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UNSW - How we manage waste and recycling

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This is a presentation about where UNSW's waste and recycling goes.

This is a presentation about where UNSW's waste and recycling goes.

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  • Weight of all materials found on lower campus and percentage of totalMaterial type Amount (kg) Per centPaper (recyclable) 128.4 7.6%Paper (contaminated) 235.8 14.0%Cardboard 60.8 3.6%Organics (vegetation) 26.0 1.5%Organics (other) 6.8 0.4%Organics (food) 526.2 31.2%Glass 95.1 5.6%Steel (ferrous) 17.6 1.0%Aluminium (non-ferrous) 21.2 1.3%Other metal (eg. stainless steel) 2.6 0.2%Plastic film 88.8 5.3%PET # 1 42.5 2.5%HDPE # 2 19.2 1.1%Other plastics 101.9 6.0%Construction & demolition materials 5.6 0.3%Peripheral e-waste (hardware etc) 21.4 1.3%Office supplies 7.7 0.5%Containerised food or liquid 128.1 7.6%Reject (stringy, textile, oversize) 15.0 0.9%Batteries 1.6 0.1%Hazardous 0.2 0.0%Nappies 14.2 0.8%Residual 51.4 3.1%Disposable paper cups 65.9 3.9%Total material collected 1,684.0 100.0%
  • = 25 wheelie bins
  • The main Kensington campus is on a 38-hectare site and the University actively manages 65 hectares of land, including the College of Fine Arts, the Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra, research field stations at Manly Vale, Fowlers Gap and Wellington, and a sporting facility at Tarban Creek.Garden WasteAll tree pruning off-cuts are processed on site into mulch and woodchips and used back on the garden beds across the UNSW campus. UNSW applies large quantities of mulch to the landscaped environment to reduce transpiration resulting in less irrigation being used. All other lawn clippings, leaf material and garden organics are collected and transported to Veolia waste station at Botany for processing. UNSW uses organic fertilisers for the gardens, lawns and sports fields.Native Planting PolicyWhile the Kensington campus has some mature non-native trees, new plantings favour native plants and grasses indigenous to the Randwick/Kensington area over non-native plant species. UNSW’s planting policy is to promote bio-diversity. Species are also selected to provide opportunities for students and external schools to use our grounds as a source of education.IrrigationBore water is primarily used for irrigation of the grounds, but it is increasingly being used to replace potable water applications too. In 2010 UNSW updated our watering systems to improve water efficiency. We also installed extra water storage capabilities.Chemical and Fertiliser UseIn 2010, the University commenced an initiative to reduce the use of garden chemicals by applying organic based fertilisers where ever possible, and limiting future use of a range of pesticides through its grounds maintenance contract.UNSW aims to strike a balance between preventive cultural practices and reactive use of low toxicity chemical solutions as a last resort. UNSW purchases organic fertilizers wherever possible, even if these are more expensive, believing that the environmental and horticultural benefits justify the extra cost.
  • Maybe a map of UNSW with an arrow to Silverwater and then to Botany – Amcor paper.
  • More importantly this is a tonne of plastic not going into landfill.
  • More importantly this is a tonne of plastic not going into landfill.
  • Cooking oil would otherwise be wasted converted to biodiesel
  • A lot has changed institutionally, socially, economically and in our environmentSustainability needs increasingClimate changeWater scarcity and qualityEnergy conservation
  • A lot has changed institutionally, socially, economically and in our environmentSustainability needs increasingClimate changeWater scarcity and qualityEnergy conservation
  • Transcript

    • 1. What happens to our waste?ARTS 2243: Waste and Society> Recycling and Re-use at UNSWUNSW Sustainability
    • 2. What waste do we produce?Accumulative recovery reportTonnage of 27% 24%Recovered Waste Paper & cardboard Mixed containers 12% Plastic film1 month 125.2t Food & organics 33% Landfill1 year 82.2 4%
    • 3. What waste do we produce?Accumulative recovery reportTonnage of 17%Recycling Streams 33% Paper & cardboardApril198t 24% Mixed containers Plastic film 27% Food & organicsJune 121.90t Greenwaste LandfillJuly 145.06t 12% 4%
    • 4. Waste reductionDisposable coffee cups 13,520,000 39 Tonnes cups a year per year 3% of our waste!
    • 5. Waste reductionOne Simple Solution Reusable Cups Keep Cups Available from Bookshop & Arc Gift Shop
    • 6. Public place recyclingRecycling can work with your help
    • 7. Public place recyclingTwo bins:Red is for General wasteYellow is forBeverage containers
    • 8. Paper & cardboardWhat happens to our paper and cardboard?
    • 9. Paper & cardboardBlue Bins in Library + corridors Recycling 800 tonne/year UNSW makes money from recycling paper & cardboardRecycling boxesavailable fromstationary re-usecentre, ARC, FMAssist, room 224AChancellery or onrequest. Staff and student responsibilityDesk bins for recycling to empty paper into blue Recycling makes money wheelie bins
    • 10. Paper & cardboardAMCOR’s Botany Recycling PlantAll paper andcardboard isprocessed and Plastic contamination separated Fibrous film at one end, dry recycled paper out the other endrecycled within72 hours fromdelivery Final recycled product Fibrous sludge
    • 11. Batteries & mobile phones More than 800 mobile phones collected each year
    • 12. Batteries & mobile phonesMobile phones Recycled by Mobile Muster for free Where? Lower Campus: ARC Reception Upper Campus: FM Assist Mid Campus: Contact
    • 13. Batteries & mobile phonesBatteriesBatteries contain toxic andhazardous heavy metalsBattery World recyclingstation where all batteriesare recycled at expenseof UNSW
    • 14. Printer toner cartridges Successful staff volunteer initiative
    • 15. Printer toner cartridgesPlanet ArkSent to Close the Loopin MelbourneSome remanufacturedwith remainder of plasticand metal recycled
    • 16. Printer toner cartridgesCara TonerOver 5,788 reusessince UNSW service began of cartridges collected46% from UNSW are reusedA successful staff volunteer initiative
    • 17. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Reverse vending> Accept empty drink containers.> machines accept Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable.> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds empty drink between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins. containers> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 18. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Eliminates> Accept empty drink containers.> contamination = Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable. Material 100%> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending recyclable Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins.> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 19. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Reduces> Accept empty drink containers.> cleaning costs > Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable. An average bin> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending holds 100-150 Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins. containers> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 20. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Reverse Vending>> Accept empty drink containers. Machines hold Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable. 3,000 crushed> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending containers Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins.> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 21. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Users are given> Accept empty drink containers. vouchers &> Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable. prizes as> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending incentives to recycle Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins.> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 22. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory> Accept empty drink containers.> Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable. Check out…> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins.> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle. www.thefuntheory.com> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date> Expensive technology.> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking. The Fun Theory
    • 23. Reverse vending machines Reverse vending machinesThe Fun Theory Our experience to date:> Accept empty drink containers. Expensive technology> Eliminate contamination. Material 100% recyclable.> Reduces cleaning costs - An average wheelie bin holds Footprint, power & IT between 100 & 150 containers. Reverse Vending requirement limit Machines hold 3,000 crushed containers = to 25 wheelie bins. possible locations> Give users vouchers & prizes as incentives to recycle.> Check out www.thefuntheory.com.Our experience to date Networked and> Expensive technology. vulnerable to hacking> Footprint, power & IT requirement limit possible locations.> Networked and vulnerable to hacking.
    • 24. Garden waste Bore waterprimarily used for irrigation of the grounds
    • 25. Garden wasteAll tree pruning off-cuts and other greenwaste is processed on-site andmulch is used on garden beds.All other lawn clippings, leaf materialand garden organics collectedand transported to Veolia wastestation at Botany for processing.UNSW uses organic fertilisers forgardens, lawns and sports fields.
    • 26. Glass recycling Waste audit found glass is 3 rdlargest in composition of our waste
    • 27. Glass recyclingA limited but successful glass recycling stream at: The Roundhouse Bar Goldstein College New College Scientia Building The Roundouse
    • 28. Fluorescent tubes & light globes Fluorescent tubes contain enough mercury to pollute 30,000 litres of water beyond the safe drinking level
    • 29. Fluorescent tubes & light globes Chemsal Recycling and disposal by Chemsal Collect fluorescent, CFL, incandescent, halogen, High Intensity Discharge lamps (HIDs) discharge light bulbs/lamps including associated ballasts and transformers Spotless Stored in the Spotless compound on Western Campus with periodic collection by Chemsal Collected on request via FM Assist (Ext: 55111)
    • 30. Biological & hazardous waste Specialist contractors dispose of biological and hazardous chemical waste
    • 31. Biological & hazardous wasteHazardous waste generated from research Chemsal Dangerous waste: organic solvents, oxidise, pesticides and “ionising radiation emitting materials not considered to be radioactive” (low level radioactive waste < 100 Becquerel/gram) Sterihealth Biological, clinical waste, ionising radiation emitting materials not considered to be radioactive, human tissue, biological chemicals and other toxic substances.
    • 32. Construction & demolitionWaste management conditions imposed under contract Capital works criteria includes: On-site separation of waste for re-use or recycling Development of a Construction Site Waste Management Plan. Waste management conditions are available for Consultants and Contractors undertaking projects Construction Waste includes: Plaster board, Concrete, Bricks, Steel, Cables and Packaging.
    • 33. What happens to our waste? Waste contract with Doyle Bros Material Recycling Facility > 80% recycled
    • 34. Recyclables marketRecycled aluminumreduces mining andsmelting emissions
    • 35. Recyclables marketBales of dirty plastic areseparated and can berecycled
    • 36. Recyclables marketRecycled baled paper &cardboard reducesdeforestation andenvironmental impact
    • 37. Reducing wasteWater refill stations = Refill not landfill
    • 38. Reducing wasteA step toward reducing plastic water bottle waste
    • 39. Stationery reuseSecond-handstationery free forstudents and staff Stationery Re-use Centre at Level 2, Quad East Wing
    • 40. Stationery reuseOperated byARC volunteers Stationery donated by UNSW staff and corporations
    • 41. Stationery reuseSuccessfulstudent initiative Estimated 4,000 items in last 12 months including approx 1,500 folders, envelopes, plastic sleeves, hanging files, in- trays, clipboards and other random things
    • 42. Container Deposit Legislation Ten cent refund on beverage containers
    • 43. Container Deposit Legislation Regulatory Impact statement underway
    • 44. Container Deposit Legislation Opposed by beverage companies & Packaging Stewardship Forum
    • 45. Electronic wasteTV & PC Product Stewardship Scheme Product Stewardship Act 2011: TV’s & computers first products to be regulated. Responsibility for recycling passed back to manufacturer. Eventually all devices with a power cord to be included. Hopefully running by 2011/12.
    • 46. Food waste & reuse Excess food isdistributed to charities supporting the vulnerable
    • 47. Food waste & reuse Food rescueExcess food given to OzHarvest
    • 48. Food waste & reuse Cooking Oil Up to 800 litres a week is collectedfrom campus outlets
    • 49. The carbon price & wasteCarbon price $23 per tonne from 1/07/12 190 of 500 facilities directly liable for carbon tax are waste facilities
    • 50. The carbon price & waste Waste produces methane 1 tonne of methane = 23 tonne of CO2 equivalent
    • 51. The carbon price & waste Emissions from landfill Landfill more expensive and recycling more cost effective
    • 52. The carbon price & wasteLandfill General Waste tip fee Fee to rise from $220/tonne now to $300/tonne from 1 July 2012
    • 53. Our commitment to reduce wasteThere’s less than 10 yearsof landfill in the Sydney basinUNSW: Environment Policyand Waste Management PlanRethink of waste asa valuable resource
    • 54. Our commitment to reduce waste Our commitment to reduce waste“ Sustainable processing of materials based on fundamentals ” of high temperature Sustainable processing of materials based on fundamentals of high temperature Professor Veena Sahajwalla Centre of Sustainable Materials Research & Technology
    • 55. UNSW SustainabilityKeep in touchwww.recycling.edu.auwww.unsw.edu.au/sustainabilityTwitter | @SustainUNSWFacebook | facebook.com/SustainUNSWSlideshare | slideshare.net/SustainUNSWAaron MagnerUNSW Sustainability DirectorLinkedIn | linkedin.com/in/aaronmagnerTwitter | @aaronmagnerSlideshare | slideshare.net/aaronmagnerPhoto images | Maja Baskawww.majabaska.com