CETS 2013 felstehausen 15-25-30-20-10_method handouts

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CETS 2013 felstehausen 15-25-30-20-10_method handouts

  1. 1. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 1 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning The 15-25-30-20-10 Method For Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Synopsis It’s happened again…due to poor planning or lack of ESP, you find yourself in a crisis where you have a few weeks to throw together several hours of e-learning; and because the project was not anticipated, there’s no money and limited access to SMEs. While this sounds like a situation where you can't possibly create training that will meet the learning objectives, you actually have more options than you think. It's just time to get creative and use the 25-15-30-20-10 method for developing fast, low-budget e-learning. In this session, you'll learn about the method, look at a case study where it yielded successful results, and work through a group problem-solving scenario to practice what you've learned. Agenda • Overview of the 15-25-30-20-10 Method • Review of Case Study that Used the Method • Group Application of the Method Key Take-Aways • Fast, low-budget projects present a unique opportunity for you to push back on the business belief/assumption that training will solve any problem. • On fast, low-budgets projects, invest your time in activities that will yield high learner application of desired skills/behaviors back on the job. Maybe you don’t need formal training at all! • When you need to work fast, be strategic about the depth of learner mastery you really need to achieve – most training does not need to produce “masters”! • Be strategic about the quality level of e-learning you really need to build. Developing high-quality CBTs/WBTs take a lot of time and resources, and without appropriate OTJ support, will not yield a high ROI anyway! • Get in touch with "how you sink your ship." Emotional responses, inability to focus on what's most important, and rigid beliefs about how training must be developed (and how long it takes) are the top things that keep you from being successful in these situations. o Stay calm and manage your emotions. Keep things in perspective! o Don't let others misdirect you to build training when it will NOT solve the problem. o Try different things. Don’t be afraid to experiment with cutting corners. o Develop the ability to design and develop training in many different ways - build your design and development repertoire! o Judge success by tangible results (learner/business impact) instead of the bumpiness of the ride. Evaluation URL: https://www.questionmark.com/cets06 Evaluation QR Code (see at right)
  2. 2. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 2 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning The 15-25-30-20-10 Method Spend 15% of your time identifying: • The new skill/behavior you want learners to achieve and what that will look like back on the job (aka performance or learning objectives). • If applicable, the root causes of the current behavior. • Spend at least 25% of your time figuring out ways to support the new skills/ behaviors once back on the job. • Maybe you don’t need training at all! • NOTE: Most business problems cannot be solved with training. • If formal training is necessary, spend ~30% of your time extracting the content from SMEs and writing and organizing it WELL. • Be strategic about the depth of learner mastery needed! Most training does NOT need to create “masters” of the new behavior/skill. If you have systems for reinforcing/supporting the skill/behavior back on the job, you only need to get learners to the beginner level. • Be strategic about the quality of CBTs/WBTs you create. The increased time/cost to build "fancy" e-learning does not necessary yield a proportional ROI in business impact. • If training is necessary (and maybe even if it’s not), spend 20% of your time creating ways for the learner to apply and/or practice the new behavior/skill. • Practice can be no-frills and back on-the-job, if needed. Spend ~10% of your time creating ways to assess learner mastery and/or evaluate business impact.
  3. 3. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 3 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning After-Training OTJ Support The following three steps will help you identify ways to support learners after training. 1. Determine where on the job, and when, learners will use the new skill, knowledge, or behavior. 2. Identify any person, paper, machine, or electronic tool they will have available when they execute the new skill, use the new knowledge, or display the new behavior. 3. Determine how you can tap into these people, papers, machines, or electronic tools to remind learners of, or support learners to use, the new skill, knowledge, behavior. Ideas for After-Training OTJ Support • Train supervisors on the change/new skill and get upper management’s commitment that they will incent supervisors to teach/enforce the new behavior/skill on-the-job. • Provide managers with a coaching tool or performance checklists to use to evaluate and coach/mentor learners on the new skill or behavior. • Build the performance objectives of the training into learners’ performance reviews (i.e. have their managers evaluate them on how well they achieved the new performance objectives). • Build performance of the new skill or behavior into an existing SOP, form, or tool that learners use on the job (while executing the new skill or behavior) so that learners will be reminded of the new skill or behavior every time they execute the task. • Create coaching or mentoring relationships pairing high and low performers. • Send periodic emails or newsletters to learners after the training reminding them to use the new skill, knowledge, behavior. Share success stories, offer advice to overcome challenges, answer FAQs, etc. • Create a social media site (or other computer-based site) and invite learners to ask questions, share success stories, or ask for advice for handling situations that will rely on the new skill, knowledge, behavior. • Create posters to hang in learners’ workspaces to remind them of the new skill, knowledge, or behavior. • Survey learners and their managers 15, 30, 45, and/or 60 days after the training and collect success stories, lessons learned, challenges, etc. Share this information back with all learners (via email or social media site). Use this information to enhance the training and/or to recommend additional training. • Create some type of contest for learners to reward them for demonstrating the new skill, knowledge, or behavior. Award prizes. • Have learners create action plans at the end of the training. Send learners’ managers copies of these action plans and ask/require them to follow-up with and support learners in implementing these plans. OR create some other system for following-up on the achievement of these plans. • Provide learners with a job aid to post in their workspaces reminding them of the new skill or behavior. Send them new versions of this information periodically to keep it fresh and in their minds. • Have learners complete self, manager, and/or 360 evaluations before the training and at periodic intervals after the training to measure behavioral change. Reward learners in some meaningful way for achieving certain levels of behavioral change. • Monitor any applicable performance or business stats to see if/how they change after the training.
  4. 4. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 4 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Tips for Creating Content FAST! Tip #1: • Record the SME explaining/ demoing the skill/behavior (preferably with screen-sharing tool like WebEx). • Use recording to quickly transcribe steps, concepts, screenshots, and other important info. • Document content in a usable learner format (wiki, website, SOP, database, job aid, slideshow, Word doc, Visio diagram, etc.). • Provide links to additional info learners might use/need later. • Use content and links for training and OTJ support. Tip #2: • Help SME record a lecture/ demo of skills/behaviors (WebEx-like tool or video). • Convert recording to movie file for learners to watch. • Give learners an activity/test to complete as they watch the movie to hold interest and prove mastery. Tip #3: • Put content into an electronic repository to provide learners with OTJ/JIT learning and support. • For training: o Provide an overview of the new skill/ behavior. o Explain the benefits and the WHY – tend to motivation! o Show learners what new skill/behavior looks like/how it works on the job. o Teach them how to use the repository. o Teach any foundational skills/ knowledge needed to use the repository or self-learn the content. Tip #4: • Create a self-study activity that learners complete on their own to “self-discover” the content and prove that they’ve mastered it. • Could be a: scavenger hunt with key questions to answer; a practice exercise in a test database; a team-based research or problem- solving project; a teach-back exercise; etc.
  5. 5. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 5 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning What Depth of Learner Mastery Do You Really Need? • Most training does NOT need to create “masters” of the new behavior/skill. • If you have systems for reinforcing/supporting the skill/ behavior back on the job, you only need to get learners to the beginner level. • Be strategic about what information you really need to provide! • If you need to compromise on content development, compromise on the DEPTH of the information provided. What Quality of Learning Do You Really Need to Build? QUESTION: If you spend 160 hours per seat hour creating learning vs. spending 80 hours vs. spending 40 hours - what will be the difference in the return on learner application and business impact? ANSWER: If you want real business impact, spend LESS time building learning and MORE time creating ways to support learning and behavioral change back on the job! Training without OTJ support does not add much value!
  6. 6. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 6 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Case Study of the 15-25-30-20-10 Method Situation • Large, global company who was converting a major job process to a new, proprietary software platform. • Small, global audience (60 people in US, Canada, and India). • Business did not request training support from L&D until 3 weeks before it was needed! • Software developers had not yet documented any processes or how to use the platform. • No test database available for development or training – learners would have to practice and master software OTJ. Two Phases of Training Development Due to short timeframe, training was developed in 2 phases. • PHASE 1: For the first 5 (alpha) client teams who needed to use the platform. Created 10 CBTs (with 6.5 hours total seat time). • PHASE 2: For the next group of client teams (8 weeks later). Made corrections to original CBTs as needed and created an additional 4 hours of training (3 more CBTs) on more advanced and complex topics needed by smaller audience. Design Approach • Needed 6.5 total hours of learning. • SMEs were available to lead virtual debriefs to review key points and answer questions as needed. • Almost abandoned idea of creating learning. • What learners needed most was step-by-step procedures for performing required tasks with screenshots and examples - loaded into popular, well-used database for easy employee access. BUT, this idea was rejected as learners wanted CBTs and self-checks, and management wanted to track completion. • Decided to document procedures in Powerpoint that could be converted to text file for database loading AND imported into Captivate; add self-checks; publish as SCORM. High Level Phase 1 Learning Objectives By the end of this training, you should be able to: • List and explain the main differences between HRW 4.3 and 5.x. • List and describe the new features and functionality of HRW 5.x. • Describe the benefits of HRW 5.x to clients, configuration and testing staff, and the company. • Access and review a list of tasks that need to be performed to set up a client’s website using HRW 5.x. • Identify which configuration tasks are performed by the HRW 5.x Core Support Team and which are performed by the Client Team. • Find instructions and forms for working with the HRW 5.x Core Support Team. • Find and follow instructions for completing required configuration tasks to set up a client’s website using the new HRW 5.x platform.
  7. 7. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 7 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Training Development Team • 1 PM, 1 Lead ID, 2 regular IDs, 4 SMEs from HRW 5.x Core Support Team • 1 ID and 1 SME assigned to each CBT “module” Phase 1 Training Development Approach Unexpected Benefits • When questions/requests for support came to Core Support Team (who created software), they were able to answer 80% of questions by providing links to the relevant training content in this database. • Being able to provide these links greatly increased speed at which the Core Support Team could respond to support requests. • In addition, when employees searched the database for problem resolution, search results led them back to the training content. Case Study: Key Take-Aways • In this situation we did NOT try to achieve learner mastery of required tasks in training. • As quality training was not possible, we focused on creating performance support documentation that could be easily accessed by learners when they needed to perform the task and used by the Core Support Team for technical support. • We did create low-quality CBTs in addition to OTJ support as learners expected/ demanded CBTs to build confidence. • Documentation is still used today, indicating the quality of the solution! • AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT: We did not create a formal method for assessing learner mastery or evaluating business impact. The measures were there, but not realized until after the roll-out.
  8. 8. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 8 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Group Application of 25-15-30-20-10 Method Background and Situation • You work for a company called KitchenWare. This is a national company with 8,000 employees that sells kitchen appliances (including commercial grade blenders) to restaurants and bars. • KitchenWare has ~2,560 sales reps who work remotely and travel to restaurants in their assigned district to sell products. They are on the road 4 days a week with Monday being their at home, planning and administration day. • The VP of Sales is the head of the sales division. The sales division is divided into 8 sales regions each headed by a Regional Manager (RM). Each region has 8 sub-regions headed by a Sub-Regional Manager (SRM) (for a total of 64 sub-regions). Each sub- region has 8 districts each headed by a District Manager (DM) (for a total of 512 districts). Each district has about 5 sales reps. • You are the Manager of the Sales Training department. You report to the VP of Sales. • You have a staff of 5: 1 ID/PM, 3 Sales Trainers, and 1 Training Coordinator. Problem • It's Friday, 8/23. The VP of Sales calls you into her office. She just came from a meeting with the President who is very upset! • An analysis was performed on the return rates of defective blenders. This analysis showed that over the past year there has been 28% customer return rate of the B400 Commercial Blender within the warranty period because the blender stopped performing at expected levels. This return rate and the resulting loss in customer retention is costing the company $5.5 million yearly! • A more detailed analysis of these returns showed that they were all from restaurants and bars that had purchased this blender to make drinks with crushed ice. The problem is that this blender was not designed for that usage. It is designed for low volume use to make softer drink products such as ice cream shakes or fruit smoothies. It does not have the power to crush ice continuously at high cycle times. • The President has decided that the sales reps are not adequately pre-qualifying customers to find out how they plan to use the blender nor are they properly matching the right blender to the right commercial application. They should be selling the B700 model of blender for this use. • The VP of Sales wants you to drop everything and quickly put together an e-learning program that must be taken by the sales force on Monday September 16th (deployed via your LMS. • The e-learning program should teach sales reps the following skills: o The intended commercial applications for all five models of blenders sold by KitchenWare. o How to use good questioning and listening skills to find out how customers want to use the blender they are considering buying. o How to match the right blender to the customer's situation. • Success of the training will be measured by monitoring the sales of B400 Blenders and their defect and return rates over the next 6-9 months. Goal is to reduce return rates to under 5%. (continued on next page)
  9. 9. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 9 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning • Kitchenware uses WebEx/conference calls for virtual meetings; virtual meetings have a capacity of 45 attendees. • This is a top priority project. You are empowered to involve and request resources or actions from any other department you need including HR, Legal, Marketing, etc. • The President, VP of Sales, and other Senior Management are available to record video or audio messages, attend meetings, or perform other actions per your request (you must supply the script/outline for their review/approval, though). Information from Ann and Hideo, Sales • Product Training: o When joining the company, all sales reps are trained on the features and intended uses of all products, including the 5 blenders. o Features and uses of products are reviewed periodically at national and regional sales meetings. The last time the blenders were featured at one of these meetings was 2 years ago. o Both Ann and Hideo think a review of blender product features and intended uses might be useful. Hideo thinks the sales force already knows this information, though. • Selling Model: o When joining the company, all sales reps are trained on the selling model. They are taught how to pre-qualify the customer (find out their needs and match products to those needs). o The sales force has received no additional training on pre-qualifying customers or questioning and listening techniques in the past 3 years. o Pre-qualifying is not a major focus of the selling model. Both Ann and Hideo think sales reps need more training on this topic. • Sales Coaching: District Managers (DMs) ride along with each sales rep once every other week to make sure they are following the selling model, describing products accurately, and adhering to company policies. o Hideo does not think the DMs emphasize questioning or listening or pre-qualifying customers as this is not a major part of the selling model. o Ann says that this year DMs have been focused on selling against competitive products and handling objections. o Neither Ann nor Hideo have heard any specific concerns coming from sales managers pertaining to blender sales. Information from Mike, Blender Product Manager • Sales of the B400 have dramatically increased this year because, at the beginning of the year, Kitchenware lowered the price so it is now one of the lowest priced commercial blenders. It is now a company best-seller. • The B700 is the best blender on the commercial market for crushing ice, but it is also one of the most expensive. Customers love the performance of this blender but wish it were cheaper. Mike is looking into ways to decrease the cost of the blender and they are coming out with an "improved" version of this blender next year that will be $150 cheaper.
  10. 10. Chicago e-Learning and Technology Showcase, August 2013 All rights reserved, 2013. 10 of 10 Felste Learning Works, LLC kris.felstehausen@sbcglobal.net 847-776-6552 The 15-25-30-20-10 Method for Fast, Low-Budget e-Learning Information from Sheila, VP of Sales Operations • The commission structure on the 5 blenders did change at the beginning of the year (see the product info and commission structure in the table below). Sales of the B300 and B400 were down so they sweetened the commissions and bonuses on these 2 blenders to increase sales. • Commissions and bonuses on the B700 are lower because the profit margin on this blender is smaller due to the higher production costs. • Sales reps are not penalized for product defects or customer returns. Blender Products and Sales Rep Commission/Bonus Structure • Sales Reps are paid a low base salary plus commission and bonus. Product Use Price Commission Annual Bonus B300 Spacesaver (smallest) countertop blender for low volume operations for smoothies, ice cream, coffee, mixing drinks, etc. $399 6% $5,000 for meeting sales annual quota $7,000 for exceeding annual quota by 5% $9,000 for exceeding annual quota by 10% B400 Larger countertop blender designed for low volume operations for smoothies, ice cream, coffee, mixing drinks, etc. $499 6% $5,000 for meeting sales annual quota $7,000 for exceeding annual quota by 5% $9,000 for exceeding annual quota by 10% B500 Self-serve delivery of blended drinks (with ice, water, and liquid or juice concentrate) direct to customers with 64 drink combos and 3 drink sizes $3,999 5% $4,000 for meeting sales annual quota $6,000 for exceeding annual quota by 5% $8,000 for exceeding annual quota by 10% B600 Dispenser blender to dispense up to 8 precisely- measured products for smoothies, ice cream, coffee, mixing drinks, etc. $3,499 5% $4,000 for meeting sales annual quota $6,000 for exceeding annual quota by 5% $8,000 for exceeding annual quota by 10% B700 Large, countertop blender designed for high volume operations including crushing ice and chopping/pureeing harder foods such as nuts, carrots, etc. $699 4% $3,000 for meeting sales annual quota $5,000 for exceeding annual quota by 5% $7,000 for exceeding annual quota by 10%

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