SlideShare a Scribd company logo
The workable, practical guide to Do IT Yourself

Vol. 4.02 • January 8, 2008

How to Define IT Services
By Hank Marquis, Enterprise Management Associates

I TIL

Portfolio Management is all the rage now. It seems everyone wants to define their IT
services, create service catalogs and start the process of business IT alignment. Of course,
ITIL itself does not offer much guidance on exactly how to do these things, nor should it. But
something the ITIL does not mention is exactly what you need...

One of the main reasons so many organizations stall at the IT service definition phase is because ITIL is insufficient in
defining services, and it offers no help in developing an IT service definition model.
To find the best IT service definition framework. I started by asking myself who has been thinking about how to offer
standard IT service offerings based on shared support and delivery models longer than anyone else?
I believe that in my quest I have discovered the most elegant, easy to understand, logical and powerful IT service
definition model in the world. You can use this model to define your IT services and create a service portfolio hierarchy in
a day or less.
Following I introduce the de facto global standard for IT service definition you have probably never heard about.

The Service Information and Data Model
Telephone companies have been selling services for over 100 years. The Telemanagement Forum (TMF) is an
international group of telecommunications carriers and service providers, and the TMF New Generation Operations
Systems and Software (NGOSS) Service Information Data model (SID) is de facto standard for IT service definition.
SID concepts include products, services and resources, and SID combines very nicely with ITIL to offer a layered construct
for IT service provisioning based on unambiguous service definitions. SID defines a product as what the enterprise sells or
delivers; services as those things that create deliver or support a product; and resources as what comprises a service.
SID defines two types of services -- Customer Facing and Resource Facing. Customer Facing Services (CFS) are used and
acquired by a customer. CFS are directly opposite to Resource Facing Services (RFS). RFS support CFS but are not visible
to or acquired by a customer. RFS are used only to build CFS. We can now easily define any service as Customer or
Resource facing.
For example, imagine your enterprise was in the building products industry, and your core product was concrete. Your
customers use CFS to carry out the business of the enterprise -- making, delivering and selling concrete. Thinking about
the product and business processes leads you to realize a CFS is, for example, telephone service -- which your customers
use to receive orders and dispatch trucks.
Such a service could include other CFS as well, perhaps a voice mail CFS option. Consider a voice mail Customer Facing
Service. It may not operate without routing and storage services, relying perhaps upon a Resource Facing Service (RFS) of
“Domain Name Services” (DNS.) Customers are usually unaware of RFS, and RFS are usually shared by many CFS. CFS
consist of RFS, and RFS may not be acquired by a customer except as part of a CFS.

http://www.itsmsolutions.com/newsletters/DITYvol4iss02.htm

Page: 1 of 2
A Resource Facing Service, for example DNS consists of IT resources like individual (classic) ITIL Configuration Items of
hardware, software, data, etc. IT resources underpin RFS, and most IT resources are shared across several and in many
cases all Resource Facing Services.
In summary:
Define a product your enterprise creates, supports or delivers
Identify those IT services that create or support the product -- these are Customer Facing Services (CFS)
Everything else that is “back to back” with, and create, these services are Resource Facing Services (RFS)
Technology bits like routers, switches, computers, etc. are resources and combine to create RFS

Summary
SID is the simplest, easiest to understand and most logical taxonomy for IT service definition I have every seen or used.
Using this methodology you should be able to define and agree IT services in hours instead of weeks.

Entire Contents © 2007 itSM Solutions® LLC. All Rights Reserved.
ITIL ® and IT Infrastructure Library ® are Registered Trade Marks of the Office of Government Commerce and is used here by itSM Solutions LLC under license from and with the permission of OGC
(Trade Mark License No. 0002).

http://www.itsmsolutions.com/newsletters/DITYvol4iss02.htm

Page: 2 of 2

More Related Content

Similar to Dit yvol4iss02

IT Service Management.pdf
IT Service Management.pdfIT Service Management.pdf
IT Service Management.pdf
ArisenTechnologies1
 
Dit yvol3iss2
Dit yvol3iss2Dit yvol3iss2
Dit yvol3iss2
Rick Lemieux
 
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT OrganizationNew Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
EMC
 
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in ActionWestern Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
Chris Dancy
 
Dit yvol2iss39
Dit yvol2iss39Dit yvol2iss39
Dit yvol2iss39
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol2iss27
Dit yvol2iss27Dit yvol2iss27
Dit yvol2iss27
Rick Lemieux
 
ITIL Service Desk
ITIL Service DeskITIL Service Desk
ITIL Service Desk
jmansur1
 
PowerPoint presentation
PowerPoint presentationPowerPoint presentation
PowerPoint presentation
webhostingguy
 
Dit yvol1iss3
Dit yvol1iss3Dit yvol1iss3
Dit yvol1iss3
Rick Lemieux
 
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
Michele Hudnall
 
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
EMC
 
Dit yvol2iss33
Dit yvol2iss33Dit yvol2iss33
Dit yvol2iss33
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol2iss13
Dit yvol2iss13Dit yvol2iss13
Dit yvol2iss13
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol3iss19
Dit yvol3iss19Dit yvol3iss19
Dit yvol3iss19
Rick Lemieux
 
Product snd Service Catalogue
Product snd Service CatalogueProduct snd Service Catalogue
Product snd Service Catalogue
Raymond Koh
 
Dit yvol3iss4
Dit yvol3iss4Dit yvol3iss4
Dit yvol3iss4
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol4iss28
Dit yvol4iss28Dit yvol4iss28
Dit yvol4iss28
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol2iss43
Dit yvol2iss43Dit yvol2iss43
Dit yvol2iss43
Rick Lemieux
 
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a BusinessThe Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
Nathaniel Palmer
 
Dit yvol2iss44
Dit yvol2iss44Dit yvol2iss44
Dit yvol2iss44
Rick Lemieux
 

Similar to Dit yvol4iss02 (20)

IT Service Management.pdf
IT Service Management.pdfIT Service Management.pdf
IT Service Management.pdf
 
Dit yvol3iss2
Dit yvol3iss2Dit yvol3iss2
Dit yvol3iss2
 
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT OrganizationNew Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
New Skills for the Service-Oriented IT Organization
 
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in ActionWestern Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
Western Region Speaking Tour -- Service Catalog in Action
 
Dit yvol2iss39
Dit yvol2iss39Dit yvol2iss39
Dit yvol2iss39
 
Dit yvol2iss27
Dit yvol2iss27Dit yvol2iss27
Dit yvol2iss27
 
ITIL Service Desk
ITIL Service DeskITIL Service Desk
ITIL Service Desk
 
PowerPoint presentation
PowerPoint presentationPowerPoint presentation
PowerPoint presentation
 
Dit yvol1iss3
Dit yvol1iss3Dit yvol1iss3
Dit yvol1iss3
 
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
2005-0801 - NetworkWorld - ITIL
 
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
An IT-as-a-Service Handbook: 10 Key Steps on the Journey to ITaaS
 
Dit yvol2iss33
Dit yvol2iss33Dit yvol2iss33
Dit yvol2iss33
 
Dit yvol2iss13
Dit yvol2iss13Dit yvol2iss13
Dit yvol2iss13
 
Dit yvol3iss19
Dit yvol3iss19Dit yvol3iss19
Dit yvol3iss19
 
Product snd Service Catalogue
Product snd Service CatalogueProduct snd Service Catalogue
Product snd Service Catalogue
 
Dit yvol3iss4
Dit yvol3iss4Dit yvol3iss4
Dit yvol3iss4
 
Dit yvol4iss28
Dit yvol4iss28Dit yvol4iss28
Dit yvol4iss28
 
Dit yvol2iss43
Dit yvol2iss43Dit yvol2iss43
Dit yvol2iss43
 
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a BusinessThe Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
The Business of IT: Understanding ITIL and How to Run IT as a Business
 
Dit yvol2iss44
Dit yvol2iss44Dit yvol2iss44
Dit yvol2iss44
 

More from Rick Lemieux

IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT AlignementIT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss41
Dit yvol5iss41Dit yvol5iss41
Dit yvol5iss41
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss40
Dit yvol5iss40Dit yvol5iss40
Dit yvol5iss40
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss38
Dit yvol5iss38Dit yvol5iss38
Dit yvol5iss38
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss37
Dit yvol5iss37Dit yvol5iss37
Dit yvol5iss37
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss36
Dit yvol5iss36Dit yvol5iss36
Dit yvol5iss36
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss35
Dit yvol5iss35Dit yvol5iss35
Dit yvol5iss35
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss34
Dit yvol5iss34Dit yvol5iss34
Dit yvol5iss34
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss31
Dit yvol5iss31Dit yvol5iss31
Dit yvol5iss31
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss33
Dit yvol5iss33Dit yvol5iss33
Dit yvol5iss33
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss32
Dit yvol5iss32Dit yvol5iss32
Dit yvol5iss32
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss30
Dit yvol5iss30Dit yvol5iss30
Dit yvol5iss30
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss29
Dit yvol5iss29Dit yvol5iss29
Dit yvol5iss29
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss28
Dit yvol5iss28Dit yvol5iss28
Dit yvol5iss28
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss26
Dit yvol5iss26Dit yvol5iss26
Dit yvol5iss26
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss25
Dit yvol5iss25Dit yvol5iss25
Dit yvol5iss25
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss24
Dit yvol5iss24Dit yvol5iss24
Dit yvol5iss24
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss23
Dit yvol5iss23Dit yvol5iss23
Dit yvol5iss23
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss22
Dit yvol5iss22Dit yvol5iss22
Dit yvol5iss22
Rick Lemieux
 
Dit yvol5iss21
Dit yvol5iss21Dit yvol5iss21
Dit yvol5iss21
Rick Lemieux
 

More from Rick Lemieux (20)

IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT AlignementIT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
IT Service Management (ITSM) Model for Business & IT Alignement
 
Dit yvol5iss41
Dit yvol5iss41Dit yvol5iss41
Dit yvol5iss41
 
Dit yvol5iss40
Dit yvol5iss40Dit yvol5iss40
Dit yvol5iss40
 
Dit yvol5iss38
Dit yvol5iss38Dit yvol5iss38
Dit yvol5iss38
 
Dit yvol5iss37
Dit yvol5iss37Dit yvol5iss37
Dit yvol5iss37
 
Dit yvol5iss36
Dit yvol5iss36Dit yvol5iss36
Dit yvol5iss36
 
Dit yvol5iss35
Dit yvol5iss35Dit yvol5iss35
Dit yvol5iss35
 
Dit yvol5iss34
Dit yvol5iss34Dit yvol5iss34
Dit yvol5iss34
 
Dit yvol5iss31
Dit yvol5iss31Dit yvol5iss31
Dit yvol5iss31
 
Dit yvol5iss33
Dit yvol5iss33Dit yvol5iss33
Dit yvol5iss33
 
Dit yvol5iss32
Dit yvol5iss32Dit yvol5iss32
Dit yvol5iss32
 
Dit yvol5iss30
Dit yvol5iss30Dit yvol5iss30
Dit yvol5iss30
 
Dit yvol5iss29
Dit yvol5iss29Dit yvol5iss29
Dit yvol5iss29
 
Dit yvol5iss28
Dit yvol5iss28Dit yvol5iss28
Dit yvol5iss28
 
Dit yvol5iss26
Dit yvol5iss26Dit yvol5iss26
Dit yvol5iss26
 
Dit yvol5iss25
Dit yvol5iss25Dit yvol5iss25
Dit yvol5iss25
 
Dit yvol5iss24
Dit yvol5iss24Dit yvol5iss24
Dit yvol5iss24
 
Dit yvol5iss23
Dit yvol5iss23Dit yvol5iss23
Dit yvol5iss23
 
Dit yvol5iss22
Dit yvol5iss22Dit yvol5iss22
Dit yvol5iss22
 
Dit yvol5iss21
Dit yvol5iss21Dit yvol5iss21
Dit yvol5iss21
 

Dit yvol4iss02

  • 1. The workable, practical guide to Do IT Yourself Vol. 4.02 • January 8, 2008 How to Define IT Services By Hank Marquis, Enterprise Management Associates I TIL Portfolio Management is all the rage now. It seems everyone wants to define their IT services, create service catalogs and start the process of business IT alignment. Of course, ITIL itself does not offer much guidance on exactly how to do these things, nor should it. But something the ITIL does not mention is exactly what you need... One of the main reasons so many organizations stall at the IT service definition phase is because ITIL is insufficient in defining services, and it offers no help in developing an IT service definition model. To find the best IT service definition framework. I started by asking myself who has been thinking about how to offer standard IT service offerings based on shared support and delivery models longer than anyone else? I believe that in my quest I have discovered the most elegant, easy to understand, logical and powerful IT service definition model in the world. You can use this model to define your IT services and create a service portfolio hierarchy in a day or less. Following I introduce the de facto global standard for IT service definition you have probably never heard about. The Service Information and Data Model Telephone companies have been selling services for over 100 years. The Telemanagement Forum (TMF) is an international group of telecommunications carriers and service providers, and the TMF New Generation Operations Systems and Software (NGOSS) Service Information Data model (SID) is de facto standard for IT service definition. SID concepts include products, services and resources, and SID combines very nicely with ITIL to offer a layered construct for IT service provisioning based on unambiguous service definitions. SID defines a product as what the enterprise sells or delivers; services as those things that create deliver or support a product; and resources as what comprises a service. SID defines two types of services -- Customer Facing and Resource Facing. Customer Facing Services (CFS) are used and acquired by a customer. CFS are directly opposite to Resource Facing Services (RFS). RFS support CFS but are not visible to or acquired by a customer. RFS are used only to build CFS. We can now easily define any service as Customer or Resource facing. For example, imagine your enterprise was in the building products industry, and your core product was concrete. Your customers use CFS to carry out the business of the enterprise -- making, delivering and selling concrete. Thinking about the product and business processes leads you to realize a CFS is, for example, telephone service -- which your customers use to receive orders and dispatch trucks. Such a service could include other CFS as well, perhaps a voice mail CFS option. Consider a voice mail Customer Facing Service. It may not operate without routing and storage services, relying perhaps upon a Resource Facing Service (RFS) of “Domain Name Services” (DNS.) Customers are usually unaware of RFS, and RFS are usually shared by many CFS. CFS consist of RFS, and RFS may not be acquired by a customer except as part of a CFS. http://www.itsmsolutions.com/newsletters/DITYvol4iss02.htm Page: 1 of 2
  • 2. A Resource Facing Service, for example DNS consists of IT resources like individual (classic) ITIL Configuration Items of hardware, software, data, etc. IT resources underpin RFS, and most IT resources are shared across several and in many cases all Resource Facing Services. In summary: Define a product your enterprise creates, supports or delivers Identify those IT services that create or support the product -- these are Customer Facing Services (CFS) Everything else that is “back to back” with, and create, these services are Resource Facing Services (RFS) Technology bits like routers, switches, computers, etc. are resources and combine to create RFS Summary SID is the simplest, easiest to understand and most logical taxonomy for IT service definition I have every seen or used. Using this methodology you should be able to define and agree IT services in hours instead of weeks. Entire Contents © 2007 itSM Solutions® LLC. All Rights Reserved. ITIL ® and IT Infrastructure Library ® are Registered Trade Marks of the Office of Government Commerce and is used here by itSM Solutions LLC under license from and with the permission of OGC (Trade Mark License No. 0002). http://www.itsmsolutions.com/newsletters/DITYvol4iss02.htm Page: 2 of 2