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Clutterbuc Kjan2011
 

Clutterbuc Kjan2011

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Slides from the David Clutterbuck presentation at WSEH on 10 January 11.

Slides from the David Clutterbuck presentation at WSEH on 10 January 11.

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    Clutterbuc Kjan2011 Clutterbuc Kjan2011 Presentation Transcript

    • Measuring the Effectiveness of Mentoring Professor David Clutterbuck and Lis Merrick
    • The RoI of Coaching & Mentoring How HR can achieve greatest value from investment in coaching & mentoring Professor David Clutterbuck
    • What issues do you need to address with regard to Coaching RoI, and why? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • The coaching spectrum Line manager coaching Off-line internal skills and behavioural coaching Internally resourced executive coaching Externally resourced executive coaching Mentoring © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • How does responsibility for developing talent divide out between: Line manager? HR? Sponsor? Mentor? The learner ? Discussion: How clearly do people in your organisation understand their own and other players’ responsibilities? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Problems measuring RoI in coaching Problems in measurement include: Short-term v long-term outcomes may conflict Goals are often emergent, not fixed at the beginning Easy fixes are the most easily measurable, but typically the least important in terms of value Client self-assessment is not a reliable measure © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Some elements of VFM Change is acknowledged and sustained Change affects more than just the client, but those they work with (i.e. it’s systemic) Cost is related to impact on the business Coaches’ relative competence is related to the level at which they operate © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Measuring the effectiveness of Line Manager coaching © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • What drivers and impediments do you see for line manager coaching in your organization? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Like a dance, effective coaching requires the active, informed cooperation of at least two people. Training a line manager as a coach and expecting the team to pick it up as they go is like a tango, where only one of the partners knows the steps! © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Elements of a systemic approach to coaching within the team Everyone learns at least the basics of coaching Everyone learns how to be coached Learning about coaching takes place over time, with opportunities to experiment and practise There is a positive psychological contract Everyone may be coached by anyone (including the leader/manager) There is ample time for reflection together © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Measuring line manager coaching Coaching behaviours of line manager Coaching behaviours of coachee/team member Relationship quality Broad individual outcomes: performance, learning, enabling, emotional Skinny individual outcomes: specific skills or behaviours Outcomes for other stakeholders: the team and other colleagues © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Measurement: coaching Process Performance Organisation system Team System Individual © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Assessing external executive coaches © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • How do you know how the executive coaches you use compare to “world class” coaches? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Why assess executive coaches? Coaching qualifications are not reliable indicators of competence and “fit”, in general Coach provider organisations cannot guarantee the suitability of all their coach pool Client feedback is not a reliable indicator of coach performance The coaching market is evolving rapidly – someone considered an effective, leading edge coach three years ago may be considered mediocre today, unless they have invested heavily in CPD © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Why an assessment centre? Assesses coaches from several perspectives (what they do, what they say, how they think) Provides a consistent benchmark, against which to compare candidate coaches Indicates that the organization is serious about the quality of the executive coaches it hires Educates people in the business about what to expect from good coaching Overcomes ad hoc hiring of “man in the bar” Enables HR to set bands of coaching capability and fees Major cost savings, both immediate and long term © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • What makes an effective assessment centre? Clarity of the competences to be assessed Multiple perspectives on each competence Assessors are trained to ensure consistency of scoring Participants are clear about the purpose of each activity and what is being assessed Assessors have sufficient time between activities to reflect and confer Volunteers are briefed thoroughly about their role Confidentiality and participant safety Participant reflection is taken into account in the overall assessment Feedback to participants © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • The key elements of a coach assessment centre Robust application process to identify suitable candidates Helping selected coaches prepare Psychological interview, to identify relevant personality and or other dysfunctions, which may cause concern Panel interview, to assess knowledge, CPD, ethicality, use of supervision, “organisational fit” and other aspects of practice “Real play” using executive volunteers Reflections by coachee Reflections by coach Feedback to coach © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Some critical questions How do we ensure the appropriate level of applicants? What do we do with existing executive coaches? What experienced resources (coaches, coaching psychologists etc) do we have in-house and what do we need to buy in? How will we manage the politics (internal and external)? What is our communication plan (internally and externally)? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Where coaches most often fail to perform Use of supervision Managing boundaries Relevance and depth of CPD Commercial awareness – linking issues with the business context Defining their personal philosophy of coaching Over-dependence on simplistic models (e.g. GROW) Too narrow a portfolio of coaching approaches © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • After the assessment centre Ranking the candidates Feedback to participants Induction of accredited pool Long-term supervision and development of the pool Internal communications Coach promotion © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Some lessons we’ve learned Don’t over-promise on the amount of feedback Maintain broad support from both HR and the line Have a process to ensure the safety of volunteers, who experience poor or dangerous coaching Professional organisations can be highly supportive and helpful Calibrate frequently © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • What have we achieved? Removed poor and dangerous coaches Increased confidence of HR and the line in the quality of coaching provision Regularised executive coaching fees into bands according to level of client and intervention Potentially, reduced the average number of coaching sessions required (to be measured after a year) Raised the profile and awareness of coaching across the organisation Stimulated coaching pool providers to vet their coaches more thoroughly and regularly Contributed to raising coaching standards generally © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Evolution of coach competence © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • What have you done/could you do to give internal coaches equal status with external? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Measuring mentoring Longitudinal measures better than single point Individual outcomes: Career, developmental, enabling and emotional Organizational outcomes: retention, job commitment Programme quality: International Standards for Mentoring Programmes in Employment © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Sustaining RoI Some of the essential ingredients include: An influential head of coaching and mentoring Continued top level backing Links to HR systems and developmental priorities (e.g. diversity) and to CSR Opportunities for continuous development of internal coaches & mentors, and levels of qualification Measurement of relationship quality and coaching/mentoring behaviours, as well as outcomes © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Measuring mentoring Longitudinal measures better than single point Individual outcomes: Career, developmental, enabling and emotional Organizational outcomes: retention, job commitment Programme quality: International Standards for Mentoring Programmes in Employment © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Sustaining RoI Some of the essential ingredients include: An influential head of coaching and mentoring Continued top level backing Links to HR systems and developmental priorities (e.g. diversity) and to CSR Opportunities for continuous development of internal coaches & mentors, and levels of qualification Measurement of relationship quality and coaching/mentoring behaviours, as well as outcomes © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • When to measure Before the programme start (Climate for mentoring + general participant expectations) At the beginning (Specific participant expectations) After 2/3 meetings (Is this a good match?) After 4-6 months (Are relationships working? What support do people need?) After 12 months (Short-term - mainly developmental - outcomes) After 24 months (Longer-term – career – outcomes)
    • 1. Individual Mentee and Mentor Development Through the organisation’s performance management system Promotion and retention figures Attitude questionnaires/360 degree feedback © Coach Mentoring Ltd 2008 11 January 2011 32
    • 2. Mentoring Relationships Number and frequency of meetings Average length of relationships Number of requests for new mentors Number of relationships with agreed contracts (if that is a voluntary process) Confidential 3rd party feedback © Coach Mentoring Ltd 2008 11 January 2011 33
    • 3. Evaluation of a Mentoring Programme Prog Level Rel Level Process Outputs
    • Final Evaluation Has the programme achieved its objectives? Have you evaluated change in skills/benefits obtained/feelings of participants/process effectiveness? How well did your process meet your needs? Return to organisation - Has it contributed to your overall development process? © Coach Mentoring Ltd 2008 11 January 2011 35
    • Validated scales Organisational context Goal clarity, commitment and alignment Mentoring behaviours (by both parties) Relationship quality Outcomes – career, developmental, enabling and emotional
    • Formal assessment: the ISMPE The International Standards for Mentoring Programmes in Employment cover: Clarity of purpose Stakeholder training and briefing Selecting and matching Measurement and review Ethics and pastoral care Support systems and administration
    • What does it mean to achieve Gold standard? Three levels of award – Bronze (85%), Silver (90%), Gold 95% + compliance Gold schemes are among the most effective and well-managed in the world It can be used as a benchmark for other programmes
    • The assessment process Programme coordinator and team review practice against the standards, and gathers initial evidence Assessor reviews the evidence and identifies areas, where improvements would increase the score Changes are made! Second assessment, with more detailed evidence and interviews with stakeholders Report is reviewed by supervisory assessor Award is made!
    • Outcomes Hard measures of mentoring effectiveness Retention Appraisal scores Increased sales/outputs Proportion of proposals based on customer value-added Employee engagement data Diversity statistics Quality improvement data Actual promotions Quality improvement data Actual promotions Process Frequency of meetings Numbers of pairs that stay the course
    • Outcomes Soft measures of mentoring effectiveness Achievement of relationship goals (as measured by mentee and mentor) Significant changes in behaviour or competence, as seen by mentee or via 360 feedback Increased self-confidence Improved work-life balance, stress etc Improved work-life balance, stress etc Process Perception of relationship quality Depth and openness of mentoring dialogue
    • Informal, ad hoc monitoring What’s going well and less well? What would you like your mentor/mentee to do more/less of? How does this relationship compare with your ideal mentoring relationship? What specifics (e.g. More frequent meetings) would make a positive difference? What additional support would be helpful?
    • Continuous improvement Measurement encourages good practice in mentoring dyads Communicate survey data to participants and sponsors – ask them to help contextualise responses and use them to initiate programme improvements Look for patterns in the data – e.g. Why do male mentees appear to be less trusting of their mentors than females? Conduct an annual programme review and make it part of your report to senior management Where appropriate, benchmark against other similar organisations
    • Discussion: How would you now respond if your CEO asked you to prove the RoI for coaching and mentoring in your organisation? © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates
    • Clutterbuck AssociatesTel: +44 (0)1628 606850Email: info@clutterbucksassociates.co.ukwww.gpcoachingandmentoring.com © 2010 Clutterbuck Associates