Update on ebooks for FE

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RSC Eastern webinar 2nd October 2009 presentation by Anna Vernon of JISC Collections

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  • My name is Anna Vernon. I’ve done some research and you should all be signed up and using the collection. I’m going to give an overview of the project and then I’ll be speaking about promotion and discovery of e-resource.s Later today, i’ll hand over to you to look at your barriers to using e-resources, and your comments and recommendations will be feedback to ebrary JISC, LSC. Throughout the talk I will be reffering to the findings from the HE observatory project which made 36 ebooks freely available for 2 years. The data from the e-books servers has been analysed to provide us with real time evidence on how students actually use e-books, in addition we carried out a series of surveys and case studies. As a result we’ve got a amazing amount of knowledge about our users and how they discover and use e-books that can be put into practice..
  • This project although it has the word e-books in the titles is not about technology, its about taking library stuff out of the library and into places where students and teachers can use it. Many of the titles within the collection are available for the first time as an eBook, however it is not a ‘library thing’ There’s been alot the media on the use of e-books. However, all this is of no importance to the most important person, your user. In the eyes of your users its just another collection of online stuff. and it doesn’t matter to them that we paid 1.8 million pounds for the collection, nor should it. If your resources are not promoted, they might think that they’re freely available on the open web or even worse, they’ll never find it. The collection needs to be signposted and promoted so that your users can find and use this ‘stuff’ this appies to all your resources not just the e-books and don’t just take the first thing they find from Google There are numerous ways of discovering and accessing e-books Ideal opportunity to raise the profile of your library and to extend the variety of places where your students can learn, but teachers, IT and library staff need to work together because quality assured, your e-stuff essentially has to compete with Google. Library users inhabit a world of fantastic choice on the open web, and are hungry for digital content.
  • LSC and JISC funded project As a result 2990 books are now freely available to all UK FE colleges. If each library had to buy 1 copy of these e-books, in print, the cost for each institution would be £116k Access is for 5 years, FREE of charge By providing FE colleges with a critical mass of relevant e-books we aim to help colleges serve their diverse community of learners. Unlimited, simultaneous user access means that unlike the print world a book will never be out of stock and students have access to a digital library 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This provides clear benefits for distance learners, part time students or people who simply prefer not to go to the campus to read material. Many of the titles are available for the first time as an ebook The illustration here is a doric Column created by the artist Tom Bendtsen made from 3000 books, all related to western history. You’ll be relieved be hear that titles don’t just cover western history the from a variety of subjects as diverse as Fashion Design ,Software Engineering, Heath and Social Care Beauty Therapy right through to Practical Lambing.
  • Through the project, titles like these (show textbook) are available to every FE student, and teacher in the UK. We ran a Community Consultation, and I would like to thank (and apologise) to those of you who responded, It was an immense list of titles, any consultation-I had to analyse all these results from the we received 80,000 individual ‘votes’, Phenomenal response from the community, much more than we anticipated. And this wealth of data meant that we were able to use the consultation results of the with little or no manipulation, so that you just get the titles you asked for. Unsurprisingly we received significantly more interest in vocational subjects. We also included h igh cost titles and titles of relevance to smaller and specialist colleges, e.g Practical Lambing.There is also a collection of titles funded by the JISC of relevance to Scotland, Northern ireland and Wales. If the titles were not ranked by the community then they are not included It is a significant amount of funding and the largest project of its kind.
  • One of the main attractions of e-books is that they can be accessed 24 HOURS A DAY /7 DAYS A WEEK giving your students the flexibility to access resources anyplace, anytime and anywhere. Another benefit of e-books, to me at least is their portablity. If this were an e-book (point to book) I wouldn’t have to carry it all around Glasgow for the next two days. Device independent-access via PC’s, mobile devices, or wherever you have internet access. Access to the e-books for FE collection is online only so you cannot download the entire book to an book reader or save to USB. Personalisation-users can comment on, ‘tag’ link to other resources. Jennifer will be speaking about their experiences at Glasgow Met. When I spoke to the head of business Ealing, Hammersmith and West London College to talk about their experiences, there was a 3 day tube strike. In spite of this, his part time students, were still able to complete their coursework. via their VLE using their online resources,inc. e-books. They currently use the Dawson platform, and they feel that e-books have increased the flexibility of its course provision and delivery. They even went so far to say that e-books improved their research skills, information literacy skills and levels of attainment.
  • Demonstration
  • These are some great images from the New York Public Library’s archive, promoting their mobile unit. e-books can have disproportionate benefits for learners with disabilities and students working from home People with a range of access needs can find traditional text books difficult. Literacy issues might affect people with low reading ages, people working in a second language or people with specific learning difficulties, ie dyslexia. Books may be physically difficult to manipulate for some users and for others the text size and contrast will present barriers. E-Books may allow users to: personalise the text size and colour have the text read aloud by text to speechinstant access to referencing tools or mind mapping softwarecopy/paste text into notes, reducing the physical demand of typing. JISC TechDis has a fantastic range of resources to enable staff to create effective, engaging and accessible learning materials for their learners. Alistair Mc Naught from TechDIs has created a short video clip on the ebrary platform and its accessiblity features and workarounds. Short video clip on e-books/inclusion - http://tinyurl.com/ebookvideo
  • You can access the collection via several different modes of authentication. As a user of e-stuff I only want to sign in once. By using Access Management compliant technologies you can manage access to resources on a granular level, e.g if you want to make the distinction between your HE students or part time students to personalise their experience of the library/VLE. By implementing federated access management well, your users need only remember one username and password. Joining the Federation and deploying Shibboleth is free but does require IT resource. I do not want to railroad any instituion into doing anything but do get in touch if you want to enable your users to have single sign in to resources. In addition we can offer IT staff Netskills training on Shibboleth,
  • In today’s impatient two-click culture, users will gravitate towards the open web if libraries or publishers place unnecessary barriers in their way. The library catalogue is the main route for discovery for e-book content, it is essential that accurate metadata MARC records is supplied with e-books and that it is imported. There was a noticeable confusion by students in most focus groups over means of access: in particular the library web pages, the library catalogue and federated searching. We need to offer a clearer route to content. Students also showed little real understanding of the distinction between the e-resources provided through their own institution or via the open web. Libraries need to consider how they develop and brand e‐collections in ways that fit with the users expectations-how they use the internet. This isn’t just an issue for FE, but as education provison gets more commerically focussed and competitve, we should get better at promoting what we do best. Until discovery methods and e-book platforms become really intuitive, librarians will need to continue to provide training to their users. There is so much e-content, and a multiplicity of ways to get to it and users often don’t know how to get to what they want nor do they have the skills to know what they are looking for. Libraries have a big challenge in providing clear access routes to e-content. Discovery needs to be made a simple as possible so that user’s do not perceive the library as having ‘empty shelves’ or think that the content you (or we’ve’ spend so much time or money on isn’t freely available on the open web.
  • Active promotion leads to higher use of your e-stuff. Higher use means happy student and greater retention Data suggests that students spend fall longer reading an e-book when directed through a VLE, which would suggest that they are making better use of an e-book However the successful incorporation of e‐books into VLEs requires promotion,and effort in inputting the links etc. and greater dialogue between librarians and teaching staff to let them know what’s available and what they can do with the e-books. Some ideas to get you started, again the findings came from the HE project, what worked/what didn’t with the promotion of the 236 textbooks within the project. Get in touch with ebrary as you can incorporate your logo, branding etc into the site. You can even send them some html. Sell your services! Social networking applications Subject specific bookmarks advertising e‐books, putting stickers on the hard copy Dummy books on the shelf to prompt users when all the print copies were on loan. Coffee and croissant mornings Video exemplars Most popular title lists, send selection of titles to teaching/VLE staff Wobblers Quick start guides The library website/catalogue is the most effective way to inform users about the existence of e‐books, but this needs to be backed up with high quality catalogue entries and by engaging students through their tutors and, especially, though library induction sessions.
  • The project is funded for five years, but the objective is sustainability. This will involve helping you to grow your collections of e-books. You can download and view the usage statistics for your collegeJISC Collections will monitor the usage of the e-books, looking at trends across colleges, discipline areas, and titles. e-select framework agreement In addition to the centrally purchased collections, you will be able to locally purchase additional e-book titles through the e-select framework agreement, including newer editions. As from July the e-books titles were the most recent editions, but due to the nature of the titles selected, the most relevant titles have a limited shelf life. Assessors from FE colleges will evaluate the e-books submitted using the following criteria:Relevance to qualifications taken in FEDemonstrable discounts for FE colleges Opportunity for us to get the e-stuff the sector needs and go beyond providing unmanipulable print handouts to creating a dynamic environment where students can personalise, archive, tag annotate and share content.
  • We’re not quite there yet. There are significant gaps between that titles that colleges need and what publishers and aggregators are offering.e-books are not cheap, especially when you take into consideration that they are currently used as ‘back‐up’ copies or to ease the pressure on libraries print collections. We will continue to negotiate with publishers so that the titles you need are made available as e-books. FE Business models study We know very little about student purchasing behaviour of textbooks in either print or electronic form in FE nor how willing FE students would be willing to pay for chapters or whole e-books JISC Collections has commissioned John Cox associates to evaluate a range of business models including student purchase. They will be in touch in the next month or so to ask you to complete a survey . This is really important as its unlikely that any college will be able to afford all the e-books required for students to support their studies. More titles Good news, JISC has provided funding of 200k for JISC Collections to acquire additional e-books. As with the current collection, they will be free of charge. I will be running evaluation workshops around the country in November including Scotland so if you would liek to be involved in chossing the next set of titles, please let me know.
  • Update on ebooks for FE

    1. 1. e-books for FE: a digital library for FE colleges <ul><li>RSC Eastern </li></ul>
    2. 2. This is not technology <ul><li>The term e-book is already defunct, in the eyes of your users its just another collection of online stuff. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s the content that matters, and what you do with it.... </li></ul><ul><li>Many of the titles within the collection are available for the first time as an e-book </li></ul><ul><li>However the collection needs to be signposted and promoted so that your users can find and use this ‘stuff’ </li></ul><ul><li>There are numerous ways of discovering and accessing e-books </li></ul><ul><li>Ideal opportunity to raise the profile </li></ul><ul><li>of your department/ and extend the </li></ul><ul><li>variety of places where your students </li></ul><ul><li>can learn, but teachers, VLE administrators, </li></ul><ul><li>IT and library staff need to work together. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Recent headlines on e-books </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    3. 3. e-books for FE Background to the Project <ul><li>LSC and JISC funded project </li></ul><ul><li>As a result 2990 e-books are now freely available to all UK FE colleges. If each library had to buy 1 copy of the FE e-books, in print, the cost for each institution would be £116,879.10. </li></ul><ul><li>Access is for 5 years, FREE of charge </li></ul><ul><li>By providing FE colleges with a critical mass of relevant e-books we aim to help colleges serve their diverse community of learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Unlimited, simultaneous user access means that unlike the print world means all students have access to a digital library 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This provides clear benefits for distance learners, part time students or people who simply prefer not to go to the campus to read material. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of the titles are available for the first time as an ebook </li></ul>Doric Column in a contemporary art installation made from 3000 books, all related to western history, Tom Bendtsen
    4. 4. The titles in the project Background to the project <ul><li>The FE community evaluated the titles received and around 80,000 votes were cast. If the titles were not ranked by the community then they were not included in the project. Clear demand for vocational and skills based textbook titles </li></ul><ul><li>Catered for smaller and specialist colleges </li></ul><ul><li>This project represents a significant amount of capital funding and is the largest project of its kind </li></ul><ul><li>Access is provided through the ebrary e-books platform under the terms of the JISC model licence. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Benefits of ebooks Extending access to your library <ul><ul><li>Librarians identified the key factors driving interest in e-books as follows: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>24/7 access: the flexibility to access resources anyplace, anytime and anywhere </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remote access has clear benefits for distance learners, part time students or people who simply prefer not to go to the campus to read material. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Device independent-access via PC and mobile devices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personalisation-users can comment on, ‘tag’ & link to other resources. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Space saving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Solution to managing short loan collections (including problems of theft and vandalism) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They address periods of peak demand by providing concurrent access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They offer functionality not found in hard copy, including search, and cut-and-paste with automatic citation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefits at Ealing, Hammersmith and West London college: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced analytical and research skills </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overcoming the barriers of limited books </li></ul><ul><li>More self-directive learning </li></ul><ul><li>More in depth research integrated into assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced achievement. </li></ul>Ealing, Hammersmith and West London college by jisc_infonet 3000 books by Mike Moran
    6. 6. What you can do with this e-stuff
    7. 7. Search inside & i nformation retrieval
    8. 8. Automatic citation information
    9. 9. Extending access to all Why are e-books important for inclusion? <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>e-books can have disproportionate benefits for learners with disabilities and students working from home </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People with a range of access needs find traditional text books difficult. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy issues might affect people with low reading ages, people working in a second language or people with specific learning difficulties. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Books may be physically difficult to manipulate for some users and for others the text size and contrast will present barriers. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E-Books may allow users to: </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>personalise the text size and colour </li></ul><ul><li>have the text read aloud by text to speech </li></ul><ul><li>instant access to referencing tools </li></ul><ul><li>copy/paste text into notes, reducing the physical demand of typing. </li></ul><ul><li>JISC TechDis has a number of resources to enable staff to create effective, engaging and accessible learning materials for their learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Short video clip on e-books/inclusion - http://tinyurl.com/ebookvideo </li></ul>Some People Can't Go to Libraries. ... from New York Public Library Work with schools : after a book...from New York Public Library
    10. 10. Barriers...
    11. 11. The user perspective Responding to user expectations <ul><li>In today’s impatient two-click culture, users will gravitate towards the open web if their college or publishers place unnecessary barriers in their way. </li></ul><ul><li>Libraries, IT staff and publishers need to work together to make e-books easily discoverable. </li></ul><ul><li>The library catalogue and VLE are the main routes for discovery for library e-book content, it is essential that accurate metadata MARC records is supplied with e-books and that it is imported. </li></ul><ul><li>There was noticeable confusion by students in focus groups over means of access: in particular confusion between library web pages, the library catalogue and federated searching. </li></ul><ul><li>Libraries need to offer a clearer route to content. Students also showed little real understanding of the distinction between the e-resources provided through their own institution or via the open web. </li></ul><ul><li>Until discovery methods and e-book platforms become really intuitive, colleges will need to continue to provide training to their users. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a multiplicity of e-content, and a multiplicity of ways to get to it and users don’t know how to get to what they want. Libraries have a big challenge in providing clear access routes to e-content. Discovery needs to be made a simple as possible. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Promoting and embedding e-stuff Key findings from the HE observatory Project: <ul><li>Active promotion leads to higher use. Higher use means happy students, esp. part time students. </li></ul><ul><li>However the successful incorporation of e‐books into VLEs requires promotion, initial effort in inputting the links etc. and greater dialogue between librarians and teaching staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Get in touch with ebrary to incorporate your logo, branding etc into the site. Sell your services! </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking applications </li></ul><ul><li>Subject specific bookmarks advertising e‐books, putting stickers on the hard copy </li></ul><ul><li>Dummy books on the shelf to prompt users when all the print copies were on loan. </li></ul><ul><li>Coffee and croissants mornings </li></ul><ul><li>Video exemplars </li></ul><ul><li>Most popular title lists, titles to your colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Wobblers </li></ul><ul><li>Quick start guides </li></ul>If you have used e-books from your university library how did you first find out about them? Colleges need to develop a strategy for raising awareness of all types of e-books and developing academic literacy. Teaching staff should also be encouraged to engage more actively in pointing out to students the range of high quality free and paid for e-book content that is available.
    13. 13. Helping colleges build their collections of e-books e-select framework agreement <ul><li>The project is funded for five years, but the objective is sustainability. This will involve helping FE colleges to grow their collections of e-books. </li></ul><ul><li>You can download and view the usage statistics for your college </li></ul><ul><li>From September JISC Collections will monitor the usage of the e-books, looking at trends across colleges, discipline areas, and titles. </li></ul><ul><li>e-select framework agreement </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to the centrally purchased collections, colleges will be able to locally purchase additional e-book titles through the e-select framework agreement, including newer editions. </li></ul><ul><li>Assessors from FE colleges will evaluate and rank the e-books submitted for inclusion on the following criteria: </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance to qualifications taken in FE </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrable discounts for FE colleges </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for us to shape the provision of e-resources and to go beyond providing handouts to creating a dynamic environment where students can personalise, archive, tag annotate and share content. </li></ul>
    14. 14. What next? Meeting the demand for e-books <ul><li>There are significant gaps between what colleges need and what publishers and aggregators are offering. </li></ul><ul><li>e-books are not cheap, especially when they are currently used as ‘back‐up’ copies or to ease the pressure on the print collection. </li></ul><ul><li>We will continue to negotiate with publishers so that the titles the community needs are made available as e-books. </li></ul><ul><li>FE Business models study </li></ul><ul><li>We know very little about student purchasing behaviour of textbooks in either print or electronic form nor how willing FE students would be willing to pay for chapter/e-books JISC Collections has commissioned John Cox associates evaluate a range of business models including student purchase. </li></ul><ul><li>More titles </li></ul><ul><li>Good news, JISC has provided funding of 200k to acquire an additional collection of e-books to the collection. As with the current collection, they will be free of charge from May . </li></ul>

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