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2
Image Kadir van Lohuizen
Image Kadir van Lohuizen
90% disasters
40% population
15% GDP
50% aquifers
Water by Numbers
Water threats’ business case…
an urban world
Figure 2: The Global Risks Interconnections Map 2016
State collapse or crisis
Unemployment or
underemployment
Asset bubble...
Figure 2: The Global Risks Interconnections Map 2016
State collapse or crisis
Unemployment or
underemployment
Asset bubble...
IMAGE: SCAPE/LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
We are the turning point
12
5 YEARS TO CHANGE THE CURVES…
What comes next is the massive task to undo these failing
actions, mitigate their origins...
long term &
comprehensive
short term &
innovative
programmatic approach
&
institutional capacity
ppp funding &
accountabil...
The Netherlands - culture of living with water
Trade, negotiations and crafts, stubbornness, luck and faith.
Managing risk...
MAN MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS
COLLECTIVE
MAN MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS
1122	
  -­‐	
  the	
  first	
  collabora0on	
  started	
  in	
  the	
  
Utrecht	
  are...
Overview of OECD Principles on Water Governance
The OECD Principles on Water Governance are expected to contribute to impr...
Institutional layers of water management in the Netherlands
Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment
Water, spatial ...
two principles :
SAFETY
and
QUALITY
1421 St. Elizabeth Flood
MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS
SAFETY: DIKE SYSTEM - 22.000 kilometers of dikes,
dunes and levees
WATER NETWORK: NETHERLANDS > EUROPE
ZUIDERZEE LEAGUE
WATERLAND, WATERCITIES
Transforming the institutional
• 1122: Regional Water Authorities, over
300, now 23
• 1798: Establishment of Rijkswatersta...
1916 flood
• Response: Zuiderzee works
• Enclosure dam of Zuiderzee and 5 polders
Zuiderzee works
1953
Post 1953: Delta works + new
safety strategy
• Delta commission
• Delta works scheme
• Closing off estuaries
• Compartimen...
1995
250.000 people
evacuated
BUILDING WITH NATURE ‘room for the river’
Room for the River: 39 projects – € 2.3 bln
24 25
PROJECT
Local community
participation in the
Overdiepse Polder
A particular example of local community
participation...
Safe?
Dijkenatlas - LOLA / NAI010
Safe?
Dijkenatlas - LOLA / NAI010
The threat is not acute, 	
  
but measures to improve 	
  
flood risk management and 	
  
fresh water supply and a
proper ...
• Delta Act, legal base for Delta
program, fund and commissioner
• Delta Program (providing
continuous implementation),
• ...
DUTCH DELTA APPROACH
Multi-layered approach:
3. RESPONSE:

Disaster management
2. PLAN
Land use planning
(new developments...
1. Water Safety: protecting people and the
economy from floods
2. Freshwater Supply: limiting water
shortages and using fr...
It's cultural
safe&secu
republice
nvironment
airquality
energy
efficientbu
ildings
waste&
recourceef
ficiency
clean
&
securee
nergy
heal...
Image by Iwan Baan
programmatic approach
&
institutional capacity
ppp funding &
accountability
inclusive
collaboration
long term &
comprehens...
long term &
comprehensive
short term &
innovative
programmatic approach
&
institutional capacity
ppp funding &
accountabil...
DESIGN AND INNOVATION IN PLANNING PROCES
AMBITION
OPPORTUNITYTECHNIQUE
win - win
publicsupport
faster&
better
Transforma0ve	
  Approach	
  Perspec0ves
SAFE PLACE
COMPLEX
SITUATION
ASSESS
PROBLEM
FORM
GOVERNMENT
TASK FORCE
IDENTIFY
PHILANTHROPIC
FUNDING
SELECT
PARTNERS
CALL FOR
TALENT...
RESILIENCE FRAME - NECESSITY by design
yesterday today tomorrow the day after
DESIGN AND INNOVATION IN PLANNING PROCES
CHANGING ROLES FOR ALL ACTORS
TALENT MEETS TALENT
COLLABORATION!
1122	
  -­‐	
  the	
  first	
  collabora0on	
  started	
  in	
  the	
  
Utrecht	
  area,	
  where	
  20	
  c...
INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP
65
Asbury Park Capacity-Building: The City of Asbury Park
HUD Rebuild by Design | HR&A Advisors with ...
“So the question is not whether we need to act. The overwhelming judgment of science, accumulated and
measured and reviewe...
meets…
Then
City(state)Inclusive
Network
PragmaticidealismDistributionCooperationSharing
Tra
Now
NationExclusive
Hub
Pater...
Delta Coalition - launched at UNISDR
Sendai DRR Conference March 2015
The Netherlands, Japan,
Colombia, Philippines,
Vietn...
↳0.
A Strong and Bonding Narrative
Change always begins with the development of a strong and bonding
narrative, a positive...
COUNTRIES
UNITED NATIONS WORLD BANK
Australia
Mexico
Peru
South Africa
Senegal
Tajikistan
Jordan
Hungary
Bangladesh
South ...
Action Plan
This Action Plan is a living document and Panel members
expect to update it over the life of the Panel
Septemb...
Then
City(state)Inclusive
Network
PragmaticidealismDistributionCooperationSharing
Tra
Now
NationExclusive
Hub
Paternalisti...
COMPLEX
SITUATION
ASSESS
PROBLEM
FORM
GOVERNMENT
TASK FORCE
IDENTIFY
PHILANTHROPIC
FUNDING
SELECT
PARTNERS
CALL FOR
TALENT...
Dutch River Region
4 million
Rural
Just above
EUR 2.3
billion
Extremely high water levels. That
is the greatest challenge ...
Bangladesh Delta
155 million
Rural,
with several rapidly
urbanising cities
Just above
EUR
7.65 million
Bangladesh, encompa...
Nile Delta
10 million
Urban
and rural
Just above
EUR 2.4
million
The Nile delta is heavily
populated, with up to 1,600
inh...
Ayeyarwady
Delta
6.6 million
+3 m
Rural
The Ayeyarwady Delta in
Myanmar is extremely fertile.
The area, which is plagued b...
Beira
0.6 million
Urban
Just above
Approx. EUR 2 million
Beira and Rotterdam: two
low-lying cities in densely
populated de...
Vistula and Oder
Delta
2 million
Urban
and rural
-1.8 m to +2.5 m
Poland is a country of water,
although it does not have ...
Mekong Delta
17 million
(expected shrink to 15 or
growth to 30 million)
Urbanisation 28%
Greater parts + 1.5 m
In the past...
Upper valley of the Cauca
River
4,5 million
Rural and urban
+1,000 to +1,200 m
Approx. EUR
2.5 million
Inundation in the C...
North East
region USA
NYC 9.5 million,
New Jersey 8.8 million
Urban
2.5
metres (lowest point NYC)
USD 930
million
Hurrican...
77
5 YEARS TO CHANGE THE CURVES…
What comes next is the massive task to undo these failing
actions, mitigate their origins...
water
a global approach
not about making a plan
but about changing the culture
79
20161104 water management
20161104 water management
20161104 water management
20161104 water management
20161104 water management
20161104 water management
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20161104 water management

  1. 1. 2
  2. 2. Image Kadir van Lohuizen
  3. 3. Image Kadir van Lohuizen
  4. 4. 90% disasters 40% population 15% GDP 50% aquifers Water by Numbers
  5. 5. Water threats’ business case…
  6. 6. an urban world
  7. 7. Figure 2: The Global Risks Interconnections Map 2016 State collapse or crisis Unemployment or underemployment Asset bubble Deflation Failure of financial mechanism or institution Failure of critical infrastructure Fiscal crises Illicit trade Energy price shock Unmanageable inflation Extreme weather events Failure of climate-change Biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse Natural catastrophes Man-made environmental catastrophes Failure of national governance Interstate conflict Terrorist attacks Weapons of mass destruction Failure of urban planning Food crises Large-scale involuntary migration Profound social instability Spread of infectious diseases Water crises Adverse consequences of technological advances Critical information infrastructure breakdown Cyberattacks mitigation and adaptation Data fraud or theft Source: Global Risks Perception Survey 2015. Note: Survey respondents were asked to identify between three and six pairs of global risks they believe to be most interconnected. See Appendix B for more details. To ensure legibility, the names of the global risks are abbreviated; see Appendix A for the full name and description. 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 4.87 average 4.76 average Data fraud or theft Asset bubble Deflation Failure of financial mechanism or institution Failure of critical infrastructure Fiscal crises Unemployment or underemployment Illicit trade Energy price shock Unmanageable inflation Extreme weather events Biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse Natural catastrophes Man-made environmental catastrophes Failure of national governance Interstate conflict Terrorist attacks State collapse or crisis Weapons of mass destruction Failure of urban planning Food crises Large-scale involuntary migration Profound social instability Spread of infectious diseases Water crises Adverse consequences of technological advances Critical information infrastructure breakdown Cyberattacks Failure of climate-change mitigation and adaptation failure of climate change adaptation and mitigation large scale involuntary migration water crises climate change biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse extreme weather events natural catastrophes man made environmental catastrophes WEF Global Risks 2016, 11th Edition URGENCY INTERDEPENDENCY Risks, uncertainties and opportunities
  8. 8. Figure 2: The Global Risks Interconnections Map 2016 State collapse or crisis Unemployment or underemployment Asset bubble Deflation Failure of financial mechanism or institution Failure of critical infrastructure Fiscal crises Illicit trade Energy price shock Unmanageable inflation Extreme weather events Failure of climate-change Biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse Natural catastrophes Man-made environmental catastrophes Failure of national governance Interstate conflict Terrorist attacks Weapons of mass destruction Failure of urban planning Food crises Large-scale involuntary migration Profound social instability Spread of infectious diseases Water crises Adverse consequences of technological advances Critical information infrastructure breakdown Cyberattacks mitigation and adaptation Data fraud or theft Source: Global Risks Perception Survey 2015. Note: Survey respondents were asked to identify between three and six pairs of global risks they believe to be most interconnected. See Appendix B for more details. To ensure legibility, the names of the global risks are abbreviated; see Appendix A for the full name and description. 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 4.87 average 4.76 average Data fraud or theft Asset bubble Deflation Failure of financial mechanism or institution Failure of critical infrastructure Fiscal crises Unemployment or underemployment Illicit trade Energy price shock Unmanageable inflation Extreme weather events Biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse Natural catastrophes Man-made environmental catastrophes Failure of national governance Interstate conflict Terrorist attacks State collapse or crisis Weapons of mass destruction Failure of urban planning Food crises Large-scale involuntary migration Profound social instability Spread of infectious diseases Water crises Adverse consequences of technological advances Critical information infrastructure breakdown Cyberattacks Failure of climate-change mitigation and adaptation WEF Global Risks 2016, 11th Edition URGENCY INTERDEPENDENCY Mismatch - future’s risks demand transformative capacity
  9. 9. IMAGE: SCAPE/LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE We are the turning point
  10. 10. 12 5 YEARS TO CHANGE THE CURVES… What comes next is the massive task to undo these failing actions, mitigate their origins, adapt for their impacts and rethink the future and our responsibilities.
  11. 11. long term & comprehensive short term & innovative programmatic approach & institutional capacity ppp funding & accountability inclusive collaboration design
  12. 12. The Netherlands - culture of living with water Trade, negotiations and crafts, stubbornness, luck and faith. Managing risks and uncertainties. The Netherlands is made out of water Below sea level: 26% Liable to flooding: 59% Above sea level: 29% Outside the dykes: 3% Meuse outside the dykes: 1% County of Holland, 16th Century Woodcut by Sebastian Münster
  13. 13. MAN MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS
  14. 14. COLLECTIVE
  15. 15. MAN MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS 1122  -­‐  the  first  collabora0on  started  in  the   Utrecht  area,  where  20  communi0es  worked   together  on  the  local  embankment
  16. 16. Overview of OECD Principles on Water Governance The OECD Principles on Water Governance are expected to contribute to improving the “Water Governance Cycle” from policy design to implementation. The Water Governance Cycle TRUST & ENGAGEMENT Clear roles & responsibilities Capacity Policy coherence Appropriate scales within basin systems Regulatory Frameworks Data & information Financing Innovative governance Trade-offs across users, rural and urban areas, and generations Integrity & Transparency Monitoring & Evaluation Stakeholder engagement WATER GOVERNANCE From good water governance The OECD Principles on Water Governance are expected to contribute to improving the Governance Cycle” from policy design to implementation. The Water Governance Cycle Source: Forthcoming, OECD Working Paper, 2015, Water Governance Indicators WATER GOVERNANCE Formulation of policies and strategies Implementation Monitoring Evaluation From good water governance To better water governance Bridging the gap Assessing the gaps Indicators Actions Principles New instruments or improvements
  17. 17. Institutional layers of water management in the Netherlands Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment Water, spatial planning and flood protection at national level Planning of the national water policy Co-ordination with other policy areas (spatial planning, environment, economic development, agriculture, etc.) European level National level European Union Legislation and regulation for water, floods and the environment International River BasinCommissions (Rhine, Scheldt, Meuse, Ems) Cross-border water management National Water Authority Operation and maintenance of main water system Regional water authorities (24) Operation and management of regional water systems Flood defence Water quality & water quantity Wastewater transport & treatment Municipalities (408) Local spatial planning Sewerage collection & wastewater transport Urban drainage Stormwater collection Municipal levelWatershed level Provinces (12) Integrated spatial and environmental planning Supervision of regional water authorities (RWAs) Groundwater regulation Co-ordination with other regional policy areas Provincial level
  18. 18. two principles : SAFETY and QUALITY
  19. 19. 1421 St. Elizabeth Flood
  20. 20. MAKING LAND: 3500+ DUTCH POLDERS
  21. 21. SAFETY: DIKE SYSTEM - 22.000 kilometers of dikes, dunes and levees
  22. 22. WATER NETWORK: NETHERLANDS > EUROPE
  23. 23. ZUIDERZEE LEAGUE WATERLAND, WATERCITIES
  24. 24. Transforming the institutional • 1122: Regional Water Authorities, over 300, now 23 • 1798: Establishment of Rijkswaterstaat • 1809-now: Ministry of Water/ Infrastructure (1947: VenW; 2010: IenM) • 1814: Water management in Constitution • 1916: Disastrous surge that led to decisions on previous plans for closing the Zuiderzee (Stevin, Kloppenburg, Faddegon) • 1916: Deltaplan dr Lely • 1918: Zuiderzee Law • 1953: Watersnoodramp (disastrous surge South Western part of the Netherlands) • 1953: Delta Committee • 1958: Delta Law • 2007-now: Room for the River • 2008: Delta Committee • 2010: Merger of VROM and VenW into Infrastructure and Environment • 2010: Economic approach: Topsector Water • 2014: Deltaplan accepted by parliament (funding until 2050) • 2015: Special Water Envoy…
  25. 25. 1916 flood • Response: Zuiderzee works • Enclosure dam of Zuiderzee and 5 polders Zuiderzee works
  26. 26. 1953
  27. 27. Post 1953: Delta works + new safety strategy • Delta commission • Delta works scheme • Closing off estuaries • Compartimention works • Shorter coast line and fresh water reservoirs • New closure techniques, • New safety strategy • National dike designs based on frequency of water levels
  28. 28. 1995 250.000 people evacuated
  29. 29. BUILDING WITH NATURE ‘room for the river’
  30. 30. Room for the River: 39 projects – € 2.3 bln
  31. 31. 24 25 PROJECT Local community participation in the Overdiepse Polder A particular example of local community participation was the motivation that was shown in setting up the Overdiepse Polder Association that was made up of dairy farmers working in the Polder who were going to be affected by the Room for the River Programme. Together with the Province of North Brabant, they came up with the idea of constructing mounds (terps) in the polder on which they could rebuild their farmhouses. Work was carried out and their farms have now been re-located on eight mounds. Furthermore, their capacity to grow has not been compromised. If high water levels lead to flooding in the Polder, their farmhouses will still be on dry land. In 2012, the Overdiepse Polder Association was awarded the Water Innovation Prize in the category of Local Interest Organization and Unique Initiatives. In addition to increasing high water level protection, Room for the River has enabled dairy farmers, on their own initiative, to implement a plan to build mounds for their farms.
  32. 32. Safe?
  33. 33. Dijkenatlas - LOLA / NAI010 Safe?
  34. 34. Dijkenatlas - LOLA / NAI010
  35. 35. The threat is not acute,   but measures to improve   flood risk management and   fresh water supply and a proper organization   should be prepared urgently! FROM RE-ACT (1953) TO ACT - Delta Commission, 2008
  36. 36. • Delta Act, legal base for Delta program, fund and commissioner • Delta Program (providing continuous implementation), • Delta Fund, 1.0 bln є / yr (providing financial stability), • Delta Commissioner (providing leadership), • Delta decisions (providing strategic direction for the long term). Proper organization: prerequisites for future-proof implementation The Delta Programme goals: Safety against flooding and adequate freshwater supply also at the end of the century. 38
  37. 37. DUTCH DELTA APPROACH Multi-layered approach: 3. RESPONSE:
 Disaster management 2. PLAN Land use planning (new developments, vital infrastructure) 1. PROTECT Dam's, dikes, levees, dunes,....
  38. 38. 1. Water Safety: protecting people and the economy from floods 2. Freshwater Supply: limiting water shortages and using freshwater supply 3. Spatial Adaptation: water-robust and climate-proof (re)development 4. Rhine-Meuse Delta: water safety in the Rhine-Meuse Delta 5. IJsselmeer Region: water safety and freshwater supply in IJsselmeer Region Plus: a strategic Decision on Sand, including beach nourishment along the coast. Five Delta Decisions National frameworks developed in collaboration with the authorities, civil society organisations and the business community
  39. 39. It's cultural
  40. 40. safe&secu republice nvironment airquality energy efficientbu ildings waste& recourceef ficiency clean & securee nergy health transpo rtation&lo gistics bigdata f oodsecurit y water efficient uselandan d subsoil resource efficientin dustries need to master the following interrelating challenges: testing lab for the world
  41. 41. Image by Iwan Baan
  42. 42. programmatic approach & institutional capacity ppp funding & accountability inclusive collaboration long term & comprehensive short term & innovative
  43. 43. long term & comprehensive short term & innovative programmatic approach & institutional capacity ppp funding & accountability inclusive collaboration design
  44. 44. DESIGN AND INNOVATION IN PLANNING PROCES AMBITION OPPORTUNITYTECHNIQUE win - win publicsupport faster& better
  45. 45. Transforma0ve  Approach  Perspec0ves
  46. 46. SAFE PLACE
  47. 47. COMPLEX SITUATION ASSESS PROBLEM FORM GOVERNMENT TASK FORCE IDENTIFY PHILANTHROPIC FUNDING SELECT PARTNERS CALL FOR TALENT BUILD RESEARCH ADVISORY GROUP FUNDINGANNOUNCED FINALPUBLICEXHIBITION SELECT TALENT WORK WITH GOVERNMENT PARTNERS FORM WORKING GROUPS & SHARE KNOWLEDGE INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & INVESTIGATIONS LECTURES, SITE VISITS, WORKSHOPS CRITIQUE DESIGNS COMMUNITY OUTREACH COMPILE RESEARCH REPORT DESIGN PROPOSAL SELECTION PUBLIC EXHIBITION OF IDEAS ROUNDTABLES DESIGN REFINEMENT COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS PUBLIC EVENTS TEST AND DESIGN APPROACHES ANALYZE STAKEHOLDERS BUILD COALITIONS FUNDING ALLOCATED ON GOING ENGAGEMENT DESIGN REFINEMENT BEGIN CONSTRUCTION The Task Force and their core group of advisors and staff created a unique structure for the competition. A series of stages was established that would orient the design process around in-depth research, cross-sector and cross-professional collaboration, and iterative design development. The design process incorporated a variety of inputs to ensure that each stage’s deliverables were based on the best knowledge and talent, and that the final proposals would be replicable, regional, and implementable. Objective Gather the talent of the world to work with the talent of the Sandy-affected region. Process The Task Force issues a Request for Qualifications calling for teams to assemble themselves in interdisciplinary partnerships to tackle the region’s physical and social vulnerabilities. To incentivize participation, the federal government pledges funding to implement the winning designs while private philanthropy pledges prize money for competitors. Result Ten finalist design teams are selected comprising a diverse and complementary skill sets and approaches. Objective Establish the broadest possible understanding of the region’s vulnerabilities to climate events to enhance resilience. Process Rebuild by Design’s local partner organizations create an intensive, three-month program of field research to introduce teams to a variety of local stakeholders, providing a comprehensive view of the storm’s effects—the damage it created as well as the longstanding problems it uncovered or exacer- bated. A Research Advisory Board leads the teams through the region to learn from a variety of perspec- tives, and teams conduct additional research to supplement this on-the-ground work. Research is collaborative across teams and focuses on typologies as well as locations. Result A research report and public presentation from each team that includes three to five “design opportunities” describing concep- tual approaches for interventions. Objective Develop implementable solutions that have support from local communities and governments. Process A jury selects approximately one design opportunity for each team to fully develop. Teams then gather diverse local stakeholders into community coalitions, with whom they begin a four-month process of co-designing the final intervention. Using meetings, colloquia, charettes, and non-traditional events to gain the broadest perspectives, they create solutions than address not only disaster scenarios, but enrich the daily life of community members. Result Ten fully developed, imple- mentable resilience proposals that champion communities’ visions for future development, and have support from the community and the backing of local governments. Objective Governments and community stakeholders work together to build the projects. Process HUD transfers disaster recovery funds to City and State Governments to implement the first stages of the winning designs. Teams work with them to further refine the interventions and proceed with permits and environmental impact assessments leading to construction. HUD sets strong guidelines for community involvement to ensure that the coalitions formed during the competition continue to be involved through implementation. Result A more resilient region achieved through collaboration and design. TALENT DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH 1 3 4 2 1 Designing a Process PROCESS & PLACE - SABBATICAL DETOUR MODEL
  48. 48. RESILIENCE FRAME - NECESSITY by design yesterday today tomorrow the day after
  49. 49. DESIGN AND INNOVATION IN PLANNING PROCES
  50. 50. CHANGING ROLES FOR ALL ACTORS
  51. 51. TALENT MEETS TALENT
  52. 52. COLLABORATION! 1122  -­‐  the  first  collabora0on  started  in  the   Utrecht  area,  where  20  communi0es  worked   together  on  the  local  embankment
  53. 53. INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP 65 Asbury Park Capacity-Building: The City of Asbury Park HUD Rebuild by Design | HR&A Advisors with Cooper, Robertson & Partners
  54. 54. “So the question is not whether we need to act. The overwhelming judgment of science, accumulated and measured and reviewed and sliced and diced over decades, has put that to rest. The question is whether we have the will to act before it’s too late. Because if we fail to protect the world we leave our children, then we fail in the most fundamental purpose of us being here in the first place.” "You can ignore the facts; you can't deny the facts.” Image FEMA
  55. 55. meets… Then City(state)Inclusive Network PragmaticidealismDistributionCooperationSharing Tra Now NationExclusive Hub PaternalisticidealismConcentrationCorporationShareholdersInvestment Windowona
  56. 56. Delta Coalition - launched at UNISDR Sendai DRR Conference March 2015 The Netherlands, Japan, Colombia, Philippines, Vietnam, Bangladesh, France, Korea, Egypt, Indonesia, Myanmar, Mozambique, …
  57. 57. ↳0. A Strong and Bonding Narrative Change always begins with the development of a strong and bonding narrative, a positive, forward-looking and action-oriented narrative about resilient deltas that binds all stakeholders together, that evokes recognition and that the parties involved jointly propagate: myth is the motor of change. ↳1. A Clear Agenda The Delta Coalition needs a clear, substantial and focused agenda that states what the Delta Coalition will work on in the following years and what the intended outcomes are. Water is a central issue in all urbanizing deltas: water as a big divider as well as a great connector with regard to added value, equity, and prosperity. ↳2. Collaboration Is Key It is essential to create interdisciplinary, multilevel, and cross-sector (multi-stakeholder) alliances between parties such as governments, NGOs, private sector, researchers and designers to connect the local to the (inter)national. 5SUSTAINABLEURBANDELTASCALLFORACTION ↳3. The Delta Coalition as a Broker Often an outside partner is needed to set things in motion, to catalyze a transformation and action. The countries gathered in the Delta Coalition can be each other’s outside partners and use their networks, like the IABR, to create and facilitate opportunities for reform. ↳4. Reinvent Finance The realities of financial institutions and their processes often fail to align with the implementation of innovative and comprehensive projects. Use pilot projects to pave the way to finance, to design innovative financial development models, and to enhance financial mechanisms. ↳5. Make Projects! Good examples are essential. Working on actual projects will inform the agenda and vice versa, creating a continuous feedback loop between ambition and implementation. This will build capacity among all stakeholders and, combined with monitoring and evaluation, increase impact and create opportunities for replication and upscaling. 6SUSTAINABLEURBANDELTASCALLFORACTION We would like to take this opportunity to add an extra point of action, and that is about the need to ↳6. Create Opportunities for Experimentation, Testing, and Presenting. The activities mentioned above need a context from which and in which they can be further developed and shaped. A context for the co-development of new insights and best practices in which there is room for failure – to allow learning-by-doing, and for boldness – to allow leapfrogging. Such a context contributes to the process of collaborative capacity building, and to the transformation of agendas, ambitions and plans into applicable pilot projects and real-world change. Also, the sociocultural role of transparent public discourse and presentation cannot be underestimated: ‘show and tell’ to help inform and commit the world community, and ensure an open and participative trajectory to build capacity and strengthen approaches that fit in with Global Agendas, like the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, the COP21 agreement, the New Urban Agenda, and so on. ↳0. A Strong and Bonding Narrative Change always begins with the development of a strong and bonding narrative, a positive, forward-looking and action-oriented narrative about resilient deltas that binds all stakeholders together, that evokes recognition and that the parties involved jointly propagate: myth is the motor of change. ↳1. A Clear Agenda The Delta Coalition needs a clear, substantial and focused agenda that states what the Delta Coalition will work on in the following years and what the intended outcomes are. Water is a central issue in all urbanizing deltas: water as a big divider as well as a great connector with regard to added value, equity, and prosperity. ↳2. Collaboration Is Key It is essential to create interdisciplinary, multilevel, and cross-sector (multi-stakeholder) alliances between parties such as governments, NGOs, private sector, researchers and designers to connect the local to the (inter)national. about resilient deltas that binds all stakeholders together, that evokes recognition and that the parties involved jointly propagate: myth is the motor of change. ↳1. A Clear Agenda The Delta Coalition needs a clear, substantial and focused agenda that states what the Delta Coalition will work on in the following years and what the intended outcomes are. Water is a central issue in all urbanizing deltas: water as a big divider as well as a great connector with regard to added value, equity, and prosperity. ↳2. Collaboration Is Key It is essential to create interdisciplinary, multilevel, and cross-sector (multi-stakeholder) alliances between parties such as governments, NGOs, private sector, researchers and designers to connect the local to the (inter)national. ↳1. A Clear Agenda The Delta Coalition needs a clear, substantial and focused agenda that states what the Delta Coalition will work on in the following years and what the intended outcomes are. Water is a central issue in all urbanizing deltas: water as a big divider as well as a great connector with regard to added value, equity, and prosperity. ↳2. Collaboration Is Key It is essential to create interdisciplinary, multilevel, and cross-sector (multi-stakeholder) alliances between parties such as governments, NGOs, private sector, researchers and designers to connect the local to the (inter)national. ↳3. The Delta Coalition as a Broker Often an outside partner is needed to set things in motion, to catalyze a transformation and action. The countries gathered in the Delta Coalition can be each other’s outside partners and use their networks, like the IABR, to create and facilitate opportunities for reform. ↳4. Reinvent Finance The realities of financial institutions and their processes often fail to align with the implementation of innovative and comprehensive projects. Use pilot projects to pave the way to finance, to design innovative financial development models, and to enhance financial mechanisms. ↳5. Make Projects! Good examples are essential. Working on actual projects will inform the agenda and vice versa, creating a continuous feedback loop between ambition and implementation. This will build capacity among all stakeholders and, combined with monitoring Delta Coalition can be each other’s outside partners and use their networks, like the IABR, to create and facilitate opportunities for reform. ↳4. Reinvent Finance The realities of financial institutions and their processes often fail to align with the implementation of innovative and comprehensive projects. Use pilot projects to pave the way to finance, to design innovative financial development models, and to enhance financial mechanisms. ↳5. Make Projects! Good examples are essential. Working on actual projects will inform the agenda and vice versa, creating a continuous feedback loop between ambition and implementation. This will build capacity among all stakeholders and, combined with monitoring and evaluation, increase impact and create opportunities for replication and upscaling. ↳4. Reinvent Finance The realities of financial institutions and their processes often fail to align with the implementation of innovative and comprehensive projects. Use pilot projects to pave the way to finance, to design innovative financial development models, and to enhance financial mechanisms. ↳5. Make Projects! Good examples are essential. Working on actual projects will inform the agenda and vice versa, creating a continuous feedback loop between ambition and implementation. This will build capacity among all stakeholders and, combined with monitoring and evaluation, increase impact and create opportunities for replication and upscaling. CALLFORACTION We would like to take this opportunity to add an e action, and that is about the need to ↳6. Create Opportunities for Experimentation, Te Presenting. The activities mentioned above need a which and in which they can be further developed A context for the co-development of new insights in which there is room for failure – to allow learnin for boldness – to allow leapfrogging. Such a contex to the process of collaborative capacity building, a transformation of agendas, ambitions and plans in pilot projects and real-world change. Also, the soc role of transparent public discourse and presentat underestimated: ‘show and tell’ to help inform and community, and ensure an open and participative SUSCALLFORACTION We would like to take this opportunity to add an extra point of action, and that is about the need to ↳6. Create Opportunities for Experimentation, Testing, and Presenting. The activities mentioned above need a context from which and in which they can be further developed and shaped. A context for the co-development of new insights and best practices in which there is room for failure – to allow learning-by-doing, and for boldness – to allow leapfrogging. Such a context contributes to the process of collaborative capacity building, and to the transformation of agendas, ambitions and plans into applicable pilot projects and real-world change. Also, the sociocultural role of transparent public discourse and presentation cannot be underestimated: ‘show and tell’ to help inform and commit the world SCALLFORACTION We would like to take this opport action, and that is about the need ↳6. Create Opportunities for Exp Presenting. The activities mentio which and in which they can be fu A context for the co-developmen in which there is room for failure for boldness – to allow leapfroggi to the process of collaborative ca transformation of agendas, ambit pilot projects and real-world chan role of transparent public discour underestimated: ‘show and tell’ to community, and ensure an open a
  58. 58. COUNTRIES UNITED NATIONS WORLD BANK Australia Mexico Peru South Africa Senegal Tajikistan Jordan Hungary Bangladesh South Korea Netherlands Mauritius NETHERLANDS HUNGARY MEXICO SENEGALI PERU SOUTH AFRICA MAURITIUS AUSTRALIA SOUTH KOREA TAJIKISTAN JORDAN BANGLADESH UNITED NATIONS Mark Rutte Prime Minister of the Netherlands Abdullah Ensour Prime Minister of Jordan Jim Yong Kim President, World Bank Group Ban Ki-moon Secretary General, United Nations Enrique Peña Nieto President of Mexico (Co-Chair) Manuel Pulgar-Vidal Minister of State for the Environment of Peru (Special Advisor) Macky Sall President of Senegal Ameenah Gurib President of Mauritius (Co-Chair) Emomali Rahmon President of Tajikistan Han Seung-soo Former Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea (Special Advisor) Jacob Zuma President of South Africa János Áder President of Hungary Malcolm Turnbull Prime Minister of Australia Sheikh Hasina Prime Minister of Bangladesh
  59. 59. Action Plan This Action Plan is a living document and Panel members expect to update it over the life of the Panel September 21st , 2016 HIGH LEVEL PANEL ON WATER WATER DATA VALUING WATER WATER GOVERNANCE Resilient Economies and Societies & Disaster Risk Reduction Water and the Environment Sustainable Cities and Human Settlements Catalyzing Change, Building Partnerships & International Cooperation Universal Access to Safe Water and Sanitation Water Infrastructure and Investment
  60. 60. Then City(state)Inclusive Network PragmaticidealismDistributionCooperationSharing Tra Now NationExclusive Hub PaternalisticidealismConcentrationCorporationShareholdersInvestment Windowona This transformative approach can help influence the way the world deals with future’s uncertainties…
  61. 61. COMPLEX SITUATION ASSESS PROBLEM FORM GOVERNMENT TASK FORCE IDENTIFY PHILANTHROPIC FUNDING SELECT PARTNERS CALL FOR TALENT BUILD RESEARCH ADVISORY GROUP FUNDINGANNOUNCED FINALPUBLICEXHIBITION SELECT TALENT WORK WITH GOVERNMENT PARTNERS FORM WORKING GROUPS & SHARE KNOWLEDGE INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & INVESTIGATIONS LECTURES, SITE VISITS, WORKSHOPS CRITIQUE DESIGNS COMMUNITY OUTREACH COMPILE RESEARCH REPORT DESIGN PROPOSAL SELECTION PUBLIC EXHIBITION OF IDEAS ROUNDTABLES DESIGN REFINEMENT COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS PUBLIC EVENTS TEST AND DESIGN APPROACHES ANALYZE STAKEHOLDERS BUILD COALITIONS FUNDING ALLOCATED ON GOING ENGAGEMENT DESIGN REFINEMENT BEGIN CONSTRUCTION The Task Force and their core group of advisors and staff created a unique structure for the competition. A series of stages was established that would orient the design process around in-depth research, cross-sector and cross-professional collaboration, and iterative design development. The design process incorporated a variety of inputs to ensure that each stage’s deliverables were based on the best knowledge and talent, and that the final proposals would be replicable, regional, and implementable. Objective Gather the talent of the world to work with the talent of the Sandy-affected region. Process The Task Force issues a Request for Qualifications calling for teams to assemble themselves in interdisciplinary partnerships to tackle the region’s physical and social vulnerabilities. To incentivize participation, the federal government pledges funding to implement the winning designs while private philanthropy pledges prize money for competitors. Result Ten finalist design teams are selected comprising a diverse and complementary skill sets and approaches. Objective Establish the broadest possible understanding of the region’s vulnerabilities to climate events to enhance resilience. Process Rebuild by Design’s local partner organizations create an intensive, three-month program of field research to introduce teams to a variety of local stakeholders, providing a comprehensive view of the storm’s effects—the damage it created as well as the longstanding problems it uncovered or exacer- bated. A Research Advisory Board leads the teams through the region to learn from a variety of perspec- tives, and teams conduct additional research to supplement this on-the-ground work. Research is collaborative across teams and focuses on typologies as well as locations. Result A research report and public presentation from each team that includes three to five “design opportunities” describing concep- tual approaches for interventions. Objective Develop implementable solutions that have support from local communities and governments. Process A jury selects approximately one design opportunity for each team to fully develop. Teams then gather diverse local stakeholders into community coalitions, with whom they begin a four-month process of co-designing the final intervention. Using meetings, colloquia, charettes, and non-traditional events to gain the broadest perspectives, they create solutions than address not only disaster scenarios, but enrich the daily life of community members. Result Ten fully developed, imple- mentable resilience proposals that champion communities’ visions for future development, and have support from the community and the backing of local governments. Objective Governments and community stakeholders work together to build the projects. Process HUD transfers disaster recovery funds to City and State Governments to implement the first stages of the winning designs. Teams work with them to further refine the interventions and proceed with permits and environmental impact assessments leading to construction. HUD sets strong guidelines for community involvement to ensure that the coalitions formed during the competition continue to be involved through implementation. Result A more resilient region achieved through collaboration and design. TALENT DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH 1 3 4 2 1 Designing a Process A DETOUR TO TEST AND LEAPFROG
  62. 62. Dutch River Region 4 million Rural Just above EUR 2.3 billion Extremely high water levels. That is the greatest challenge the river region in the Netherlands faces today. In 1993 and 1995, water levels in the Netherlands reached a critical level, weakening the dikes to the point of collapse. A quarter of a million inhabitants had to be evacuated, along with one million cattle. As heavy rainfall is becoming more common – and will become even more so in the future – the Dutch government is continually working on ensuring the safety of the river regions through programmes such as Room for the River. Reinforcing dikes is not an adequate solution. In order to drain excess water into the sea, measures must also include widening and deepening rivers. At more than 30 locations, the Room for the River Programme allows rivers more space, for example by moving dikes, digging secondary channels and deepening flood plains. The Room for the River Programme uses a globally innovative approach to protect areas against river flooding. Giving the river more room not only protects the river regions from floods but also improves the overall quality of the area, with new nature and recreational areas as an added bonus. In short, an integrated approach improves both safety and spatial quality. Multiple Dutch partners including central government, and local provinces, municipalities and water boards, companies and NGOs are implementing the Room for the River Programme. This close cooperation between national and regional governments ensures support and reduces the risk of delays. Room for the River is a pilot programme for the Dutch Delta Programme, which is designed to prepare the Netherlands for extreme natural events. The main objective of this programme is to make water safety and freshwater supplies sustainable and predictable by 2050. The Dutch Delta approach is based on five Ds: Delta Act, Delta Fund, Delta Commissioner, Delta Decisions and Delta Programme. The so-called Delta Decisions, for example guide the concrete approach to the Rhine- Meuse delta with regard to water storage and drainage, and the need for new dams or dikes. www.ruimtevoorderivier.nl/english THE NETHERLANDS ROOM FOR THE RIVER Integrated approach governance and cooperatIon wIth stakeholders 12 Global impact
  63. 63. Bangladesh Delta 155 million Rural, with several rapidly urbanising cities Just above EUR 7.65 million Bangladesh, encompassing the Ganges-Brahmaputra- Meghna river systems, can in many respects be considered one of the most dynamic deltas in the world. Huge amounts of water and sediment often exceed the carrying capacity of Bangladesh’ rivers. Cyclones and coastal floods, intensified by climate change effects, and a range of socio-economic trends, pose additional challenges. The Bangladesh Delta Plan 2100 (BDP2100) attempts to address these issues by developing a long term, holistic delta vision and adaptive strategy. Amongst socio-economic trends are a rapidly increasing population and a growing demand for food. The already high pressure on available land adds to the complexity of water-related problems in the Bangladesh Delta, which all need to be addressed in order to support sustainable living conditions and continued economic growth. The Bangladesh Delta Plan aims to deliver an umbrella development vision, strategy and implementation plan that can act as a frame of reference for new governmental policy, thereby supporting the integration of existing sectoral development plans. At the same time it aims to provide anchorage for numerous on-going projects and no-regret measures to delta challenges in the short term. A range of stakeholders is involved in an interactive manner, ensuring the necessary institutional support for the development and implementation of the programme. BDP2100 links with the Five Year investment plans, which are coordinated by the Government of Bangladesh. Importantly, the Bangladesh Delta Plan will build on insights from the Dutch Delta Programme and the Mekong Delta Plan. www.bandudeltas.org BANGLADESH INTEGRATED DELTA PLANNING long-term approach vs. short-term measures cooperatIon wIth other government levels and stakeholders Integrated approach 13 Global impact
  64. 64. Nile Delta 10 million Urban and rural Just above EUR 2.4 million The Nile delta is heavily populated, with up to 1,600 inhabitants per square kilometre. The Nile delta coastal zone encompasses more than 40% of Egypt’s industries and hosts vital centres for tourism, agriculture and fish farms. By the year 2075, a coastal area of about 500 km2 will be vulnerable to flooding. The sandy barrier, separating the inland lakes from the sea, is very narrow and low lying, presently subject to strong erosion. A UNDP report on climate change impacts estimates that hundreds of billions of Egyptian pounds, about 2 to 6% of future gross domestic product, could be lost from effects of climate change on water resources, agriculture, coastal resources and tourism. Thousands could die from air pollution and heat stress. Millions could lose jobs in agriculture as the result of climate change. In a middle scenario of sea-level rise, about 40 km2 of agricultural land will be lost by the year 2060. The Egyptian-Dutch High Level Water Panel, established 38 years ago, addresses these very urgent coastal zone challenges. Dialogues, knowledge exchange sessions and preparatory studies led to a public procurement for the development of an Integrated Coastal Zone Management strategy (ICZM) and a shoreline management plan for the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast from the Libyan border to the Gaza border. It should recognise, incorporate and address the concerns of all stakeholders through a well-defined and structured participatory approach. Next to the tremendous natural challenges there are also a number of institutional and legal challenges. The institutional framework for addressing responsibilities in Egypt is complex and sometimes unclear. Cooperation among agencies is limited. The ICZM strategy must incorporate all required legislative and institutional changes that would facilitate the adoption, buy- in, and seamless development and implementation. The project, with a total budget of EUR 2.4 million, will be funded by Europeaid and should start by the end of 2014 and be finished within 30 months. EGYPT NILE DELTA NEEDS A SHORELINE MASTER fInance and ImplementatIon Integrated approach legIslatIon and depolItIsatIon governance and cooperatIon wIth stakeholders 15 Global impact
  65. 65. Ayeyarwady Delta 6.6 million +3 m Rural The Ayeyarwady Delta in Myanmar is extremely fertile. The area, which is plagued by floods, salinity and erosion, can play an important role in the economic development of this Southeast Asian country. The first step is to assess the vulnerabilities and, in particular, the resilience of the delta. At about three metres above sea level, the delta’s sediment plays a dominant role in the large-scale cultivation of rice. The delta region is densely populated and is dotted with fishing communities in villages and market towns, mostly located along the rivers and streams. That is why the destruction caused by Cyclone Nargis in May 2008 was so catastrophic, causing nearly 140 thousand casualties and severe economic damage. Myanmar has asked the Netherlands to take the lead in drawing up an adaptive, integrated water management plan for both the delta and the rest of the country to cope with Myanmar’s expected huge economic growth and increasing pressure on water resources as a result of this. Delta Alliance Partners Deltares and Alterra are conducting a Vulnerability and Resilience Assessment Ayeyarwady Delta study, which is financed by the Global Water Partnership (GWP) and Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME). The Ayeyarwady Delta is currently still, for the most part, underdeveloped. Uncoordinated exploitation of its resources in some areas may pose serious threats to the health of the delta. Effective, cross-sectoral management of the water system, in which local stakeholders are involved, will lead to sustainable solutions in the long term. The list of problems may seem long: Mangroves are cut down for fuel, there is overfishing, river bank erosion and deterioration of water quality as a result of salinisation. However, by applying Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), the delta can be used by the local people without compromising the integrity of these systems or overexploiting their natural resources. MYANMAR MAKING USE OF THE RESILIENCE OF THE DELTA Integrated approach sustaInabIlIty, flexIbIlIty, solIdarIty supported analysIs 17 Global impact
  66. 66. Beira 0.6 million Urban Just above Approx. EUR 2 million Beira and Rotterdam: two low-lying cities in densely populated deltas with ports serving a massive hinterland. People keep flocking to Mozambique’s seaport and settling in low-lying areas that are not fit for habitation. Waterborne diseases, especially malaria, are rampant and the city’s infant mortality rate is dramatically high. What can Beira learn from its Dutch counterpart? Focusing solely on water safety and water supply in these neighbourhoods means you are only addressing part of the problem. In addition to water safety, the integrated approach of the Beira Master Plan 2035, which has been commissioned by the Beira Municipality and drawn up in consultation with all stakeholders in the city, aims to stimulate both land development and economic growth. One important insight and result gained during the development process of the Beira Master Plan is the need for a public- private Land Development Company (LDC). A company responsible for site preparation and for allocating suitable parcels of land for housing and business purposes. The Beira Municipality drew up the master plan in association with a Dutch consortium, aided by funding from the Dutch Global Water programme. The establishment of the LDC, again with help from the Netherlands, is currently underway. The next step is preparing land development business cases aimed at generating concrete investment projects. At the request of the Beira Municipality, Dutch experts will remain actively involved. Detailed financial engineering and the inclusion of crucial development partners will be the next step after that. MOZAMBIQUE A MASTER PLAN FOR BEIRA Integrated approach, fInance and ImplementatIon cooperatIon wIth other government levels and stakeholders 18 Global impact
  67. 67. Vistula and Oder Delta 2 million Urban and rural -1.8 m to +2.5 m Poland is a country of water, although it does not have a reputation as such. Almost all major Polish cities are located by the sea or a river and are directly influenced by water. Sometimes, as is the case with the Vistula and Oder Rivers, which run from the mountains in the south to the Baltic Sea and the low- lying, flat deltas in the north, the influence of water is too great. The one-dimensional river system set up in the past is highly susceptible to flooding. In the last century, various Polish rivers were canalised and subsequently poorly maintained. Water management was considered an architectural problem, with concrete as the solution. Little attention was paid to the natural behaviour of rivers, resulting today in flooding problems causing annual flood damages of up to EUR 3 billion in 2010 alone. In addition, cities such as Warsaw and Cracow are unable to exploit the social, economic and ecological potential of their rivers to the full. Awareness that things can and must change is gaining ground in Poland, which is also being affected by climate change. Economically, the Central European country is doing well. Poland is reaping the fruits of EU membership, also in terms of knowledge exchange. There are valuable lessons to be learned from the Netherlands and the Dutch Delta Programme in terms of its holistic, integrated approach to spatial planning and water management. In the coming years, aided by Dutch knowledge and innovation and European funding, efforts will focus on ensuring water safety in the form of infrastructure, retention and limiting building in areas susceptible to flooding. This alternative approach will make room for nature while creating opportunities for tourism, recreation and nature development, both in flood plains and on city shores. POLAND WATER KNOWLEDGE HAS ECONOMIC POTENTIAL Integrated approach cooperatIon wIth other government levels and stakeholders fInance and ImplementatIon 19 Global impact
  68. 68. Mekong Delta 17 million (expected shrink to 15 or growth to 30 million) Urbanisation 28% Greater parts + 1.5 m In the past decades, the Mekong Delta, with its rich land and water resources, successfully developed into the granary of the country and turned Vietnam into one of the leading rice exporters globally. On the other hand, the economic development of the delta lags behind other regions in the country. In its present state, the Mekong Delta is very vulnerable. Floods, droughts and salinity are dominant problems, hampering a prosperous and sustained economic development. Inspired by the experiences in the Netherlands, the Government of Vietnam expressed the strong intention to work towards a Mekong Delta Plan for a safe, prosperous and both economically and environmentally sustainable development of the delta. It presents a vision to use the comparative advantages of the delta and focus on agro-business industrialisation. Organisation of the agricultural producers enables a better position to reduce transaction costs, platforms for more sustainable land and water resources management, improvement of product quality and competitiveness. Diversification over the provinces is necessary to adapt as much as possible to available land and water resources. Important examples are a saline coastal zone with room for aquaculture integrated with mangrove restoration and in the upper delta controlled flooding with water retention and fish farming in the flood season instead of a third rice crop. Still, large-scale measures to guarantee flood protection and fresh water availability may be required when climate change causes persisting sea level rise and droughts. The plan offers an assessment framework for government, donors and international financial institutions for moving from planning to implementation. The plan enjoys broad support – from the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the United Nations and countries such as Australia and Germany. VIETNAM MEKONG DELTA PLAN: LONG-TERM VISION AND STRATEGY Integrated approach sustaInabIlIty, flexIbIlIty, solIdarIty supported analysIs cooperatIon wIth other government levels and stakeholders 20 Global impact
  69. 69. Upper valley of the Cauca River 4,5 million Rural and urban +1,000 to +1,200 m Approx. EUR 2.5 million Inundation in the Cauca Valley has caused major socio- economic damage. As the valley is an important agricultural region representing the heart of Colombia’s sugarcane industry, flooding also affects Colombia’s national economy. The challenge is to limit the risk of flooding from the river and tackle the problem of insufficient drainage while paying sufficient attention to river ecology recovery. This requires balancing the interests of a large number of stakeholders. Due to the flat nature of the Cauca Valley, the area suffers from fre- quent flooding, the last of which occurred in 2011. The ministry, the local councils and the farmers own- ing land adjacent to the river are all responsible for flood safety, which makes the process of reaching agreements far from easy. The economic interests of the sugarcane farmers are great. To strike the right balance between the desired level of safety and a healthy river ecosystem it is vital that all stakeholders participate in the development and implemen- tation of a flood risk management plan. The Regional Autonomous Corpora- tion of the Cauca Valley (CVC) plays a central role in this initiative. With support from a Dutch consortium, CVC experts analyse present water safety levels and assess the effects of potential measures. They draw up a master plan using the experience from the Dutch Room for the River Programme. This includes an active participation of stakeholders and an integrated approach. Dutch experience has shown that stakeholders need to be involved in an active and timely manner. It is important to provide the right level of detail during the develop- ment process, moving from general concepts to concrete actions. Ulti- mately, the individual landowners and local councils are responsible for the implementation of structural or physical measures. The CVC can assist in the implementation of non- structural measures such as subsidy programmes, training programmes, regulation and enforcement. The project also includes searching for funding from external sources, such as the World Bank or the Inter- American Development Bank. COLOMBIA BALANCING INTERESTS AROUND THE CAUCA RIVER Integrated approach cooperatIon wIth other government levels and stakeholders fInance and ImplementatIon supported analysIs 21 Global impact
  70. 70. North East region USA NYC 9.5 million, New Jersey 8.8 million Urban 2.5 metres (lowest point NYC) USD 930 million Hurricane Sandy painfully clarified the implications of climate change for the north-eastern region of the United States, exposing the vulnerabilities of the area. Since then the affected region has not just been rebuilt, but solutions are being sought that are in line with the natural and socio-economic characteristics of the region. Not a plan, but a culture change. In the autumn of 2012, 650,000 homes and hundreds of thousands of companies in the largest metropolis of the nation were damaged or destroyed. In response, President Obama appointed the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force in order to deliver aid, help and respond effectively and coordinate the rebuilding of the New York – New Jersey region. To become more resilient to climate change the Sandy Task Force, together with philanthropy, set up an ambitious project: Rebuild By Design (RBD). After Hurricane Sandy revealed alarming infrastructural, environmental and social vulnerabilities, RBD assembled 10 teams (out of 148) of architects, engineers, planners and environmental scientists to undertake a regional research-intensive design process, identifying environmental concerns and developing strategies that will have a significant impact on the region and its communities. RBD is positioned not just to rebuild after the storm, but also to design a more sustainable and resilient region over the long term. The designs combine innovation and regional strategy with location- specific, customised solutions. Each design team is made up of a coalition of local stakeholders including government officials, entrepreneurs, residents, researchers, NGOs and other organisations. This level of cooperation is unprecedented and has a strong Dutch flavour. The same is true for the innovative designs – with members in six out of 10 teams, the Dutch are well represented here, too. The winning Rebuild by Design projects were announced in June 2014. The city of New York and the states of New York and New Jersey are responsible for implementation of the projects. An initial billion dollars of federal funding has been received for the realisation of the six projects. www.rebuildbydesign.org Integrated approach InnovatIon fInance and ImplementatIon supported analysIs NEW YORK (USA) REBUILD BY DESIGN AFTER HURRICANE SANDY 16 Global impact
  71. 71. 77 5 YEARS TO CHANGE THE CURVES… What comes next is the massive task to undo these failing actions, mitigate their origins, adapt for their impacts and rethink the future and our responsibilities.
  72. 72. water a global approach not about making a plan but about changing the culture
  73. 73. 79

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