MARKETING MOMENTSHow Does Advertising Work?Cigarette Advertisements in the 20th CenturyKatrina Post
LUCKY STRIKE OFFICE AD FROM 1915                    Depicting the quintessential “men-                          at-work,” ...
HELMAR FLAPPERS AD FROM 1917The overt sexuality of the harem of   flappers in this Helmar Turkish       cigarettes adverti...
FATIMA AD FROM 1917                      Sensible, clean, and minimalistic:                          this advertisement fo...
“BULL” DURHAM AD FROM 1918This text-heavy advertisement is  an early precursor to the shift    to whimsical, creative copy...
CHESTERFIELD CIGARETTES AD FROM 1948                    Using male athlete celebrities                         as the char...
MARLBORO JOHNNY SAMPLE AD FROM 1960Johnny Sample, American football    star, breaks boundaries in this     advertisement a...
MARLBORO COWBOY AD FROM 1961                              As the 1960s                     progressed, advertising shifted...
NEWPORT BOLD COLD AD FROM 1970Truly a product of its time, this    advertisement capitalizes    on previously unexplored  ...
This work is licensed under the Creative CommonsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copyof this license, ...
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How Does Advertising Work?: Cigarette Advertisements in the 20th Century, by Katrina Post

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  • Roland Marchand. Advertising the American Dream: Making Way for Modernity, 1920-1940. Berkeley: University of California, 1985. Print.
  • Michael Schudson. Advertising, the Uneasy Persuasion: Its Dubious Impact on American Society. New York: Basic, 1984. Print.
  • Roland Marchand. Advertising the American Dream: Making Way for Modernity, 1920-1940. Berkeley: University of California, 1985. Print.
  • "The Art of Writing Advertising." Interview by Dennis Higgins with George Gribbin.
  • Marcel Danesi. Brands. New York: Routledge, 2006. Print.
  • Susan Strasser. Satisfaction Guaranteed: the Making of the American Mass Market. New York: Pantheon, 1989. Print.
  • "The Art of Writing Advertising." Interview by Dennis Higgins with Leo Burnett.Marcel Danesi. Brands. New York: Routledge, 2006. Print.
  • Arlene M. Dávila. Latinos, Inc.: the Marketing and Making of a People. Berkeley, CA: University of California, 2001. Print.Note: this reference was used more for context and the ways advertisers commodify minority identities, not specifically Latino identity
  • How Does Advertising Work?: Cigarette Advertisements in the 20th Century, by Katrina Post

    1. 1. MARKETING MOMENTSHow Does Advertising Work?Cigarette Advertisements in the 20th CenturyKatrina Post
    2. 2. LUCKY STRIKE OFFICE AD FROM 1915 Depicting the quintessential “men- at-work,” this Lucky Strike tobacco advertisement portrays theirs as the brand of choice for white-collar, powerful men. A perfect example of the Parable of the Democracy of Goods, the subtext of this ad suggests that by smoking Lucky Strike brand cigarettes, one can achieve social mobility and an elevated status through consumption.* This ad also reflects the contemporaneous definition of masculinity in the early 20th century: high-powered men working in a plush office space, signifying financially secure individuals.
    3. 3. HELMAR FLAPPERS AD FROM 1917The overt sexuality of the harem of flappers in this Helmar Turkish cigarettes advertisement relentlessly targets the “gentlemen” as the desired consumer. The exoticism of the product itself combined with the familiarity of the Aryan faces of the flapper women perfectly epitomizes the shift from rational styles of advertising to more emotional ones. This artistic advertisement is powerful simply because of its provocative presence and less because of its textual content.*
    4. 4. FATIMA AD FROM 1917 Sensible, clean, and minimalistic: this advertisement for Fatima Cigarettes appeals to the rational, intellectual consumer. The static portrait of the stately gentleman is a hook for the consumer to focus on the textual portion of the advertisement, selling the brand of Fatima as an aspect of the “big,” important man’s daily life. The Parable of the Democracy of Goods is expressed clearly by revealing the consumer’s desire for association with high-class men such as the one depicted here.* This ad sells the masculine man in the early 20th century as sensible and elegant.
    5. 5. “BULL” DURHAM AD FROM 1918This text-heavy advertisement is an early precursor to the shift to whimsical, creative copy that later advertisers in the 1960s championed.* The creative diction and layout of the ad connotes a conversation with the reader that engages and draws them to the idealized illustration of “gaiety.” Also, although the tobacco is described as mild, the women in the advertisement are not smoking, revealing that it is still an activity reserved for men.
    6. 6. CHESTERFIELD CIGARETTES AD FROM 1948 Using male athlete celebrities as the characters in this advertisement, Chesterfield distinguishes its cigarettes with endorsements from well- known, popular figures in society. This ad shows the collision of America’s pastime with celebrity endorsements, targeting the male demographic that still represents the biggest consumer base for cigarettes. Chesterfield brands itself by showing its association with the cultural relevance of the product.*
    7. 7. MARLBORO JOHNNY SAMPLE AD FROM 1960Johnny Sample, American football star, breaks boundaries in this advertisement as an African- American selling the manly Marlboro cigarettes. His presence in the public eye as an elite athlete is used as a prop in an advertisement that publicizes the new packaging for the cigarettes. A vestige from the turn-of-the-century, a major tactic for advertisers is selling the uniqueness of the packaging, sometimes more so than the product itself.*
    8. 8. MARLBORO COWBOY AD FROM 1961 As the 1960s progressed, advertising shifted towards creative copy with strong, romanticized characters.* Characters like the Marlboro Cowboy shown in this advertisement idealize a rugged lifestyle and induce nostalgia for simpler times. Also, the colors in the packaging itself are red, white and blue, ensconcing the Marlboro brand image in American society.** This character is synonymous with the Marlboro brand, creating a distinctive über- masculine, American brand identity.
    9. 9. NEWPORT BOLD COLD AD FROM 1970Truly a product of its time, this advertisement capitalizes on previously unexplored areas of target marketing directly to African-American smokers. Everything from the man’s afro hairstyle to the colloquial “Cool ain’t Cold” commodifies the minority African-American identity.* It illustrates a “bold,” “cool” take on masculinity; however, the starkness of the ad prevents a synesthetic experience for the viewer.
    10. 10. This work is licensed under the Creative CommonsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copyof this license, visithttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/ or send aletter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.

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