1907 LCHS Messenger newsletter

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1907 LCHS Messenger newsletter

  1. 1. - ;;, - !f ", .. 1 i1 t~ PUBLISHEDBY THE LUTHERAN ORPHAN HOME. v 1907.III. ~alem,Virgi ta, Oct. HOME DIRECTORY. PRES. OF BOARn, REV. L. A. Fox, D. D. S'.LEI-[, VA. VWE-PR"SIDENT, COL. A. !.t. BOWMAN, SA- LEM, VA. tiRe. OF BOARD, R. W. Kl m e, Esq .• SALElll VA. 'lREAS. OF BOARD, M:. PAUL >5. DAV1S SALEM, VA. ~UPERINTENDEKT1 J. T. CRABTREE, fOAJ.EM, VA. MATRON, MRS. G. V. RUHL, ROUS!;KEEPER, MISS. DORA BARRIER. TEACHER,Miss Nellie H. Copenhaver. 1:'1tIMARY '.rEACHER,Mrs. K. S. Crabtree. Sewing Teacber, MrS. Anna Riser. OCTOBER. The month of forests with rain- bow hues, at "the frost on the pum- kin, and the fodder in the shock" is here. How beautiful and how suggestive. The month of rich in- gathering and of plans for the com- ing winter. Our profound bow to all our friends: We hope everyone of you has prospered during the year. In your closing plans include the HOQ",e,please. ..---- ~---.-- NO "MEANS" YET. We are beginning work on the October paper on Sept. 6th. At this date we have only $225 in cash l-.---- and promises on the heating of the Building. Shall we have heat this winter? The answer is with you. THE LAUNDRY FLOOR,. Yesterday morning Sept. 5th, the Laundry Floor was begun in earnest. It is being being pushed rapidly, and will be done by the time our arid Form goes to press. Rejoice with us. Another great want is now being "placed on the shelf." Now we car.not help thinking of our heat,-or rather, the lack of it. But it is coming, we FEEL that it is coming. • "ELSIE" BOOKS. The children are wondering if some one has a set of the "Elsie" Books that they no longer need and would like to send them to our Harne. Who will send these books? Georgia Cane. That G~orgia Cane Syrup left a lingering sweetness in our minds and in our mouths. Wasn't it good. It took fully a gallon per day for our children.
  2. 2. ll'U'f.ll 1l1MRS~1l:']i"lTG~n ical student, had been doing work . !l.f1Jll~.!l.'''''~~Ib;J.~ .t3.n. among the poor, neglected boys for over a year, and he was brimtul of zeal in this work,-but he had never spoken in public in his life. How- THE LUTHERAN ORPHAN HOM E ever, he rose to his feet, hesitated a rnoment.and then went forward at the repeated request of the pastor. . He forgot himself in his subject.and ~:ing-~e Sunscription, one year :>.5 talked in a simple, earnest WAY, of III Clubs of ten or more 20 his wo k and experiences,- and the ('0 one address ten copies ,1' audience became so aroused that,by ,!,(lre [(,'I cents eac h. turns, they laug ated.cried, applaud- ,-··-c= "'1 ed and groaned. This strauze ef-,,::t;f' ,"~I, <ubscrrptions must be paid ~ feet upon the assembly was report- for in advance. ______________________ ed in the daily papers. Lord Shafts- Entered at the Post-Office m bury was moved by the reports and Salem, Va., as second-class matier: wrote the young- Doctor a note in- viting him to dinner at all early giv- en date. At this dinner was quite a party of philanthropists, also i.i- vited to hear more of this work. At the table, Dr. Bernardo was asked to give a full account of his work, which he did, ending- with the find- ing of poor little Jim Jarvis, who vias parentless, friendless, homeless, without even a place to sleep at night. The company at the table A LEAF FROM THE BOOK OF could not believe that there were ORPHAN HOME LIFE. such cases of destitution in the Me- tropolis of the world, and Shafts- bury himself said to Bernardo, "Doctor, do you really think that there are now any such homeless, houseless children in London?" "Certainly, Sir." "Could you lead the way to find any such cases to- night?" Bernardo promptly replied that he was sure he could .. Then his Lordship said, "Then, gentle- men, get ready: I'll order cabs." hi ,Very soon t IS whole company, dressed in eveningattire, was on its way from the Shaftsbury Mansion toward the E;ut End.led by liIhaft.- Published monthly by S:1.£:'1, VIRCTNIA. RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION. DIRECTfbNS FOR SHIPPING. In advance n letter should be sent to he Sup t., giving an accurate list of ar- trcles and names of donors (no at.ten tion is paid to names on packages, etc To get free transportation over the Southern R'y and Atlantic Coast Line Address the Supt at least ten days prev- ious; or apply to local agent. The N. & W. give half rates when not~~. SCENE:-Mission Service in Rev. Thain Davidson's Church, London. The Time near the Middle of the Last Century:-A Speaker, engaged for the evening, faded to appear when his time to speak had corne. There was a temporary pause in the meeting, and then the Pastor arose and said, "I see Dr. Bernardo in the audience. As" I know that he is interested in Mission work in this city, I will take the liberty of asking him to come upon the plat- form and tell us something of his w0rk." The Doctor reallp a med-
  3. 3. greatly renew our boys' and our girls' Dormitories in th e articles of Bedsteads and Mattresses. SMALL SUMS would be equally useful and important. Gathered mites become mighty, and sums of A WORTHY PLAN all sizes wo:!ld make up the necces- From" The Lutheran" of August sary aggregate with which t meet 29th we learn that Mrs. A. E. Bern- our monthly expenses. he im of North Carolina, has offered How many of our friends to give the Chicago synod 5000, will change the "WOULD" into Gin which it is to ply interet to l "WILL?" bury and Bern ar do in the first cab. After a rapid drive they arrived in a locality where the Doctor was sure he could find the waifs. After hunting about some time he spoke '[Q a Policemen, telling him the rea- son of their presence in the locality, and the objects of his search. Point- iug toward a filthy, open court pil- ed with old crates, boxes and bar- rels, over which an old tarpaulin was spread, he said, "They're in there. Offer 'em a ha', penny a- piece and they will come out." A call was made, offering the money, and very soon out of these boxes, barrels and crates came ONE,TWO, THREE,-until seventy-three rag- ged, homeless little ones stood blinking their sleepy eyes before the tearful ones of their astonished callers. Bernardo was very sad at the sight, but very happy inhavin g so fully proved his case. Lord Shaftsbury broke up the sad scene and suspense by calling the whole company to follow him. He led the way to "Dick Fisher's Coffee Shop, open all night,". which was not very far away, where each one was given a good meal an d the promised ha' penny. That was the turning point in Bernardo's work. It grew wonder- fully from that night. The gentle- men of the Dining party were all Fully Convinced, and followed the pointing of the Finger of Provi- idence in the leadership of Bernar- do, herself and husband while they live, and at death the principal is to become the absolute property of the Synod for the purpose of Home Mission work in Illinois. This P an has its advantages. It sets at rest the disposition of the amount of property, or cash, that the owner wishes to devote to a certain purpose. It makes a safe life-investment the interest of whitch the owner may use as neces sity or inclination may indicate. It inspires the confidence of friends 111 the cause thus being finally helped. .. WHAT IT WOULD DO. Seventy-five Dollars would buy us a small car of coal and pay the freight on it, but $10') would buy a larger one. Seventy-five Dollars would buy an ample out fit of winter under- wear, and overwear, too, with hats, caps and other necessaries. MONEY TO BUY about 210 sq. yds of metal ceiling and to pay for putting it on the Dining Room would make the aforesaid room one of great neatness and beauty,-and a "joy" for years to come,-if not "for- ever." ONE HUNDRED Dollars would
  4. 4. NEEDED GIFT~ L;.J" KI).'l>. IOf ...·TO. {rom t'Je St jarnes Si Schoo, S rEET POT!.TOES woi.ld hf' Concord, N". C.. as "Birth-Day very acc-ptable no 1'. Do not wait Off 'ring ". How many other until the weather is cold enough t Schools will take up this plan? Some freeze them on the way to us. one has suggested that all young IRISH POTATOES are very use- Misses, after arriving at sixt een, ful in our Home, and we are prepar- simply <lip in Q quarter and refuse ed to take care of any number of to answer ar y further question on bags and barrels that you may send. the subject of age. SOME CABBAGE would help out our bill of fare very nicely. Send SOme. ANYTHING eata- ble in country homes would be very eatable in our Home. • OTHER NEEDS. Our Laundry Stov is badly warp- ed and craked, and is in danger of giving out very soon. $25.00 would buy a new one. Six slatestone tubs in the Laundry will cost $42.00 We need about three large heating stoves for use this win ter. They wi 11 cost $r2.00 each. We need two cars of coal. A 30 ton car will cost, with half-freight, $75. 00. Have our friends decided that OUI Sieam heat is n-it necessary? We hope for more I:eat soon. If the weather gets very cold this winter, please pay us a visit a no form your own opinion on the heat question. Some repair" are needed in the Building. Delay means further damage. YES: IT IS DONE. Our Laundry Floor is finished, completed, clone. An Expert says it is good work. We are happy.sand very thankful to each and all the friends who helped to do this work. BIR T H-DA Y OFFERINGS. We recently received a remittance GIFTS L T KIND Received from Aug. 25th to Sept. 25th, 1907: W. R. Price, Rura! Retreat, Va., I Crate cabbage; Samuel D. Goode, Salem, Va .. 35 bu apples; W. C. Cood , Salem, Ya., 35 b 1 apples, 3 bu tomatoes; ).[r5. S. E. K.egley, Wytheville, t Comfort, [ Coun er- pane; Mrs. Clarke, S ilern, Va. Nice fresh buttermilk; Co!. A. M. Bowman, 3 bu tomatoes, I No. I I Ohio Feed Cutter. SPECIAL GIFT: Capt. J. C. Seegers, Columbia, S. C., has given us 63 pairs of good, stout wlnter shoes. Thank you, Friends, one and all. • CASH RECE~ VED From August 25th to September 26th, 1907. Corinth S. School, $13.05; Prof. T. IT. R. Christie, 22.50; Rev. W. C. Seidel, 25.00; Post Cards, 3.54; George E. Witte, 25.00; Rent, I.40; M. L. Rudisil, 5.00; H. L. Ph leger, 5.,)0; J. IV. Williams, 3.00; St.James S. S .. Concord. Birthday Offerings, 10.00; Mrs. J. D. Harner, 1.00; G. C. Hines, Winston-Salem, 5.00; Iorth River Conf., of Va. Synod, 2.25; MISS Bet tie E. Johnston, 1.50. A MaTHE'S COUNS L. The gr at men of the world have e-enrael1y owed m~J<;h to the charact-
  5. 5. for and trai~in~ of their mother, I his own b siriess is never over tru t htul.y say'" "rhe Evangelrcal." If we go Lack L() their childhood we see there the maternal infiue ces which form the aims and habi s of their future life. Bayard, the flower of the Frenc knight hood, the soldier ithout fear or reproach, never forgot the parting words of his mother, w en he left home to become the page of a nobleman. With all the tenderness of a loving heart, she said: "My boy, serve God first. Pray to him night and morning. Be kind and charitable to all. Beware of flat- terers, and never be one yourself. Avoid envy, hatred and lying, as vices un worthy of a Christian; and never egtect to comfort widows and orphans." When Bayard was foremost in battle, confessedly the bravest w r- rior in the field, or when, in his own great thirst, he was giving water to a dying enemy, he was only carry- ing out nis mother's counsel and striving to be worthy of her na-rre. The memory of a mother's love is a talisman against temptation and a stimulus to a good life. A Few Guide Post!'. A Studious son isa delight to his father. To keep the wisdom you already havo you must have more. Ore hour in the home with your bOOFS' isworth two in the street. You may think it is fun to do the thing which your teacher or parents tell you not to do, but while you are being reproved for it the other boys will think it is [un.-William J. Butcher in American Boy, Be clean; think clean. The man who attends strictly to worked. Paint strin« may be removed by ap 1) ing turpentine at once. H mortals here below didn't want so many fool things there wo lei be a heap more faith in the efficacy of prayer. The man who defends profanity on the o-r nnd that it is a safety valve for his temper is at the blow- ing-off point most of the time. Dont advertise your woes; there are plenty to go around. The education of the spirit is more important than of the hand. Religious education must be se- cured for our youth or we halT have a race of lusty pagans instead of self-restrained Christians. There must be one mor-il standard for home an office. The faults of the burglar are the qualities of the .financier. THE ROANOKE FAIR. Yes: We were there again this year. Everyb dy went on the 24th. We left the H me in charge of our good neighbor, Mr. Howery, and he kindly kept everything safe for us. Wecannot even begin to tell you all that we saw, but we had such a pleasant day, We enjoyed the Trolley rides and the Fair, and we hereby tender our sincere thanks to ~he Supt. of the Roanoke Street Railway, and to the Secretary of the Fair for their kindness and favors shown us. 1# --Usually people try to do, and want to do, the work they imagine will give them the most money or the hi rhes t standing, whether they arc fit for it or not.
  6. 6. DO YOU TIRE OF IT? The needs and Wants of each month are made so prominent that we really fear that many of our readers must become tired of it. That is ONE view of the case'. Here is the OTHER SIDE. Many of our friends whom we meet, say to us, "NO :NO; We are. not tired. Keep on telling y~ur NEEDS. How are we to know what you need, unless you tell us?" Now, this encourages us, so we will continue to keep right along in the line of giving monthly Notes of NEEDS. Pick up any paper of another Home and you will find the same thing. As It sample from one of our largest and best Homes, the "Tress- ler", at Loysville, Pa., we take the liberty of quoting, in full, the follow- ing, from their September O. H. Echoes, and will say that it nearly fills our a wn case and "NE EDS." It is sensible, and to the point: "THE NEEDS OF THE HOME. These are many and are constant- ly recurring. The purpose of the Institution in its founding- was to provide a home for destitute orphan children of the church. The church is the spiritual mother of the chil- dren and therefore in their need she undertakes to care for them. This presupposes that she will meet the needs of her childaen. They ought to be provided for ordinarily well. Not so well as the most fa vored in the church. Not so sparingly as the less favored of the Lord's people, but with the ordinary comforts of the great medium class. The needs of this great family of the poo rare ordinarily and every day the follow- ing: Good, wholesome food, and plenty of it. These children have good appetites. They can generally eat three times a day. To supply the tables requires a large amount of food daily. Bread, potatoes, beans, peas, corn, fruits, meat, rice, etc., by the bushel, barrel and pound. Clothing, shoes, stockings ,and all kinds of wearing apparel. It re- quires yards and yards of goods, dozens and dozens of pairs of stock- ings and shoes, and lots of money to buy these. It takes hundreds of tons of coal to furnish heat, and hundreds of gallons of gasoline for light and power. and all this takes money. These children are to be cared for and taught and trained for use- ful lives and to do this, men and women are employed who must be paid, and this item of expence is considerable. But it is absolutely necessary, for it were the mockery to furnish a horae simply to shelter these children, and not help them to grow into useful and worthy men and women. There must be buildings to ac- commodate all these children, school-rooms, work-rooms, play- rooms, closets and pantries and liv- ing rooms for the helpers. These buildings must be kept in repair, must be renewed and enlarged as the famiiy increases in size. All this costs money. These are all ordinary, every- day needs that must be met. The church is the only provider we can look to. She will not disappoint her children."
  7. 7. DO YOU TIRE OF IT? The needs and Wants of each month are made so prominent that we really fear that many of our readers must become tired of it. That is ONE view of the case'. Here is the OTHER SIDE. Many of our friends whom we meet, say to us, "NO :NO; We are. not tired. Keep on telling y~ur NEEDS. How are we to know what you need, unless you tell us?" Now, this encourages us, so we will continue to keep right along in the line of giving monthly Notes of NEEDS. Pick up any paper of another Home and you will find the same thing. As It sample from one of our largest and best Homes, the "Tress- ler", at Loysville, Pa., we take the liberty of quoting, in full, the follow- ing, from their September O. H. Echoes, and will say that it nearly fills our a wn case and "NE EDS." It is sensible, and to the point: "THE NEEDS OF THE HOME. These are many and are constant- ly recurring. The purpose of the Institution in its founding- was to provide a home for destitute orphan children of the church. The church is the spiritual mother of the chil- dren and therefore in their need she undertakes to care for them. This presupposes that she will meet the needs of her childaen. They ought to be provided for ordinarily well. Not so well as the most fa vored in the church. Not so sparingly as the less favored of the Lord's people, but with the ordinary comforts of the great medium class. The needs of this great family of the poo rare ordinarily and every day the follow- ing: Good, wholesome food, and plenty of it. These children have good appetites. They can generally eat three times a day. To supply the tables requires a large amount of food daily. Bread, potatoes, beans, peas, corn, fruits, meat, rice, etc., by the bushel, barrel and pound. Clothing, shoes, stockings ,and all kinds of wearing apparel. It re- quires yards and yards of goods, dozens and dozens of pairs of stock- ings and shoes, and lots of money to buy these. It takes hundreds of tons of coal to furnish heat, and hundreds of gallons of gasoline for light and power. and all this takes money. These children are to be cared for and taught and trained for use- ful lives and to do this, men and women are employed who must be paid, and this item of expence is considerable. But it is absolutely necessary, for it were the mockery to furnish a horae simply to shelter these children, and not help them to grow into useful and worthy men and women. There must be buildings to ac- commodate all these children, school-rooms, work-rooms, play- rooms, closets and pantries and liv- ing rooms for the helpers. These buildings must be kept in repair, must be renewed and enlarged as the famiiy increases in size. All this costs money. These are all ordinary, every- day needs that must be met. The church is the only provider we can look to. She will not disappoint her children."
  8. 8. ---------------------------~--------------------------------------- NGLAND'S NOTED CHILD SAVER. Dr. Bernardo's Life reads like an ense romance,-but it is the ra- nee of fact, of real life, and fum- es another illustration of the say- : that "truth is stranger than tion." His great Orphan work s begun in :"ondon 42 years ago , at the time of his death, two irs ago, the following are the 1St accurate statistics of the work: There were 121 Branches, with 3 Boys and Girls under their care, i the income for 1904 was $937, ;, Thirteen children are admitted ~ry 24 hours. The number whol- maintained in 1903 was 10905. uring the year 3827 fresh cases re admitted. Throughout the 40 irs of their existence the homes ve saved 58,600 "unwanted, desti- e childreu. 17264 bave been emi- tted, and less than 1Yz per cent these have proved 'failures. The ·is· Village consists of 64 Cot- ;es and 9. separate buildings. )6 Girls are in residence. Food ne costs $1200 per day. Though , Founder is no more, tl.e work I be carr ied on, for it has been -ularly chartered under the tish government, and has the port and sympathy of the Brit- nation. Let the Heart Do its Share. 't takes enthusiasm to do a thing it ought to be done, ariel the big- . the task the more crying this .d. If going through with a duty chanically gives reasonably good ults, be sure that the addition of erest and enthusiasm would be .ductive of somethiug'f ar better. Do 1I0t leave the entire responsibil- ity of achiev ernen t on your brain. Let the heart do its share. When judgement and deliberation have done their utmost, add to these the dynamic force of enthusiasm. .... It is true that boys are not always appreciated at first, but who is? If they keep toiling on, their turn wile come by and by. "A few great men are needed to do a few great things, but many are needed to fill well the many common places in life .. If you cannot be one of the few, you can be one of the many." The farmer must not lose his independence, his initia tive, his rug- ged self-sufficiency; and yet he must learn to work in the heartiest cooperation with his fellows.- Theod »re Roosevelt. To be sure, a farmer's life has work in it, but how much better to Jive and work out in God's breezy world, so full of health arid beauty, than to live, labor and "loaf" penned up in a city, never setting foot on the soil, but spending the days in toil and the nights in foly and dissipation! A great many parent!' have a foolish notion that thev want to raise their children so they will not have to work. Great horn spoon! What is a pestiferous human specimen worth that does not have to work? Why, there is not an hour of success or happiness in this world or an r other for one IV ho does not. And you never made a bigger blunder in your life than to imagIne that nobody works except the man with &. hoe, a pick or a handsaw- •

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