how “appreciation/positives” can be demonstrated. Write on a flip chart some creative ways/examples of appreciation.
  • We all experience positive and negative interactions on a daily basis that influence how we feel and how we act, and that lead to our overall satisfaction, not just our job satisfaction. Many of these interactions are commonplace and we take them for granted and assume that they do not matter, when in fact they do matter. Most of our negative experiences will not harm us but they slowly chip away at our well-being and our productivity. On the other hand, positive experiences and encounters can be even more powerful. In the book, “ How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life ”, Tom Rath and Donald Clifton explore in depth their research and insight into the power of negative and positive interactions and the impact that these encounters have on people as individuals, and the impact that they have on their productivity in the ,work place. Just how important are positive encounters? “ Studies show that organizational leaders who share positive emotions have workgroups with a more positive mood, enhanced job satisfaction, greater engagement, and improved group performance.” ( Bucket p. 28) It only takes one person to begin infusing positive emotions into an organization to create a change in climate. Greater engagement and improved performance alone are motivators for working toward a more positive climate. Teachers who are more engaged and have improved performance will have students who are more engaged and who have improved performance which will help the entire school work toward the shared vision/mission/goal of the school.
  • Negative staff members are not as productive and can scare off customers, which in our setting, is our parents and our students. Think about an experience that you have had when you’ve had to contact a customer service representative when you’ve had a problem. One study investigated the impact that a single employee can have on customers. In this study it was discovered that three service representatives scared off every single customer that they spoke with and those customers did not return. The company would have been better off if those employees had stayed home then if they had come to work. People share their positive and their negative encounters with other people as well. Think about your school. It only takes one unhappy parent in a classroom to rally the other parents in that classroom and create a problem. “Negative employees can tear through a workplace like a hurricane racing through a coastal town.” ( Bucket p. 39) The same is true for schools. It only takes one unhappy teacher going up and down the halls or talking in the teachers lounge to create a negative, unhealthy climate. Small Groups : Sometimes, educators do not realize we are negative to students until it is too late. How are we sometimes negative with our comments? Small groups report out.
  • The Theory of the Bucket and the Dipper is very simple. We each have an invisible bucket that is filled and emptied based on the types of encounters that we have on a daily basis. Our interactions with other people can either “fill” our bucket or “empty” our bucket based on whether or not they are positive or negative encounters. When we receive genuine praise, have positive encounters, and respond positively to people around us our bucket, and their bucket, is filled. When we are constantly surrounded by negative encounters then we are “dipping” from our bucket, and other’s buckets which can leave us feeling “empty” and dissatisfied. We’ve heard the saying for years about the “power of positive thinking” but does being positive really have an impact? According to one study, “Ninety-nine out of every 100 people report that they want to be around more positive people; 9 out of 10 report being more productive when they’re around positive people.” Every single one of us has literally hundreds of interactions with people every day and we all have the opportunity to spread “positive” emotions or “negative” emotions through these interactions. Unfortunately, most of us have been raised in a culture where it’s easier to tell people what they have done wrong then it is to praise them for things that they have done well or successes they have achieved. Take just a moment and think about your past. What situations do you remember the most? We normally remember those situations that were either very positive or very negative and rarely remember those that are neutral. In some instances, a single encounter, either positive or negative, can change your life forever. ACTVITY: Put this in the school setting…which teachers do you remember the most from when you were in school…why do you remember them? According to Positive Psychology experts, the number of positive acts is critical. “The magic ratio is 5 positive interactions for every 1 negative interaction.” ( Bucket p. 56) Productivity increases when the the ratio is 3:1. This does not mean that negativity should be ignored completely. There are times when it needs to be addressed and it should be addressed. In most workplaces, and schools are no exception, praise is rare. Sincere and meaningful praise and recognition for efforts increases the morale in any workplace. Leaders and administrators who initiate positive emotions and encounters, even on a small scale, will begin to see a difference immediately. More importantly, it doesn’t cost anything other then a little time, effort, and initiative and the payoff is well worth the time.
  • Positive interactions with the people that you work with can lead to dramatic increases in productivity and they don’t come with a high price tag. “Studies show that organizational leaders who share positive emotions have workgroups with a more positive mood, enhanced job satisfaction, greater engagement, and improved group performance.” ( Bucket p. 28) It only takes one person to begin the process of infusing positive emotions into the organization and the leader of the organization is a good place to start. Why is it important to have more satisfied people working in your school? People who are more satisfied and are happier at work will work harder toward achieving your mission/vision. As leaders in your school, think of ways that you currently recognize the achievements of your staff, praise their efforts, and encourage a positive climate. Depending on the size of the group, have individuals share at their tables and then share with the entire group or skip the sharing at their tables and just share with the entire group. How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton, Ph.D. is a great resource for infusing positive emotions into your school climate. We’ve just touched on a few highlights from the book in this session and I encourage you to pick up a copy for yourself. It’s a quick read and it comes complete with an instructional guide for educators with classroom as well as school wide applications. One way to “fill people’s buckets” is to learn about them. Handout # 1 gives some ideas on how you can learn about others and also gives some creative ways to give unexpectedly (drops). This handout can be found in the 2008 – 2009 Resources – Module 3 Handout 1 Handout # 2 is a worksheet that you can have your staff, parents, or students fill out to help you learn about them. This handout can be found in the 2008 – 2009 Resources – Module 3 Handout 2 ACTIVITY: Place a bucket in the front of the room. Directions: Ask participants to divide in twos/pairs. Give everyone a piece of blank paper. Have each participant to write a positive about his/her partner. When signaled, have the partners share the positive. Ask each participant to fold paper and put into the bucket…. LOOK at the positives that are FREE!!!
  • The classroom climate is a major factor in the over all school climate. The classroom is a “mini” school. Keep up with the positives you give your students with some form of counting documentation. Keep up with the positives you give your staff with some form of counting documentation. Reinforce the positives the students give one another You will be the model!
  • Teachers and staff have “full buckets” as well as parents. Teachers are often the “key” leaders in parent involvement. Teachers have to be “won over” then, they can effectively win the parents over. The next few slides are based on the book REVVED!
  • As educators, we realize that not all of “us” promote family/community involvement. “We” all know the research and the emphasize that is placed on parental involvement and the success of schools. But, educators tend to be too busy, not friendly, and even bring personal life into the classroom. Educators must be professional at all times. A PERFECT example has been seen over the last few years. ACTIVITY: In small groups, discuss what you see or what happens when a “school” is notified that there may be a possibility of being “closed/taken over/annexed”?
  • If you expect people/parents/co-workers to work hard for and with you, you have to reach out and “truly” care about them. When you do, they will care about you in return. Life works that way. Question: Share an experience where you refuse to “go back” to a business/agency. What happened? How could the situation been avoided? ACTIVITY: How are schools/education and the business community similar?
  • I have worked with teachers who walked into the school in the mornings and I was scared to say good morning. Can you imagine how a parent would feel? School is no different than any other workplace. You have to learn to put your personal life aside and go about the business of teaching “tomorrow’s leaders”. Stop and think…. Can your colleagues and students determine your “mood/emotions” first thing in the morning or at the beginning of the school day? Too many times “we” teach and lead based on our emotions. Have your emotions determined your discipline, student expectations, reactions to adults and students or your productivity.
  • LET’S BE HONEST! These are thoughtful questions to ask yourself. Do you put aside your personal life to devote your best to your deserving students and their parents as well as to your co-workers? You need to behave in a consistent way, regardless of how you feel. School is no different than any other workplace in that respect. The keys to making this work are patience and a little self-discipline. Teachers and Administrators should “Model” the value of Parental Involvement and Community involvement also. Instruction: Character Education Lesson: Discuss how “we” feel when: No one speaks to you Not a friendly place to visit Adults talk mean You feel a part of the “group” Adults or teacher smile at you
  • This way allows you to think clearly for what is best for your students, their parents and your co-workers. Leaders/Educators must always CHECK their emotions. Leaders/Educators must always CHECK their body language. What do you do when you have “had enough!”?
  • IT’S A CHOICE! Anyone can develop this ‘Personality Plus’-but it does take effort on your part. Learn the names of your students’ parents quickly. Take time to do things that show your students that they matter to you. Take time to show parents the positive side BEFORE you show them the negative side of their child’s class time with you. A positive phone call, a postcard, a note in the backpack will do wonders for the student as well as the parent. These kind of teachers are the ones everyone wants their child to have. School Board members even request that teacher for their child. Word gets around quickly. Research supports that achievement is a resulting factor in teacher expectation, motivation and positive interaction with staff, families and students. Encourage care giver/parent to participate in assignments or sharing information with the class. Always make time for the parent or community member whether it is after 3:30 or before 8:00 or if you are in a union!
  • Positive Psychology experts are finding that the frequency of small, positive acts is critical. A recent study found that workgroups with higher positive to negative ratio were more productive. The memorable moments are almost always positive or negative. In some cases, a single encounter can change your life forever. ACTIVITY: In 30 seconds, write down 5 Positive interactions/comments you gave today or yesterday ! ACTIVITY: In 30 seconds, write down 5 Positive interactions/comments you received today or yesterday ! Suggestion: Provide “smiley” stickers to participants. I challenge you to “freely” give out smiles throughout the next day or week. It will become contagious!
  • You, as a teacher, are a supervisor. You are a supervisor of students and that information gets home to the parents. Sometimes you have to “play the part” of caring first before it feels natural. Start with “Today I will be the master of my emotions.” Sometimes “fake it before you feel it”. People show “caring” in different ways. Make SURE your students and/or staff know you CARE! Make sure the community knows YOU care about your students and that the community/families/students must learn to care too.
  • It will help you learn how to rid yourself of negativity and replace it with positive attitude and caring. TEAM – Together Everyone Achieves More! Team or Leadership Team SREB Survey Handout. The Team Surveys can be found in the 2008-2009 Resource section – Module 2 – Team Surveys This “TEAM” attitude should continue with the parental involvement team members, ACSIP, Closing the Achievement Gap or goal setting.
  • Even if you don’t feel like it-Remember “Today I become the master of my emotions”. Actively listen to what they have to say. This means to stop what you are doing and focus solely on what they are saying. The best way to engage people is with your attitude, enthusiasm, and excitement. Don’t be nice to people just because you want something from them. Be positive just to be positive Watch how your life changes for the better Each and every one of us absolutely loves to be appreciated for who we are and what we do The students in your classroom and their parents are no different. Think – Would you rather be driving a “go cart” or a “bumper car”?
  • Singling out co-workers, students and parents who have chosen to go the extra mile for you do it as a “special favor” to you. You need to make them feel special in return so that they don’t feel taken for granted. Not only send them a thank you note, but “name drop” to co-workers, bosses, community members. Brag on these people who really do a great job and go the extra mile. You will receive the bonus called the “multiplier effect”. Word spreads on how appreciative you are. Sincere appreciation gets results. After all, excitement, as well as passion, is contagious. The key is making sure that everyone has a voice in making suggestions on how things can be improved. When “Building an Army” remember that the more you give, the more that comes back. The best leaders are confident enough to give credit to others when things go right but take the blame when things go wrong. Be wary of the jealous co-worker. Don’t let their 10 seconds of negativity ruin your day. Remember, you are in charge of your emotions. When you are making that person feel absolutely great, you are basically blowing that someone away emotionally! This is a feeling everyone wants to feel again and again. Since going the extra mile for you is what led to these great feelings, this person now thinks that doing it again will give them the chance to feel great all over again. ACTVITY: Provide bubbles for participants to blow bubbles. Observe the “child like” behavior and positive interactions.
  • At first, you may need to “make” yourself care, (fake it ‘til you feel it) but you’ll soon realize that you really do care and care deeply for each student, each parent and each co-worker or you wouldn’t be in education to begin with. Also, remember that the roughest road leads to the top. Your strong leadership abilities depend on the truth, compassion but also the ability to “turn the other cheek”. Remember to turn enemies into allies. The workplace is too small to have enemies. Clear the air and don’t let the matter fester and grow worse, especially when it comes to parents and their child. Caring costs nothing. Not only do people feel compelled to care back but they also begin to care about those around them. Remember, it is contagious. Don’t let the moment pass without celebrating with friends, family to “recharge” your own batteries. Become the Energizer Bunny!!!!
  • This handout can be found in the 2008-2009 Resource Section – Module 3 – Handout #3
  • Randy Pausch was a professor that gained popularity after he appeared on the Oprah Show sharing his “ Last Lecture .” This lecture was not to the hundreds of students but to his family that hopefully would be shown again in later years when his children were old enough to understand his message. Professor Pausch lecture focused on making everyday count, follow your dreams, and set and maintain priorities. Professor Pausch died July 2008 after a long battle with Pancreatic Cancer. ACTIVITY: Share The LAST LECTURE by Randy Pausch. http://blip.tv/file/470635
  • Handout # 4- Poem: When You Thought I Wasn’t Looking This handout can be found in the 2008-2009 Resource Section – Module 3 – Handout #4
  • Administrators, Staff, Parents, and Students all contribute to the school’s climate. Positive relationships between all stakeholders, administrators, staff, parents, and students help create a climate that is conducive to enhancing the parental involvement program in your school/district which research shows is tied to student achievement. Everyone supports and determines the “climate” of the school and the environment. The Administrator is at the TOP! And is the leader and role model for students, staff and parents. Resource : Arkansas’ PIRC (Parent Information Resource Center) is a federally funded network of services for family/community involvement focusing on NCLB. The state’s PIRC is located in Little Rock and a site in Springdale. For more information and valuable resources, go to http://www.parenting-ed.org/
  • Excellent website with hundreds of resources and ideas.
  • Administrators, Staff, Parents, and Students all contribute to the school’s climate. Positive relationships between all stakeholders, administrators, staff, parents, and students help create a climate that is conducive to enhancing the parental involvement program in your school/district which research shows is tied to student achievement. Everyone supports and determines the “climate” of the school and the environment. The Administrator is at the TOP! And is the leader and role model for students, staff and parents. It takes everyone to Build Positive Relationships in order to PROMOTE Parent/Community Involvement. We need YOU!
  • We can not educate every child by ourselves. “Schools” must have have the support and INVOLVEMENT of the parent/families, community, student, and school personnel.

Transcript

  • 1. 2008-2009 Parent/Community Involvement Filling In The Achievement Gaps Module 3Building Positive Relationships to Promote Parental Involvement
  • 2. “Filling In” The Achievement Gap 2008-2009Parent/Community Involvement Module Arkansas Department of Education
  • 3. Building Positive Relationshipsto Promote Parental Involvement Administrators Students Climate Staff Parents
  • 4. AdministratorsManagement Verses Leadership C’mon guys…we can do this!
  • 5. “If You Build It, They Will Come”• It’s the leader’s ability to … – Say it – Plan it – Do it in such a way that others know that you know how and, – Know that they want to follow you. John Maxwell
  • 6. Administrators• Defining the Vision
  • 7. Mission/Vision• Vision- Know where you are going• Clearly articulated
  • 8. Communicating The Vision• Keep It Simple• Metaphors, Analogies, & Examples• Multiple Forums• Repeat, Repeat, Repeat• Lead By Example• Explain Inconsistencies• Give and Take
  • 9. Align People With The Vision• “Spirit of the Squirrel: Worthwhile Work”
  • 10. The Spirit of the Squirrel • Why do squirrels work so hard?  They work hard because they are motivated!
  • 11. The Spirit of the Squirrel • Why are the squirrels motivated?  They have a goal. They are working toward the goal of putting away food.
  • 12. The Spirit of the Squirrel • Why does the goal motivate them?  If they don’t store up food they won’t survive the winter!
  • 13. The Spirit of the Squirrel Their job is WORTHWHILE! •Knowing we make the world a better place •Everyone works toward a shared goal •Values guide all plans, decisions, and actions
  • 14. Spirit of the Squirrel Two Requirements to BUILD Trust for the Productivity• Honesty• Putting team members first
  • 15. Spirit of the Squirrel“You can take the horse to the water but You can’t make him drink it.” It’s the BUY-IN and Commitment that makes the difference. The squirrel is committed!
  • 16. Spirit of the Squirrel Productivity!Think of the squirrel!
  • 17. Align People With The Mission“The Way of The Beaver:In Control of Achieving The Goal”
  • 18. The Way of the Beaver • In control of achieving the Goal • Being an individual to achieve the goal • The beavers each build or repair their own part of the dam
  • 19. The Way of the Beaver • Beavers NEVER “redo” what another beaver has done. • Beavers do “their individual thing” and do it well • Beavers are persistent • Beavers are in control
  • 20. The Way of the Beaver • People who are truly in control work for organizations that value them as persons. Their thoughts, feelings, needs and dreams are respected, listened to, and acted upon.
  • 21. The Way of the BeaverThree sides of the beaver’s activity 2. Individual taking charge & being in control of achieving the goal 2. An organization that allowed and encouraged individuals to do so & their thoughts, feelings, needs, and dreams were respected, listened to, and acted upon 3. The beavers do what they can do! They use their expertise!
  • 22. Inspire or Motivate People To Reach The Vision• How do you motivate people to reach the vision?• “The Gift of the Goose: Cheering Others On”
  • 23. The Gift of the Goose • The Gift of the Goose brings enthusiasm to Spirit of the Squirrel and Way of the Beaver.
  • 24. The Gift of the Goose • The Gift of the Goose is Cheering Others On! • They honk that everything is going great
  • 25. The Gift of the Goose • The Gift of the Goose will make more of a difference than the: Spirit of the Squirrel or The Way of the Beaver
  • 26. Which are YOU?Squirrel Beaver Goose
  • 27. I HAD to go to work.Here, I GET to go to work. Because Everyone is GUNG HO!
  • 28. Team members leave with their heads held high! They KNOW they are doing important work! Both the organization and their fellow workers appreciate their EffortsThey each had a and Success!Significant part of the Success!
  • 29. The Spirit of the Squirrel! The Way of the Beaver! The Gift of the Goose! GUNG HO!
  • 30. Job Satisfaction• #1 reason people leave their jobs- they don’t feel appreciated
  • 31. Positive vs. Negative• How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life by Tom Rath and Donald Clifton, Ph.D.
  • 32. Is negativity really a problem?
  • 33. The Bucket Theory • Invisible bucket and dipper • “9 out of 10 people say they are more productive when they’re around positive people” • Memories • Frequency of positive interactions
  • 34. Positive Interactions• As leaders in your school, think of ways that you currently recognize the achievements of your staff, praise their efforts, and encourage a positive climate among your staff.
  • 35. Teachers/StaffClassroom Climate
  • 36. REVVED! Win them over andKeep them REVVED! by Harry Paul & Ross Reck, Ph.D
  • 37. The Work Place• Too busy to be friendly• “micromanaging”• Bringing anger to work• Bottom line-personal life can sabotage the career, relationships at work (co-workers as well as parents)
  • 38. Nice Managers Get ResultsA group of researchers studied 16,000 corporate managers. The results surprised many skeptics. They showed that the highest achievers were those who valued people as highly as they valued profits.
  • 39. Weak is he who allows his emotions to controlhis actions. Strong is hewho allows his actions to control his emotions.
  • 40. The 2 most important questions you can ask yourself:Is this a classroom you would want your child to be enrolled?Are you a teacher you would want your child to have?
  • 41. Master Your EmotionsEven the best leaders have personal problems at one time or another. In those situations, the most effective leaders reach down inside themselves to find the strength to keep their emotions in check, especially at work.
  • 42. ‘Personality Plus’• It’s not something you are born with, it is something you develop by being nice to people and making them feel special.
  • 43. The Magic RatioThe magic ratio:5 positive interactions for every 1 negative interaction  
  • 44. Caring is absolutely necessary when it comes to getting others excited about doing things on your behalf. That’swhat a supervisor’s, as well asany educator’s job is all about.
  • 45. The following 3 Steps will helpyou maximize the returns thatcome from caring about your mostimportant asset: your students,their parents and your co-workers,in other words: Your People!
  • 46. Take Baby Steps Step 1-Winning them Over • Turning enemies into allies-SMILE • Greet people CHEERFULLY • Actively engage in caring conversation- actively
  • 47. Step 2- Blowing Them Away• Single out people who have just gone the extra mile for you.• Multiplier Effect bonus• Build an Army• Magical Phrase-”Is there anything else I can do for you?”
  • 48. Step 3-Keep them REVVED!• Nothing works better than the truth• Clear the Air• Caring is a Win-Win proposition• Looking out for Number 2• Celebrate your success
  • 49. Group Discussion Questions See Handout #3
  • 50. Take Care of Your “Self”• Educators must continually be aware of his/her attitude, priorities, behavior, and interactions.• One of the greatest individuals in keeping priorities was Randy Pausch. “The Last Lecture” The LAST LECTURE by Randy Pausch Video Clip
  • 51. When You Thought I Wasn’t Looking
  • 52. “Fill In” The Achievement Gap by Building PositiveRelationships to Promote Parental Involvement
  • 53. Parent/Community Involvement Resources•National Network of Partnership SchoolsTIPS Teachers Involve Parents in Schoolwork•http://www.csos.jhu.edu/p2000/tips/index.htm•Annual Promising Practiceshttp://www.csos.jhu.edu/p2000/PPP/2007/index.htm
  • 54. Building Positive Relationships to Promote Parental Involvement It takes EVERYONE To Administrators Build PositiveStudents Climate Staff Relationships and Promote Parents Parent/Community Involvement! We Need YOU!
  • 55. Building Positive Relationships Can “Fill In”the Achievement Gap And Promote Parental/Community Involvement!