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Indrani Thuraisingham - DRM Presentation

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  • Transcript

    • 1. The global voice for consumers La voix des Consommateurs à travers le monde La voz global para la defensa de los consumidores Digital Rights Management
    • 2. Copyright project
      • In 2005 CIKL successfully conducted a project titled ’Copyright and Access to Knowledge'
      • The main findings were that:
        • Copyright limits access to knowledge in developing countries
        • Although international treaties include exceptions and limitations to copyright to enhance access to knowledge, most countries don't use these provisions fully
    • 3. Digital Rights Management and A2K
      • In March this year, CIKL extended the copyright project and did a study on Digital Rights Management or DRM.
      • To assess the impact of DRM the office bought 5 e-books and 8 academic articles online
      • The findings were disappointing, like copyright DRM also limits the access to knowledge, the barriers posed by DRM are even higher.
    • 4. What is DRM
      • DRM controls and manages copyright in a digital world.
      • DRM includes various protection measures:
        • License agreements
        • Technological protection
    • 5.
      • Fortunately, there were not many restrictions on the use of academic articles. Once downloaded they could be copied and printed as many times as the user wanted.
      • The download period was however restricted, some articles were only available for downloading for 24 hours.
      Academic Journals: user-friendliness
    • 6. Academic Journals: Price
      • The average price of an academic article is $25
      • A US citizen has to spend 0.69% of his monthly income to obtain this article
      • Somebody from India or Cambodia, has to spend 41.67% and 75.95% respectively of her monthly income to buy the same article!
      • Some excesses:
        • One article could be bought from different content providers, the price ranged from $29 to $42.36
        • One article was only one page long and cost $30, meaning a dollar per sentence!
    • 7.
      • Two of the five books couldn't be printed, not even a page.
      • From two of the five books, nothing could be copied and pasted into another document, not even a word.
      • Four of the five books could be accessed on only a limited number of computers, this number was sometimes as low as three.
      • One book could only be read online and had an expiry date. For $78 a book could be read for only 150 days, after that, access was gone.
      E-books: user-friendliness
    • 8.
      • Like for academic articles, e-books are unaffordable for consumers in developing countries
      • In developing countries, the price of a hard copy edition is even lower than that for a digital version of the same book
      • An example: Financial Management, Principles and Applications
      E-books: price
    • 9. E-books: price II
      • Comparison of online price with hard-copy price
      • Online price in relation to a country’s living standards
    • 10. Conclusion
      • The technological protection measures used by copyright holders are very consumer unfriendly
      • The technological protection measures used pose extra barriers to access to knowledge in developing countries
      • Protected content is simply unaffordable for the average consumer in developing countries.
    • 11. Next steps I: more research
      • Unfortunately, there are more problems.
        • DRM can inflict a consumer's privacy
        • DRM can not accommodate fair use
        • DRM enables the copyright holder to extend its rights beyond what is provided for in national copyright laws
    • 12. Next steps II: campaigning
      • Companies
        • Hold them accountable for their appropriation of more rights at the disadvantage of the consumer
        • Make them use DRM in an enabling way in stead of a restricting way. TPMs can also be used to differentiate in price for example
      • Governments
        • Were copyright laws intended to protect the copyright holder from infringement, now copyright laws should protect the consumer in stead.
    • 13. The global voice for consumers La voix des Consommateurs à travers le monde La voz global para la defensa de los consumidores Thank you for your attention

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