(PSMMC)  Towards safe usage ofiodinated contrast medium         Dr/Ahmed Bahnassy        Consultant Radiologist  Prince Su...
PHARMACOLOGY OF            CONTRAST AGENTS• All intravascular iodinated contrast agents are  based on a tri-iodinated benz...
Toxicity and osmolality• The toxicity of contrast agents decreases as osmolality  approaches that of serum.• Representativ...
a.Previous moderate or severe reaction      to iodinated contrast agents. There is a six fold increase in reactions to bot...
If, after considering the risks of a recurrent contrastreaction and the potential benefits of the procedure, it isdecided ...
• The premedication regimen at Prince sultan Military Medical  City is :• 1. Methylprednisolone:   – DOSE: 32 mg by mouth ...
b. Multiple allergies• A history of multiple allergies requiring medical treatment  is associated with a 3 to 5 fold incre...
Multiple allergies• Guideline• Consider performing a non-contrast study or use of alternative  imaging modalities which do...
c. Asthma• Patients with a history of asthma experience a 6 to 10  times increased risk of severe contrast reactions.Guide...
d.Renal disease• Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is usually defined  as impairment in renal function (measured by an  i...
Risk factors for CIN• Risk factors for contrast induced nephropathy include:   – • pre-existing CKD (chronic kidney diseas...
• Contrast induced nephropathy is more likely to  occur with :• large doses of contrast (greater than 125mls),• repeated d...
How to estimate ?• Serum creatinine measurement is an imperfect  tool for identifying patients with renal impairment  as t...
Stage of kidney disease
Meaning?• Patients with an eGFR >60 mL/min are at  very low risk of CIN.• The risk is low to moderate for patients  with a...
Which previous lab exams are              accepted ?• In patients with a history of renal impairment, and in those with on...
Will you do the exam?• Guideline:  – • The decision to administer iodinated contrast to a patient with    renal disease sh...
If enhanced CT is to be performed –     •Ensure the patient is well hydrated before and after the     procedure. This is b...
– • Monitor renal function 48hrs after contrast  administration.– • Communication between the radiologist and  referring d...
e. Breast Feeding• In breast-feeding women, the risks to the mother and to  her infant must be weighed against any possibl...
f. Thyroid Disease• Iodinated contrast agents contain small amounts  of free iodine.• Iodinated contrast injections do not...
Guideline:• Iodinated contrast should not be administered to  patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Patients with  Graves d...
Important note.• Free iodine from an iodinated contrast agent  causes reduced uptake of radioactive tracer in  nuclear med...
g. Phaeochromocytomas and         Paragangliomas• Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas may secrete  catecholamines and ca...
h. Pregnancy• There is no evidence that iodinated contrast agents are  teratogenic in humans. On the other hand, there is ...
i.Drugs• Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in the  treatment of Type II diabetes mellitus.• Lactic acidosis is ...
Guidelines• In diabetic patients taking metformin, notably with co-morbidities  ,and renal impairment consider the risks o...
The incidence of anaphylactoid reactionsto iodinated contrast, particularlybronchospasm, is increased in patientstaking β-...
Intravenous Access and        Contrast Administration• The patient should present by an appropriate venous  access.• The r...
Emergency Equipment• Resuscitation equipment and medications  for the treatment of complications of  contrast administrati...
Adverse Reactions•   The majority of adverse side effects are mild or moderate non-    life-threatening events that requir...
Anaphylactoidal Contrast Reactions    a. Acute contrast reactions• Acute adverse reactions to iodinated contrast  manifest...
The American College of Radiology has divided adverse reactions to contrast into :MildSigns and symptoms appear self-limit...
• Mild reactions are usually self limited and  resolve without specific treatment. Mild  reactions may be seen in up to 3%...
• Severe reactions include hypovolaemic shock,  respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, pulmonary oedema and  convulsions. Sev...
b. Delayed contrast reactions• Late adverse contrast reactions occur between  one hour and one week after intravascular  i...
c. Patients at increased risk for an    adverse reaction to iodinated contrast•   History of a previous reaction to iodina...
• The overall incidence of adverse reactions  in children is less than that in adults.  However, children also pose unique...
Drugs dosesAtropine: Parasympatholytic agent used to treat bradycardia in vasovagal reaction.          DOSE: 0.02 mg/kg IV...
Atropine: A parasympatholytic agent used to treat bradycardia that resultsfrom a vasovagal reaction (characterized by hypo...
Diphenhydramine: An antihistamine which is an H-1 receptor site blocker.In this capacity, it blocks circulating histamine ...
Epinephrine: A drug which is a basic sympathetic agonist with the  following effects:1. Alpha–Peripheral vasoconstriction2...
Nonanaphylactoid adverse effects:  Chemotoxic Reactions:• Chemotoxic side effects include neurotoxicity, cardiac  depressi...
Nonanaphylactoid:  Vasovagal Reactions:• Vagal reactions occur as a result of increased vagal  tone on the heart and blood...
Nonanaphylactoid: Idiopathic             Reactions• Other reactions, without having a chemotoxic  or vasovagal basis, can ...
Combined Reactions:• Anaphylactoid reactions and nonanaphylactoid  reactions can occur or appear to occur  simultaneously....
Extravasation Risk Factors     Certain patients are at increased risk for                   extravasation:•   Patients who...
Extravasations of IV contrast:•   In the event of an extravasation the site may be tender to    palpation, have localized ...
Compartment syndrome• The most commonly reported severe injuries  after extravasation of LOCM are compartment  syndromes.•...
In outpatient department• Outpatients who have suffered contrast media  extravasation should be released from the  radiolo...
Inform-document• All extravasation events and their  treatment should be informed to the  radiologist ,and documented in t...
References1.   RANZCR GUIDELINES FOR IODINATED CONTRAST     ADMINISTRATION - March 2009 .2.   MANUAL ON CONTRAST MEDIA VER...
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media
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Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media

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comprehensive view of how to use safely contrast media in radiology department.

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Contrast media tutorial :Towards safe usage of iodinated contrast media

  1. 1. (PSMMC) Towards safe usage ofiodinated contrast medium Dr/Ahmed Bahnassy Consultant Radiologist Prince Sultan Military Medical City.
  2. 2. PHARMACOLOGY OF CONTRAST AGENTS• All intravascular iodinated contrast agents are based on a tri-iodinated benzene ring. Three forms exist:• High-osmolar contrast media (HOCM) are the oldest agents.No longer used in RMH .• A major advance was the development of nonionic compounds. They are monomers that dissolve in water but do not dissociate. Hence, with fewer particles in solution, they are designated low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM).• The most recent class of agents is dimers that consist of a molecule with two benzene rings that does not dissociate in water (nonionic). These compounds are designated iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM).
  3. 3. Toxicity and osmolality• The toxicity of contrast agents decreases as osmolality approaches that of serum.• Representative osmolalities are (Serum: 290 mosm/kg H2O )• HOCM: Ionic monomer: diatrizoate: 1570 mosm/kg H2O• LOCM: Nonionic monomer: iohexol 240 (Omnipaque): 518 mosm/kg H2O *• LOCM: Nonionic monomer: iohexol 300 (Omnipaque): 672 mosm/kg H2O *• IOCM: Nonionic dimer: iodixanol 320 (Visipaque): 290 mosm/kg H2O *• Currently used iodinated agents are cleared almost completely by glomerular filtration. With reduced renal function, there is vicarious excretion primarily in bile and through the bowel. Circulatory half life is 1–2 hours, assuming normal renal function.
  4. 4. a.Previous moderate or severe reaction to iodinated contrast agents. There is a six fold increase in reactions to both ionic and non-ionic contrast media following a previous adverse reaction. The likelihood of a recurrent reaction has been reported to be in the order of 8% to 60%.Guideline • Evaluate the nature of any previous contrast reaction and the contrast agent used at the time of the reaction. • Consider performing a non-contrast study or use of alternative imaging modalities which do not require administration of iodinated contrast (e.g. ultrasound, MRI).
  5. 5. If, after considering the risks of a recurrent contrastreaction and the potential benefits of the procedure, it isdecided to proceed with the contrast- enhanced study -• Use a non-ionic contrast agent• Use a different, non-ionic low or iso-osmolar agent to that previously used. Maintain close medical supervision• Leave the cannula in place and keep the patient under observation for 30 minutes after contrast administration• Ensure emergency drugs and equipment for resuscitation are readily available• Be prepared to treat any adverse reaction promptly.• Consider use of premedication
  6. 6. • The premedication regimen at Prince sultan Military Medical City is :• 1. Methylprednisolone: – DOSE: 32 mg by mouth 12 and 2 hours before contrast.•• 2. Diphenhydramine• DOSE:• a. 50 mg IM or PO 1 hour before contrast, OR • b. 50 mg (or 25 mg per height/weight indication) IV 15–20 minutes before contrast.• Note: Patients may not drive or operate heavy machinery for 4–6 hours after receiving diphenhydramine.• In addition, these patients should receive nonionic contrast agents.
  7. 7. b. Multiple allergies• A history of multiple allergies requiring medical treatment is associated with a 3 to 5 fold increase in the risk of an acute reaction to iodinated contrast. Most such reactions are mild.• Shellfish allergy is not associated with an increased risk of adverse reaction to intravenous iodinated contrast agents, over and above the 3-fold increased risk associated with other food allergies.• Skin irritation or “allergy” to topical iodine antiseptic solutions is not associated with an increased risk of adverse reaction to intravenous iodinated contrast.
  8. 8. Multiple allergies• Guideline• Consider performing a non-contrast study or use of alternative imaging modalities which do not require administration of iodinated contrast (e.g. ultrasound, MRI).• If, after considering the risks of a contrast reaction and the potential benefits of the procedure, it is decided to proceed with the contrast enhanced study - – • Use a non-ionic low or iso-osmolar contrast agent. – • Maintain close medical supervision – • Leave the cannula in place and keep the patient under observation for 30 minutes after contrast administration – • Ensure emergency drugs and equipment for resuscitation are readily available – • Be prepared to treat any adverse reaction promptly. – • Consider premedication protocol .
  9. 9. c. Asthma• Patients with a history of asthma experience a 6 to 10 times increased risk of severe contrast reactions.Guideline• If, after considering the risks of a contrast reaction and the potential benefits of the procedure, it is decided to proceed with the contrast enhanced study: – • Use a non-ionic low or iso-osmolar contrast agent. – • Maintain close medical supervision – • Leave the cannula in place and keep the patient under observation for 30 minutes after contrast administration – • Ensure emergency drugs and equipment for resuscitation are readily available – • Be prepared to treat any adverse reaction promptly.
  10. 10. d.Renal disease• Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is usually defined as impairment in renal function (measured by an increase in serum creatinine of more than 25%) occurring within 3 days following intravascular administration of a contrast agent, in the absence of an alternative etiology. In most patients with CIN, renal impairment is maximal 3 days following contrast administration, and spontaneously recovers over a period of 14 days.• A few patients progress to established renal failure and dialysis dependence (this proportion is much higher in those with multiple pre-existing risk factors and/or severe renal impairment).
  11. 11. Risk factors for CIN• Risk factors for contrast induced nephropathy include: – • pre-existing CKD (chronic kidney disease), particularly secondary to diabetic nephropathy – • dehydration – • sepsis or hypotension – • cardiovascular disease (including congestive heart failure, hypertension) – • age over 60 years (18 % of patients > age 60 have GFR < 60) – • nephrotoxic drugs (e.g. aminoglycosides, loop diuretics, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II antagonists, NSAIDS, cyclosporine and cisplatin etc) – • organ transplantation, chemotherapy – • multiple myeloma, proteinuria, hyperuricaemia
  12. 12. • Contrast induced nephropathy is more likely to occur with :• large doses of contrast (greater than 125mls),• repeated doses within 72 hours (look for previous exams),• high osmolality agents (may be with previous exams outside RMH),• and with intra-arterial (rather than intravenous) administration.
  13. 13. How to estimate ?• Serum creatinine measurement is an imperfect tool for identifying patients with renal impairment as the level of serum creatinine is dependent on muscle mass and is not normally raised until the glomerular filtration rate has fallen by more than 50%.• Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is a better measure of renal function as it takes into account patient age and sex.
  14. 14. Stage of kidney disease
  15. 15. Meaning?• Patients with an eGFR >60 mL/min are at very low risk of CIN.• The risk is low to moderate for patients with an eGFR between 30–60 mL/min• and is greatest for patients with an eGFR < 30mL/min.• Patients with an eGFR < 15 have end- stage renal failure and are usually on dialysis.
  16. 16. Which previous lab exams are accepted ?• In patients with a history of renal impairment, and in those with one or more risk factors, a recent eGFR measurement is recommended.• This should be obtained - – • within the previous 3 months in stable outpatients – • within the previous 7 days in inpatients with stable renal function – • In patients where the serum creatinine is rising, GFR cannot be estimated from a serum creatinine level and nephrology advice should be sought regarding assessment and management prior to contrast administration.• • A recent eGFR measurement is also recommended within the previous 7 days for examinations requiring intra-arterial contrast administration or high volumes (greater than 125mls) of contrast.
  17. 17. Will you do the exam?• Guideline: – • The decision to administer iodinated contrast to a patient with renal disease should be made in consultation with the patient’s referring doctor or renal physician. – • For patients in stage 3 CKD (eGFR 30-60mL/min), consider performing a noncontrast study or use of alternative imaging modalities which do not require administration of iodinated contrast (e.g. ultrasound, MRI). – • For patients in stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15-29mL/min), consider ultrasound as a noncontrast –requiring imaging modality. MR may also be appropriate provided the guidelines for MR use in advanced CKD are adhered to in order to minimize the risk of the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis
  18. 18. If enhanced CT is to be performed – •Ensure the patient is well hydrated before and after the procedure. This is best achieved in high risk patients with intravenous fluids (e.g. normal saline infusion at 1ml/kg body weight/hr or 100 mls/hour for 6 hours pre and post- procedure).Oral fluid loading of 1 litre pre-procedure is appropriate in lower risk outpatients. Those with cardiac failure and those on dialysis should not receive fluid loading. – • Nephrotoxic medications should be discontinued 48 hours prior to the study. – • Use the smallest volume of contrast possible while still maintaining diagnostic image quality. – Avoid repeat contrast injections within 72 hours. – • Use iso-osmolar or low-osmolar contrast. • For intravenous injections, there is currently no convincing evidence of lower risk with iso-osmolar agents, compared to low-osmolar agents. • For intra-arterial injection in high-risk patients, iso- osmolar agents appear to carry a lower risk than some low- osmolar agents.
  19. 19. – • Monitor renal function 48hrs after contrast administration.– • Communication between the radiologist and referring doctor, or the patient’s general practitioner, is recommended to assist with management of fluid loading, withholding of nephrotoxic drugs prior to contrast administration and to arrange reassessment of renal function 48 hours following contrast administration– • Consider consulting renal physician, particularly for patients with eGFR < 30 mL/min.– • Consider use of N-acetylcysteine with the concerned nephrologist .
  20. 20. e. Breast Feeding• In breast-feeding women, the risks to the mother and to her infant must be weighed against any possible benefits. If an iodinated contrast agent is administered, the infant is likely to receive a very small amount orally and then absorb only a very small percentage of this. There is no evidence of iodinated contrast agent induced toxicity in newborns. On the other hand, there is limited information confirming the safety of these medications in infants. – Guideline: – If iodinated contrast must be administered to a patient who is breast-feeding, there is no need for special precautions or cessation of breastfeeding
  21. 21. f. Thyroid Disease• Iodinated contrast agents contain small amounts of free iodine.• Iodinated contrast injections do not have a significant effect in patients with normal thyroid function.• Iodinated contrast induced thyrotoxicosis is rare, but may occur in patients with Graves’ disease or multinodular goiter with autonomous nodules. This typically manifests within 3 to 8 weeks after contrast administration
  22. 22. Guideline:• Iodinated contrast should not be administered to patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves disease and multinodular goiter are at increased risk of developing thyrotoxicosis following iodinated contrast injection and should be warned regarding this possibility. Thyroid function should be monitored in this group by the patient’s medical practitioner or endocrinologist.
  23. 23. Important note.• Free iodine from an iodinated contrast agent causes reduced uptake of radioactive tracer in nuclear medicine thyroid isotope studies therefore Diagnostic thyroid isotope studies should be avoided within 8 weeks after an injection of iodinated contrast.• Patients with suspected or known thyroid carcinoma should not receive iodinated contrast media if therapeutic radioactive iodine treatment is planned, because this may delay treatment with radioactive iodine for up to 8 weeks
  24. 24. g. Phaeochromocytomas and Paragangliomas• Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas may secrete catecholamines and can induce life threatening episodes of hypertension.• Intravenous non-ionic iodinated contrast has not been demonstrated to produce a significant elevation in catecholamine levels in comparison to injection of normal saline.• While it may be prudent to administer oral alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in patients with a biochemically proved pheochromocytoma to control symptoms and to prevent a spontaneous adrenergic crisis, specific blockade is not required prior to administration of iodinated contrast.
  25. 25. h. Pregnancy• There is no evidence that iodinated contrast agents are teratogenic in humans. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence to conclude that they are entirely safe. It is therefore wise to avoid administering iodinated contrast agent to women who are pregnant (particularly in the first trimester).• It is appropriate, however, to use contrast agents when the procedure requiring them is considered to be essential and the diagnostic information obtained from the study will have substantial impact on the management of the patient and foetus during the pregnancy. The risks, as always, must be balanced against the possible benefits.
  26. 26. i.Drugs• Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in the treatment of Type II diabetes mellitus.• Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious metabolic complication -fatal in approximately 50% of cases- which can occur due to metformin accumulation in patients with renal impairment.• The risk of lactic acidosis increases with the degree of renal dysfunction and the patients age.• Patients receiving intravascular iodinated contrast may experience an acute deterioration in renal function leading to metformin accumulation and potential lactic acidosis.
  27. 27. Guidelines• In diabetic patients taking metformin, notably with co-morbidities ,and renal impairment consider the risks of lactic acidosis and the potential benefits of the procedure.• Metformin should be withheld for at least 48hrs commencing on the day of the contrast study. Renal function should be reassessed before recommencing Metformin.• Stop any concomitant nephrotoxic drugs (NSAID,gentamycin ).
  28. 28. The incidence of anaphylactoid reactionsto iodinated contrast, particularlybronchospasm, is increased in patientstaking β-blockers.These reactions may also be more difficultto treat .
  29. 29. Intravenous Access and Contrast Administration• The patient should present by an appropriate venous access.• The radiologist responsible must be available to attend to the patient in the event of an emergency or complication of contrast injection.• A patient should not be left alone or unsupervised in the first ten minutes after injection of the iodinated contrast agent.• It is advisable that the patient remains on the premises for at least 15 minutes after iodinated contrast administration as most severe reactions occur within this time period. This should be increased to 30 minutes in patients at increased risk of a reaction.
  30. 30. Emergency Equipment• Resuscitation equipment and medications for the treatment of complications of contrast administration shall be available.• The RT in charge of CT and fluoroscopy should check regularly with the assigned nurse the readiness of these medications .
  31. 31. Adverse Reactions• The majority of adverse side effects are mild or moderate non- life-threatening events that require only observation, reassurance, and support.• Most severe adverse side effects have a mild or moderate beginning.• Virtually all life-threatening reactions occur immediately or within the first 20 minutes after contrast material injection.Types of reactions: 1. Anaphylactoid 2. Nonanaphylactoid a. chemotoxic b.vasovagal c. idiopathic 3. Combined (1 and 2)
  32. 32. Anaphylactoidal Contrast Reactions a. Acute contrast reactions• Acute adverse reactions to iodinated contrast manifest within 60 minutes of injection .• The majority of acute, non-renal, adverse contrast reactions are thought to be idiosyncratic (anaphalactoid) or “pseudoallergic”. They are not dose dependant and do not involve antibodies to contrast media.• Histamine release, along with other active biological mediators such as serotonin, prostaglandins, bradykinin, leukotrienes, adenosine and endothelin has been implicated.
  33. 33. The American College of Radiology has divided adverse reactions to contrast into :MildSigns and symptoms appear self-limited without evidence of progressionNausea, vomiting Altered taste SweatsCough Itching Rash, hivesWarmth (heat) Pallor Nasal stuffinessHeadache Flushing Swelling: eyes, faceDizziness Chills AnxietyShakingTreatment: Observation and reassurance. Usually no intervention or medication is required; however, these reactions may progress into a more severe category.ModerateReactions which require treatment but are not immediately life-threateningTachycardia/bradycardia Hypotension Bronchospasm, wheezingHypertension Dyspnea Laryngeal edemaPronounced cutaneous Pulmonary edemareactionTreatment: Prompt treatment with close observationSevereLife-threatening with more severe signs or symptoms including:Laryngeal edema Profound hypotension Unresponsiveness(severe or progressive) Convulsions Cardiopulmonary arrestClinically manifest arrhythmiasTreatment: Immediate treatment. Usually requires hospitalization.
  34. 34. • Mild reactions are usually self limited and resolve without specific treatment. Mild reactions may be seen in up to 3% of patients after non-ionic low-osmolality contrast agent administration.• Moderate reactions include severe vomiting, marked urticaria, bronchospasm, facial/laryngeal oedema and vasovagal attacks.
  35. 35. • Severe reactions include hypovolaemic shock, respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, pulmonary oedema and convulsions. Severe reactions are uncommon, occurring in 0.04% to 0.004% of non-ionic low osmolar iodinated contrast injections. (i.e. 1 in 2,500 to 1 in 25,000 contrast injections). The risk of death is rare (1 in 170,000).• The current non-ionic, low osmolar iodinated contrast agents are in the order of 5 to 10 times safer, in terms of mild to moderate reactions, than the older, high osmolar ionic agents. There is not sufficient data available to assess the relative risk of severe reactions.
  36. 36. b. Delayed contrast reactions• Late adverse contrast reactions occur between one hour and one week after intravascular iodinated contrast administration. These are typically skin reactions with a maculopapular rash being most common. Less frequent skin reactions include angioedema, urticaria and erythema. Delayed contrast reactions are not associated with bronchospasm or laryngeal oedema.• The incidence of reported late adverse reactions is likely to be 4% or less.
  37. 37. c. Patients at increased risk for an adverse reaction to iodinated contrast• History of a previous reaction to iodinated contrast agents or history of allergy• History of asthma History of renal disease or conditions predisposing to renal impairment such as: − Previous renal surgery − Diabetes Mellitus − Proteinuria − Hypertension − Gout − Recent nephrotoxic drugs (eg. Aminoglycosides, NSAIDs, etc) − Dehydration, Cardiac Failure • Current drugs which may cause adverse reactions in association with iodinated contrast: − Metformin − Β-adrenergic blockers • Other medical conditions which are associated with adverse reactions to iodinated contrast − Hyperthyroidism − Sickle cell disease (homozygous) may develop crisis although the risk is very low with nonionic contrast. − Myasthenia Gravis symptoms may be worsened with ionic contrast but the risk with nonionic contrast is thought to be low.
  38. 38. • The overall incidence of adverse reactions in children is less than that in adults. However, children also pose unique problems due to their small size.• It is important to be familiar with pediatric dose regimens.• Please note that epinephrine is often administered to children by the subcutaneous route.
  39. 39. Drugs dosesAtropine: Parasympatholytic agent used to treat bradycardia in vasovagal reaction. DOSE: 0.02 mg/kg IV Maximum dose = 1 mg Minimum dose = 0.1 mgDiphenhydramine: Used for treatment of urticaria DOSE: 1 mg/kg IV per doseEpinephrine: Used to treat laryngeal edema, severe urticaria or facial edema,and if needed for bronchospasm. DOSE: Subcutaneous: 0.01 mg/kg/dose (0.01 mL/kg) Maximum dose = 0.5 mL IMPORTANT: Do NOT use the 1:1000 strength for IV injection.
  40. 40. Atropine: A parasympatholytic agent used to treat bradycardia that resultsfrom a vasovagal reaction (characterized by hypotension and bradycardia).The minimum adult dose is 0.6 mg,since a smaller amount can have a paradoxical reverse effect. DOSE: 0.6–1.0 mg IV slowly Maximum dose = 2 mg
  41. 41. Diphenhydramine: An antihistamine which is an H-1 receptor site blocker.In this capacity, it blocks circulating histamine from binding to target cells.It does not counteract histamine-mediated reactions that have already begun.Therefore, it should be used only to treat mild urticaria,and where it is deemed desirable to provide symptomatic relief by preventing further reactions.Diphenhydramine should not be used for severe urticariaor other more significant reactions. DOSE: 25–50 mg IV or IM Caution: Causes drowsiness. Patient should not drive or operate machinery for 4-6 hours. 10
  42. 42. Epinephrine: A drug which is a basic sympathetic agonist with the following effects:1. Alpha–Peripheral vasoconstriction2. Beta-1–Cardiac: increase contractility and heart rate (chronotropic, inotropic)3. Beta-2–Bronchodilatation (bronchioles) As an alpha agonist, epinephrine is used to treat severe urticaria, facial edema, and laryngeal edema. As a beta-2 agonist, it may be needed to treat bronchospasm. Epinephrine is supplied in two strengths: 1:1,000 in 1 mL vials for subcutaneous use, and 1:10,000 in 10 mL prefilled syringes for intravenous use. In each case, 1 mg of epinephrine is supplied. DOSE: Subcutaneous: 1:1,000 (1 mg/mL) 0.1–0.3 mL (0.1 – 0.3 mg) DOSE: Intravenous: 1:10,000 (0.1 mg/mL) 1 mL IV slowly every 3–5 minutes May repeat up to 1 mg maximumIMPORTANT: Do NOT use the 1:1000 strength for IV injection.
  43. 43. Nonanaphylactoid adverse effects: Chemotoxic Reactions:• Chemotoxic side effects include neurotoxicity, cardiac depression, arrhythmia, electrocardiogram changes, and renal tubular or vascular injury.• Some chemotoxic side effects appear to relate to the ionic nature and content of contrast media that dissolved in solution. Nonionic contrast media are associated with fewer chemotoxic side effects.
  44. 44. Nonanaphylactoid: Vasovagal Reactions:• Vagal reactions occur as a result of increased vagal tone on the heart and blood vessels. The result is bradycardia and decreased blood pressure and may be accompanied by apprehension, confusion, sweating, unresponsiveness, and loss of bowel or bladder control signals.• Some vagal reactions may not be caused by the contrast media but instead may be the result of coincident events related to the examination (e.g., needle puncture, or abdominal compression).
  45. 45. Nonanaphylactoid: Idiopathic Reactions• Other reactions, without having a chemotoxic or vasovagal basis, can occur. When these reactions are encountered, the underlying pathophysiology cannot be defined.
  46. 46. Combined Reactions:• Anaphylactoid reactions and nonanaphylactoid reactions can occur or appear to occur simultaneously. The end result may be a complex, life-threatening situation with a patient in shock.• Careful attention to the specific signs and symptoms of a reaction should help in identifying the exact causes of the reaction.• A careful history of any medications ingested prior to the exam can aid in identifying possible contributory effects of the medications.
  47. 47. Extravasation Risk Factors Certain patients are at increased risk for extravasation:• Patients who cannot communicate adequately• The elderly• Infants and children• Patients with altered consciousness• Severely ill or debilitated patients• Patients with abnormal circulation in the limb to be injected
  48. 48. Extravasations of IV contrast:• In the event of an extravasation the site may be tender to palpation, have localized edema and erythema, treatment can be depending on the physician preference warm or cold compresses and to elevate the affected extremity above heart level to decrease capillary hydrostatic pressure and promote resorption of the fluid.• Surgical consultation should be considered when:* In extravasations where 100 ml or more of LOCM ( low osmolality contrast media) or 60 ml if in the wrist ankle or hand.
  49. 49. Compartment syndrome• The most commonly reported severe injuries after extravasation of LOCM are compartment syndromes.• compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency, more likely to occur after extravasation of larger volumes of contrast media; however, it also has been observed after extravasation of relatively small volumes, especially when this occurs in less capacious areas (such as over the ventral or dorsal surfaces of the wrist). •Avoid access sites in the hand wrist, foot and ankle if possible.
  50. 50. In outpatient department• Outpatients who have suffered contrast media extravasation should be released from the radiology department only after the radiologist is satisfied that any signs and symptoms that were present initially have improved or that new symptoms have not developed during the observation period.• Clear instructions should be given to the patient to seek additional medical care, should there be any worsening of symptoms, skin ulceration, or the development of any neurologic or circulatory symptoms, including paresthesias.
  51. 51. Inform-document• All extravasation events and their treatment should be informed to the radiologist ,and documented in the medical record, especially in the dictated imaging report of the obtained study.• The referring physician should be notified through his bleep number.
  52. 52. References1. RANZCR GUIDELINES FOR IODINATED CONTRAST ADMINISTRATION - March 2009 .2. MANUAL ON CONTRAST MEDIA VERSION 6 2008 –ACR3. CONTRAST MEDIA TUTORIAL :Jessica B. Robbins, MD ,Myron A. Pozniak, MD University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI . 2010 .4. Adverse reactions to intravenous iodinated contrast media:a primer for radiologists. Saravanan Namasivayam . Mannudeep K. Kalra .William E. Torres . William C. Small. Emerg Radiol (2006) 12: 210–215.5. JCI standards 4th edition.6. Radiology Review Manual.5th edition Wolfgang Dahnert.LWW

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