Non fiction collection assignment

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Non fiction collection assignment

  1. 1. 1 Non-Fiction Collection Assignment •ECOLOGY • From the Greek oikos or house. • The natural world that humans • share with all creatures
  2. 2. 2 Our Choice: How We Can Solve The Climate Crisis • By Al Gore. • Melcher Media, 2009. 203 Pg. ISBN 9780670012480. Ages 11 and up. • Gore follows up his eye-opening An Inconvenient Truth (Viking, 2007) by presenting to young people the many possible solutions that might prevent future catastrophic climate changes. This very personal plea introduces the concept of choice on an individual, national, and global level. In chapters discussing a variety of subjects including carbon-free energy sources; forest conservation; overpopulation; and the psychological, political, and religious implications of action and inaction, Gore presents his information clearly and succinctly. Considering the grim prospects ahead, he remains optimistic about a future in which today's youth both understand the problems and are willing to accept the challenges of difficult solutions. He unflinchingly tackles the many forms of misinformation supported by those corporations and entities that stand a chance to lose profits by the changes in energy production and use. Colorful charts and illustrations help to clarify difficult concepts such as "black carbon," "albedo," and "cogeneration." The lack of a glossary, index, and bibliographic citations is unfortunate and may limit the use of the work for research. The book itself is a carbon-neutral publication, printed on post-consumer waste streams, thus adding little to the waste cycle. This is a vital addition to environmental science collections and will prove useful in classroom and science programs. School Library Journal, 2010.
  3. 3. 3 Artic Thaw: The People of the Whale in a Changing Climate • By Peter Lourie. • Boyds Mills Press, 2007. 48 Pg. ISBN 9781590784365. Ages 10-13. • The effects of global warming on the livelihood of the I-upiaq, whale hunters who live on the North Slope of Alaska, are presented and examined in this work. This book is one that can be used both by young readers as well as the general public. Questions posed throughout this book concerning climate change and the human responsibility cause of it, are addressed, with practical and hopeful solutions offered. One of the scientists, Dr. Paul Shepson, is quoted as stating that he sees global warming not as an unavoidable disaster but rather as a challenge, scientific and personal. • Also see School Library Journal review, 2007.
  4. 4. 4 The Dirt on Dirt • By Paulette Bourgeois with Kathy Vanderlinden. • Kids Can Press, 2008. 48 Pg. ISBN 9781554531011. Ages 9-12. • A kaleidoscopic peek into the multifaceted world of dirt-and soil and sand and mattress lint and earthworms and geology and paleontology and (you get the drift). All these fascinating bits are accompanied by a peck of hands-on projects ranging from making a composter out of a milk carton to the production of a delectable "mud cake." The chatty text provides a plethora of facts, interspersed with cartoon drawings, diagrams, and color photos…... More demanding than Christin Ditchfield's simple Soil (Children's Press, 2002) or Steve Tomecek's informative Dirt (National Geographic, 2002), and with a different thrust than Raymond Bial's graceful A Handful of Dirt (Walker, 2000), this book will certainly be a fun source for kids needing science projects and a nifty browser for budding naturalists. • School Library Journal, 2008.
  5. 5. 5 The Down-to-Earth Guide to Global Warming • By Laurie David and Cambria Gordon. • Orchard Books, 2007. 114 Pg. ISBN 9780439024945. Ages 9-12. • David and Gordon present a mass of material on this broad topic in a clearly explained, kid-friendly format. While documenting the decline of species, the dangers presented by melting ice caps, and the hazards of weather-related catastrophes, they also suggest positive and doable steps to address the problems. Eye-catching color illustrations and photos appear throughout, but are often more decorative than informative. Some analogies and statements could use further clarification. "One tree can absorb the amount of CO2 released by an average car that's been driven for 4,000 miles." This rate depends on whether you are discussing the offset for one year or for the lifetime of the tree, as well as its type, age, and size. Most sources feel that it takes far more than one tree to effect this offset. When calculating the "carbon footprint" of an average child, the criteria used are reflective of the industrialized West, yet are applied worldwide. An extensive list of recommended reading in the way of books, articles, and Web sites is included. An appealing title for reports and for general readers. School Library Journal, 2007.
  6. 6. 6 Frog Heaven: Ecology of a Vernal Pool • By Doug Wechsler. • Boyds Mills Press, 2006. 48 Pg. ISBN 9781590782538. Ages 10-13. • A vernal pool is a shallow seasonal body of water which for the majority of years is wet a few weeks of the year. Vernal pools have no water outlets or inlets, and usually lack fish, a condition this book clarifies as a great benefit to its usual inhabitants. The “NO FISH” condition protects various salamanders and frogs species inhabiting this body of water. With no fish present, the Frog named in the book title along with all the other pool inhabitants are thus better able to survive and thrive since there is one major predator not present. Vernal pools are now understood to be essential. They are part of the forest inasmuch as they serve as nurseries for a number of forest inhabitants. As the need to protect vernal pools has become evident, states such as Massachusetts have started programs geared to register them and protect. • This work provides both enjoyable reading and information needed by anyone concerned about protecting the environment. Makes good reading for the tween and older age groups. • Also see School Library Journal review, 2006.
  7. 7. 7 Human Footprint [video recording] • National Geographic , Burbank, California, 2008. DVD. 90 Minutes. ISBN 2799475293. Ages 12 and up. • This DVD will add immensely to collections covering the subject of “Ecology.” And it is a valuable addition whether the collections belong to individuals or are presented in school or public library settings. • The effect that we all have on our home planet as we consume, and later discard our planet’s numerous resources, is visually and clearly brought to our attention. In viewing this work there is no escaping the lesson presented to us. Yes, we will all have quite an impact on our planet. • The method that the creators of this work utilize to drive home their lessons is with the use of the repetition, showing us numerous times the total quantities of earth’s resources that we will individually consume throughout our lifetimes. Unfortunately the use of this technique seems to be overdone and this detracts from the otherwise absolute perfection of this DVD. A suggestion is made that this work be viewed in three or four short spurts and not in one sitting. • Reviewer: M. Pedraza
  8. 8. 8 Myspace/Ourplanet: Change is Possible • By The MYSPACE Community with Jeca Taudte. • The Bowen Press, 2008. 166 Pg. ISBN 9780061562044. Ages 13 and up. • Numerous suggestions concerning what can be done to help the environment are offered in this book written with tweens and teens in mind. • A quick and clear rundown of the global warming we are currently experiencing is given in the introduction and the book continues in the following chapters with many helpful information as to how best eliminate unnecessary fuel and resource consumption. We are urged to combine our tasks and to avoid duplication of trips. Information is given on which beauty and other products contain ingredients harmful to the environment. The suggestions offered are many but very practical. Most importantly, myths and the real facts about the environment are also clarified. • Because this book encourages activism in an area that very much needs as much participation as possible, this book is especially valuable for tweens and teens to look over and make part of their daily lives. • Also see School Library Journal review, 2010.
  9. 9. 9 Our Living Earth: A Story of People, Ecology, and Preservation • By Arthus Bertrand. • Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2008. 157 Pg. ISBN 9780810971325. Ages 10-Up. • Wrapped around Arthus-Bertrand's magnificent aerial photographs from around the world, Delannoy's text is organized thematically, covering fresh water, biodiversity, oceans, land, cities, people, food, and climate. Each category is divided into three to five subtopics. For instance, "Food" looks at industrialized agriculture, the use of pesticides, the issues involved in monoculture, and the problems associated with meat. The pages provide snippets of information and address the myriad challenges of sustainability. Whether it is the discovery that 15 percent of the world's people own 80 percent of its wealth, or that women do two-thirds of the world's work yet earn 15 to 20 percent less than men, even in rich countries, readers will find surprising information and images to ponder. Almost every page supports the overarching theme that social justice and environmental protection are inextricably related. The book also offers hope. While the dramatic oversize photographs, reproduced with sharp resolution, highlight the enormous damage that has already been done to the environment, they also celebrate the beauty of our world. The text and spot illustrations interpret the photographs and give information on ways that individuals and nations can reverse the trends. Overall, this volume raises awareness, and the striking images, astonishing statistics, and brief explanations will stimulate readers to investigate further and possibly to take action. School Library Journal review, 2009.
  10. 10. 9 Our Living Earth: A Story of People, Ecology, and Preservation • By Arthus Bertrand. • Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2008. 157 Pg. ISBN 9780810971325. Ages 10-Up. • Wrapped around Arthus-Bertrand's magnificent aerial photographs from around the world, Delannoy's text is organized thematically, covering fresh water, biodiversity, oceans, land, cities, people, food, and climate. Each category is divided into three to five subtopics. For instance, "Food" looks at industrialized agriculture, the use of pesticides, the issues involved in monoculture, and the problems associated with meat. The pages provide snippets of information and address the myriad challenges of sustainability. Whether it is the discovery that 15 percent of the world's people own 80 percent of its wealth, or that women do two-thirds of the world's work yet earn 15 to 20 percent less than men, even in rich countries, readers will find surprising information and images to ponder. Almost every page supports the overarching theme that social justice and environmental protection are inextricably related. The book also offers hope. While the dramatic oversize photographs, reproduced with sharp resolution, highlight the enormous damage that has already been done to the environment, they also celebrate the beauty of our world. The text and spot illustrations interpret the photographs and give information on ways that individuals and nations can reverse the trends. Overall, this volume raises awareness, and the striking images, astonishing statistics, and brief explanations will stimulate readers to investigate further and possibly to take action. School Library Journal review, 2009.

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