Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Mobile Web
Accessibility
Marco Maertens @marcomaertens
EvoHaX Accessibility Hackathon Philly Tech Week 2015
April 17, 2015
2
Mobile Accessibility?
• There is no mobile Web. Just one Web
• Is there mobile accessibility?
• Large overlap between mo...
3
What Are Some Mobile Accessibility Differences?
• Touchscreen
• Screen size
• Easily adjustable orientation
• Use contex...
4
What is (W3C WAI) WCAG?
• An effort of the W3C
• Focused on Web accessibility
• Standards set by wide consultation
(worl...
5
WCAG 2.0 Mobile Accessibility Mapping document
• A draft. Did a mention it’s a draft?
• Not a change to WCAG 2.0.
• Appl...
6
Perceivable
• Minimizing content
• Sufficient size (targets, fonts) to avoid
unnecessary zoom
• Zoom/magnification may b...
7
8
9
Operable
• Don’t forget keyboards, yes keyboards
• Touch-size minimum
• Gestures
• Mouseup/touchend
• Keyboard equivalen...
10
11
Understandable
• Screen orientation
• Consistent layout
• But differences in orientation or
size OK (important)
• Provi...
12
13
Robust
• Data-type keyboards: a double-edged
sword
• Use standard elements and controls
14
15
Appendix A: The Four Principles of WCAG 2.0
Perceivable - Information and user interface components must be
presentable...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Accessibility Standards and the Mobile Web

639 views

Published on

How does the increasing preponderance of mobile device affect web accessibility? This talk focuses on the specific concerns that are raised when dealing with mobile devices. How does this affect decisions about responsive web design when we use a single codebase for different kinds of devices? What guidance do the recently released draft guidelines on WCAG 2.0 and the mobile web provide us?
Marco Maertens

Published in: Internet
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Accessibility Standards and the Mobile Web

  1. 1. Mobile Web Accessibility Marco Maertens @marcomaertens EvoHaX Accessibility Hackathon Philly Tech Week 2015 April 17, 2015
  2. 2. 2 Mobile Accessibility? • There is no mobile Web. Just one Web • Is there mobile accessibility? • Large overlap between mobile concerns and accessibility • Mobile has made us think not just about mobile
  3. 3. 3 What Are Some Mobile Accessibility Differences? • Touchscreen • Screen size • Easily adjustable orientation • Use context • AT implementation
  4. 4. 4 What is (W3C WAI) WCAG? • An effort of the W3C • Focused on Web accessibility • Standards set by wide consultation (world wide) • The basis of many legal requirements • Original and future basis of US Section 508
  5. 5. 5 WCAG 2.0 Mobile Accessibility Mapping document • A draft. Did a mention it’s a draft? • Not a change to WCAG 2.0. • Applies to mobile devices • Targeted to web sites and web apps. Hybrid and native apps can benefit, too!
  6. 6. 6 Perceivable • Minimizing content • Sufficient size (targets, fonts) to avoid unnecessary zoom • Zoom/magnification may be necessary • Consider user may need to pan • Contrast – even more important because of context
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. 9 Operable • Don’t forget keyboards, yes keyboards • Touch-size minimum • Gestures • Mouseup/touchend • Keyboard equivalents
  10. 10. 10
  11. 11. 11 Understandable • Screen orientation • Consistent layout • But differences in orientation or size OK (important) • Provide clear indication that element is actionable
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. 13 Robust • Data-type keyboards: a double-edged sword • Use standard elements and controls
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. 15 Appendix A: The Four Principles of WCAG 2.0 Perceivable - Information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive. This means that users must be able to perceive the information being presented (it can't be invisible to all of their senses) Operable - User interface components and navigation must be operable. This means that users must be able to operate the interface (the interface cannot require interaction that a user cannot perform) Understandable - Information and the operation of user interface must be understandable. This means that users must be able to understand the information as well as the operation of the user interface (the content or operation cannot be beyond their understanding) Robust - Content must be robust enough that it can be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies. This means that users must be able to access the content as technologies advance (as technologies and user agents evolve, the content should remain accessible)

×