Presented	
  by	
  
Alec	
  Klein	
  
Professor,	
  Medill	
  School	
  of	
  Journalism	
  
Northwestern	
  University	
 ...
¡  I	
  was	
  accused	
  of	
  being	
  like	
  this.	
  
¡  We’re	
  supposed	
  to	
  not	
  know.	
  
¡  Have	
  th...
¡  New	
  at	
  WSJ	
  
¡  Ordered	
  to	
  write	
  lead	
  news	
  story	
  
¡  IBM	
  
¡  Earnings	
  
¡  Sweat	
 ...
¡  You	
  may	
  know	
  the	
  answer	
  already.	
  
¡  To	
  wit:	
  How	
  old	
  are	
  you?	
  
¡  Answer:	
  51	...
¡  AOL	
  series:	
  Almost	
  a	
  year	
  into	
  it	
  
¡  Had	
  hundreds	
  of	
  confidential	
  documents	
  
¡  ...
¡ Ask	
  the	
  same	
  question	
  five	
  times.	
  
¡ But	
  in	
  different	
  ways	
  
¡ At	
  different	
  times	
  ...
¡  When	
  to	
  use	
  the	
  
notebook	
  
	
  
¡  Versus	
  
¡  When	
  not	
  to	
  use	
  the	
  
notebook	
  
¡ ...
¡  During	
  the	
  interview,	
  you	
  need	
  to	
  think	
  about	
  
several	
  things	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time:...
¡  When	
  people	
  say	
  you	
  
got	
  it	
  wrong,	
  that	
  you	
  
made	
  a	
  mistake,	
  check	
  it	
  
out	
...
¡  Take	
  chances	
  
§  Bridgestone/Firestone	
  
¡  Don’t	
  take	
  no	
  for	
  an	
  
answer	
  
§  Surgeon	
  G...
¡  When	
  starting	
  a	
  
new	
  investigative	
  
business	
  story,	
  
where	
  do	
  you	
  
begin?	
  
¡  The	
 ...
¡  At	
  their	
  homes	
  
¡  After	
  hours	
  
¡  On	
  weekends	
  
¡  Away	
  from	
  places	
  
where	
  they	
 ...
¡  Yes,	
  they	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  bit	
  
odd.	
  
¡  But	
  they	
  often	
  know	
  
their	
  stuff	
  because	
  
t...
Example:	
  
Anonymous	
  	
  
tipster:	
  	
  
“How	
  did	
  you	
  find	
  
me?”	
  
¡  No	
  secret	
  
¡  It	
  takes	
  time	
  
¡  Trust	
  
¡  Willingness	
  to	
  protect	
  sources	
  
¡  Are	
  ...
¡  Exchange	
  of	
  information	
  
¡  Once	
  you	
  have	
  information	
  they	
  want,	
  then	
  
you	
  become	
 ...
¡  Define	
  the	
  terms.	
  
¡  Explain	
  why	
  it’s	
  important	
  to	
  go	
  on	
  the	
  record	
  
¡  Move	
  ...
¡  Reading	
  back	
  quotes?	
  
	
  
¡  Showing	
  stories	
  pre-­‐publication	
  
¡  Do	
  we	
  let	
  sources	
  go?	
  Do	
  we	
  let	
  them	
  change	
  
their	
  minds?	
  
¡  My	
  opinion:	
  L...
¡  No	
  surprises	
  
¡  Always	
  let	
  them	
  know	
  what’s	
  going	
  on,	
  even	
  
if	
  it	
  works	
  again...
¡  Repeatedly	
  
¡  A	
  Woodward	
  technique	
  
¡  You	
  need	
  to	
  know	
  when	
  you	
  can	
  trust	
  your...
¡ Please	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  contact	
  me	
  at	
  
alecklein@gmail.com.	
  
	
  
Investigative Business Journalism - Developing and Interviewing Sources by Alec Klein
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Investigative Business Journalism - Developing and Interviewing Sources by Alec Klein

612 views

Published on

Alec Klein, an award-winning investigative journalist and Northwestern University professor, presents tips for finding and interviewing sources throughout investigative projects during the free, full-day workshop, "Finding Your Best Investigative Business Story."

This training event was hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and the the SPJ Madison Pro Chapter at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sept. 28, 2013.

For more information about free training for business journalists, please visit http://businessjournalism.org.

For more tips on how to develop investigative business journalism stories, please visit http://bit.ly/investigativebiz2013.

Published in: Career, News & Politics, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
612
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Investigative Business Journalism - Developing and Interviewing Sources by Alec Klein

  1. 1. Presented  by   Alec  Klein   Professor,  Medill  School  of  Journalism   Northwestern  University   Madison,  Wis.,  Sept.28,  2013   How  to  get  people  to  open  up  
  2. 2. ¡  I  was  accused  of  being  like  this.   ¡  We’re  supposed  to  not  know.   ¡  Have  them  condescend  to  you.   ¡  “Treat  me  like  a  fifth  grader.”   ¡  Don’t  have  an  ego  about  this.   ¡  Need  to  be  absolutely  sure  to  write  authoritatively  
  3. 3. ¡  New  at  WSJ   ¡  Ordered  to  write  lead  news  story   ¡  IBM   ¡  Earnings   ¡  Sweat   ¡  Call  analyst:  What’s  P&L?   ¡  Cancel  subscription  
  4. 4. ¡  You  may  know  the  answer  already.   ¡  To  wit:  How  old  are  you?   ¡  Answer:  51   ¡  Thought  52   ¡  Yeah,  actually  52   ¡  If  small  lie,  is  there  a  bigger  lie?  
  5. 5. ¡  AOL  series:  Almost  a  year  into  it   ¡  Had  hundreds  of  confidential  documents   ¡  Had  well-­‐placed  sources   ¡  Editor  called  me  into  his    office.   ¡  Mused:  Wouldn’t  it  be  nice  …   ¡  Vice  president  of  finance  
  6. 6. ¡ Ask  the  same  question  five  times.   ¡ But  in  different  ways   ¡ At  different  times   ¡ To  wit:  Do  you  know  a  vice   president-­‐level  finance  guy  who  had   raised  questions  about  AOL’s   finances?  
  7. 7. ¡  When  to  use  the   notebook     ¡  Versus   ¡  When  not  to  use  the   notebook   ¡  When  to  tape  record  vs.   ¡  When  not  to  tape  record   §  Billionaire:  I  want  to  be   able  to  deny  I  had  this   conversation.  
  8. 8. ¡  During  the  interview,  you  need  to  think  about   several  things  at  the  same  time:   §  The  lede   §  The  images  to  capture   §  The  details  to  portray   §  Is  this  the  first  of  many  interviews  or  a  one-­‐shot  deal?   §  Why,  why,  why?   §  The  cosmic  point   §  Follow-­‐up  questions  
  9. 9. ¡  When  people  say  you   got  it  wrong,  that  you   made  a  mistake,  check  it   out  thoroughly.   ¡  Sometimes,  it  can  help   ¡  Red  Hat   ¡  The  Reluctant   Interviewee   ¡  What  do  you  do  when   they  won’t  talk?   ¡  Options:   §  Call   §  Email   §  Letter   §  Certified  letter:  know  they   got  it,  but  act  of  war?   §  Intermediary:  someone   they  know  
  10. 10. ¡  Take  chances   §  Bridgestone/Firestone   ¡  Don’t  take  no  for  an   answer   §  Surgeon  General   ¡  Go  there   §  Gettysburg   ¡  Last  Words  of  Advice   ¡  Bob  Woodward   §  Show  up  early   ¡  Me   §  Show  up  late  
  11. 11. ¡  When  starting  a   new  investigative   business  story,   where  do  you   begin?   ¡  The  onion:  otherwise   known  as  the  circling   effect   ¡  Begin  on  the  outside,  work  your   way  in:   §  Family   §  Friends   §  Friends  of  friends   §  Customers   §  Suppliers   §  Competitors   §  Unions   §  Associations   §  Former  employees   §  Current  employees   §  Secretaries   §  Executives  
  12. 12. ¡  At  their  homes   ¡  After  hours   ¡  On  weekends   ¡  Away  from  places   where  they  are   monitored  or   overheard   §  At  bars   §  Restaurants   §  Bowling  alleys   ¡  Places  Where  People   Network:   §  Conventions   §  Industry  gatherings   §  Trade  shows   ▪  Exchange  business  cards   ▪  Socialize   ▪  Network  
  13. 13. ¡  Yes,  they  can  be  a  bit   odd.   ¡  But  they  often  know   their  stuff  because   they  have  no  other  life.   ¡  Don’t  dismiss  the  PR   people.   ¡  Example:  secret   bonuses   ¡  But  also:  AT&T  cable   assets   §  “You  didn’t  ask  the   right  question.”   Image  by  flickr  user  Meg  Marco  
  14. 14. Example:   Anonymous     tipster:     “How  did  you  find   me?”  
  15. 15. ¡  No  secret   ¡  It  takes  time   ¡  Trust   ¡  Willingness  to  protect  sources   ¡  Are  you  willing  to  go  to  jail  for  them?  
  16. 16. ¡  Exchange  of  information   ¡  Once  you  have  information  they  want,  then   you  become  valuable.   ¡  You  have  something  to  barter.   ¡  As  long  as  it’s  not  confidential  information  
  17. 17. ¡  Define  the  terms.   ¡  Explain  why  it’s  important  to  go  on  the  record   ¡  Move  sources  up  the  ladder   §  Off  the  record   §  On  background   §  On  the  record   ¡  Sometimes,  refuse  to  go  off  the  record:  why?   §  It  can  tie  your  hands.    
  18. 18. ¡  Reading  back  quotes?     ¡  Showing  stories  pre-­‐publication  
  19. 19. ¡  Do  we  let  sources  go?  Do  we  let  them  change   their  minds?   ¡  My  opinion:  Let  sources  go.   ¡  Example:  AOL    
  20. 20. ¡  No  surprises   ¡  Always  let  them  know  what’s  going  on,  even   if  it  works  against  you.   ¡  Better  for  them  to  be  angry  at  you  before   publication  than  after,  when  it’s  too  late   ¡  AOL   §  21-­‐page,  single-­‐spaced  letter   ¡  Credit  raters   §  Removed  lede  anecdote  even  though  information   obtained  independently  
  21. 21. ¡  Repeatedly   ¡  A  Woodward  technique   ¡  You  need  to  know  when  you  can  trust  your   sources.   ¡  Example:  whether  FTC  would  approve  AOL-­‐Time   Warner  merger   §  Origins:  Editor:  Woodward  was  a  new  reporter,  too.   §  FTC  threatens  pre-­‐publication:  Last  story  you’ll  write   §  Sources  at  the  heart  of  the  secret  
  22. 22. ¡ Please  feel  free  to  contact  me  at   alecklein@gmail.com.    

×