Young Worker Awareness
Whats Safe? What isnt?A perfectly safe and healthy workplacewould have no hazards.Hazard: any situation, condition orthing...
DID you know that most injuries amongnew workers happen within the first year              of work? Young workers are at t...
DID you know that most injuries amongnew workers happen within the first year              of work? Most injuries take pla...
Do you know anyone that has  been injured on the job?What types of injuries can occur in theworkplace?– Sprains and strain...
What are some of the consequences      of a workplace injury.Short- and long-term disabilityDisfigurementDismembermentDeath
Lost YouthThis video features the true stories of four injuredyoung workers whose lives have been permanentlychanged by th...
Lost Youth             Click on               black              square              to start               video
Student Activity 1     Lost Youth QuizComplete Activity 1 beforeviewing the next few slides.
Lost Youth Video Quiz1. Young workers have the same risk of injury   on the job as other workers do.                   ❒ T...
Lost Youth Video Quiz2. Only jobs in industries such as construction and   forestry are dangerous for young workers.      ...
Lost Youth Video Quiz3. Injuries to young workers are often major ones.                     ❒ True ❒ FalseTrue  Injuries t...
Lost Youth Video Quiz4. Young workers don’t have any health and safety   rights on the job—they can get fired for speaking...
Lost Youth Video Quiz5. Only the WCB can guarantee workplace   safety for young workers.                  ❒ True ❒ FalseFa...
Lost Youth SummaryMore than 50 percent of work-relatedaccidents happen during a young worker’sfirst six months on the job....
Activity 2 Youth and Workplace InjuryComplete Activity 2 and submit         to teacher .
Hazards in the Workplace
Safety RAP             Click on               black              square              to start               video
Hazards in the WorkplaceIt is important to know what hazardsare, and to know what your rights andduties are when you meet ...
Hazards in the WorkplaceFor instance, you could slip and fall ona wet or greasy floor, or be burned by ahot grill.You coul...
Hazards in the WorkplaceBurns, cuts, muscle strains and brokenbones are acute injuries you can feel assoon as the accident...
How do you find a hazard?Ask yourself what if questions... What if I bump into the open containers of hot oil? What if the...
How do you find a hazard? Every job will have slightly different hazards. Wherever you work, there are 4 main types of haz...
How do you find a hazard?Biological hazards  – Bee stings  – Allergic reaction to plants, insects or     mold  – Being in ...
How do you find a hazard?Chemical hazards  – Using cleaning products regularly  – Using paint materials regularly  – Using...
How do you find a hazard?Psychosocial Hazards  – Intimidation, verbal abuse  – Working hours  – Rotating shift work
How do you find a hazard?Ergonomic hazards  – Repetitive motions  – Overexertion  – Awkward Postures
Activity 3        Hazard RecognitionUse the Activity 3 Sheet to completethe next section. Evaluate any three      workplac...
Controlling a HazardThree key steps that can be used tocontrol a hazard: – Recognition– Evaluation– Control
Controlling a HazardSee it.Questions to ask: What is unsafe? How many unsafe  acts or conditions are there? What are the h...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Hazard Recognition Scenarios   What unsafe acts or  conditions are shown          here?      Why is this a   hazardous sit...
Activity 4     Mark Ignores the RulesComplete the Activity 4 sheet before           continuing. Complete Activity and subm...
Mark Ignores the Rules1. What are possible consequences of Mark’s   decision?   Serious injury—finger or fingers could be ...
Mark Ignores the Rules2. List three ways Mark could have  handled Jim’s remark differently?  Tell Jim that he intends to f...
Mark Ignores the Rules3. What should Mark have done?  Used the safety guard  Listened to his supervisor, who gave  him the...
It Won’t Happen to Me                    Click on                      black                     square                   ...
The Law
Activity 5   Rights and ResponsibilitiesComplete Activity 5 sheet using the        following slides. Complete and hand in ...
Workplace Rights and       Responsibilities T-ChartWorker Rights A safe working environment Proper health and safety infor...
Workplace Rights and       Responsibilities T-ChartWorker Responsibilities Must pay attention to health and safety trainin...
Workplace Rights and       Responsibilities T-ChartEmployer Rights   Can expect workers to pay attention during health  an...
Workplace Rights and       Responsibilities T-ChartEmployer Responsibilities  Must provide health and safety training to a...
What should I do when I start a          new job?                           Click on                             black    ...
What should I do if I see something unsafe?                            Click on                              black        ...
Will I get into trouble if I ask          questions?                               Click on                               ...
Where can I go for help?                           Click on                             black                            s...
What can I do to make a      difference?                          Click on                            black               ...
WHMIS
WHMISWHMIS STANDS for Workplace HazardousMaterials Information System.WHMIS is a nation-wide system that gives youthe fact...
WHMIS ClassesWHMIS applies to materials called“controlled products”.A controlled product is a product that meetsthe criter...
WHMIS Classes
LabelsThere are two kinds of WHMIS labels —supplier labels and work site labelsSupplier labels appear on controlled produc...
LabelsSupplier labels contain 7 pieces of information:(1) product name;(2) name and address of the supplier(3) symbols for...
Labels
LabelsWork site labels appear on controlledproducts that have been transferredfrom suppliers’ containers to work siteconta...
Labels  Work site labels are less detailed than  supplier labels and only require three pieces  of information:(1) name of...
Labels
Material Safety Data SheetsIf you need to know more about a product thanyou can find on the label, go to the product’sMSDS...
Material Safety Data Sheets
Material Safety Data SheetsAn MSDS is supposed to be sent to an employerwith every controlled product the employer buys.MS...
Worker EducationThe third component of the system, WorkerEducation, helps workers understand WHMISinformation so they can ...
Worker EducationWHMIS worker education includes trainingworkers to understand:the information on WHMIS labels and MSDSs, t...
Worker Educationprocedures for dealing with fugitive emissions ofthe controlled products workers may encounterprocedures f...
Eight types of hazardous materials         covered by WHMIS Class A        Class B      Class Ccompressed   flammable and ...
Eight types of hazardous materials        covered by WHMIS  Class D1         Class D2         Class D3poisonous and    poi...
Eight types of hazardous materials        covered by WHMIS        Class E      Class F        corrosive   dangerously     ...
Click onsquareto start video
What if I get hurt?In all cases of injury or illness you must:  Get first aid treatment right away.  Tell your supervisor ...
Activity 6 / QuizComplete Activity 6 and hand in          to teacher.
Quiz  Complete the Online Quiz for       WHMIS at Quizstar.See student sheet for instructions.
Let’s Review
Practice Safety Quiz #1
1. Workers in Alberta have three basic  rights when it comes to health and  safety. Which of the following is not  one of ...
2. The number one cause of injury to  young workers is:A. Slips and fallsB. BurnsC. Breathing dangerous fumes
3. If you are injured on the job, the first  thing you should do is:A. Go homeB. Get first aid treatmentC. Fill out a WCB ...
4. True or false: Your boss can fire you  for refusing to perform unsafe work.A. TrueB. False
5. Most on-the-job injuries to young  people take place in which industry?A. ServiceB. Pulp and paperC. Automobile
6. True or false: People who work in  offices dont have to worry about  workplace health and safety.A. TrueB. False
7. You have to play your part too if you  want to work safely. Which of the  following are among your  responsibilities?A....
8. True or false: Your boss is required by  law to train you if you are exposed or  likely to be exposed to a hazardous  s...
9. True or false: Young workers have faster  reflexes, so they are less likely to be hurt  on the job.A. TrueB. False
10. If you have a question about health and  safety at work, you can talk to:A. Your health and safety representativeB. Yo...
11. What does WHMIS stand for?WorkplaceHazardousMaterialInformationSystem
12. What does the following WHMIS  symbols stand for?         Compressed Gas         Flammable
13. What does the following WHMIS  symbols stand for?          Poisonous         Corrosive
Personal Protective Equipment
Proper shop clothingClothing worn inthe shop should betight fitting and fireresistant.Clothing which isfrayed, torn, orsoi...
Proper shop clothingA loose piece ofclothing, such as aneck tie, is a hazardthat could causeserious injury ordeath.Coveral...
Fitting the Clothing to the JobSafety Clothing            Type of JobShort Sleeves              Power tools and           ...
Types of Head CoveringThe most seriousinjuries in the shopoften result frominjury to the head.Types of headprotection incl...
Eye ProtectionLoss of sight due toaccident can be themost tragic of lossesto the senses.Chances of injury tothe eyes is gr...
Eye ProtectionThe danger mayinvolve: impact from smallparticlessharp objectsharmful light rayschemical spills
Eye SafetyThere is a differencebetween safetyglasses andprescription glasses.Safety glassesprovide betterprotection fromim...
Eye ProtectionIt is important thatproper eyeprotection be wornat all times.The type ofequipment selectedmust be appropriat...
Eye and Face EquipmentGogglesSafety glassesFiltered lensesFace ShieldsWelding helmetsWelding gogglesEyewash equipment
Eye Safety: WeldingArc welding helmetsprotect the face, neckand ears from the directradiant energy and fromsparks and spla...
Eye Safety: WeldingFiltered lenses are usedfor welding.They help filter out theintense light andultraviolet rays.A #10 len...
Face ShieldsFace shields protect theface from flyingparticles, acids andother caustic liquids.Face shields are used inaddi...
Selecting the proper protectionOperation      Hazard                  Protection NeededGas Welding    Sparks, flying      ...
Eye CareDespite precautions,foreign material mayget in your eye.Such hazards includedust, battery acid,welding flux andsol...
Eye CareKeep the eyewashequipment clean.Follow the directions.Flush for at least 15minutes.See a doctor as soon aspossible.
Hand and Arm Protection30% of work injurieshappen to thefingers, hands andarms.Most of theseinjuries are fromcuts, splinte...
Hand and Arm ProtectionMost of these injuriescan be prevented byfollowing safetyprecautions.Wear gloves andbarrier lotion ...
Types of foot and leg            coveringsSmashed toes andbruised shins arecommon shop injuries.With proper protectionmany...
Proper Ear ProtectionProlonged exposureto loud noises cancause irreversibledamage to the ears.Plastic ear plugsmay be used...
Lung and Breathing ProtectionThe air we breathe may behazardous to our health.The inhalation ofdangerous fumes andfibers c...
Lung and Breathing ProtectionDust Masks Dust masks are effective against dust and fibers. They are comfortable, inexpensiv...
Lung and Breathing ProtectionChemical Mask This type of respirator is designed with a soft rubber cushion to allow it to f...
Common Breathing Hazards & EffectsSource           Hazard               EffectsEngines          CO2                  Dizzi...
Activity 7 Personal Protective EquipmentComplete and hand in Activity 7             sheet
Let’s Review
Practice Quiz #2
Quiz #2                                     tight1. Proper shop clothing should be _________ fittingand __________ _______...
Quiz #2                                            radiant5. Welding helmets protect the welder from _________energy, ____...
Quiz #28. Name five common injuries to the arms and hands.A. cutsB. splintersC. burnsD. sprainsE. broken bones
Quiz #29. When using spray paint what type of breathingprotection should you wear?   Chemical mask
Safe Shop Practices
Electrical SafetyElectricity may besupplied as 120 V or240 V.Tools and machines aredesigned to operate ononly one specific...
Electrical SafetyAn ungrounded electricpower tool can lead toan electric shock anddeath if the current ishigh enough.An el...
Electrical SafetyNever remove the thirdprong to match a twoslotted outlet.Check the insulation oncords for breaks orcracks...
Air Power SafetyCompressed air isused for operatingair tools, forspraying andcleaning.Use a “safety blow”nozzle whencleani...
Air Power SafetyA “safety blow”nozzle reduces theair pressure so itwont be more than30 psi.Always check fordamaged hoses o...
Air Power SafetyDo not turn the hosetowards others or yourown skin.The air may haveparticles that willpenetrate the skin.N...
ta                FuHe                  el       Oxygen
Fire SafetyFire can break outanywhere, includingwhere you work.Each year numerousfires in the workplacecause injury andpro...
Employees should know ...The location of twoexits closest to theirwork area.The location of thenearest fire alarm pullstat...
If You Discover a FireActivate the nearest firealarm pull station.Leave the areaimmediately, closing alldoors behind you.G...
The Use of ExtinguishersMost workplaces containportable fire extinguishers.Fire extinguishers can onlyput out small, conta...
Never fight a fireIf the fire is large orspreading.If your escape routemay be blocked by thespread of fire.If you are not ...
Fire Prevention Tips for a         Safer WorkplaceNo smoking in any shop areas.Check and replace any electrical cords that...
Fire Prevention Tips for a         Safer WorkplaceLeave enough space for the circulation of airaround heaters and other eq...
Fire Safety ChecklistRUBBISH - Dispose of daily; do notallow unnecessary accumulation.FLAMMABLES - Store safely in properc...
Fire Safety ChecklistMACHINERY - Keep clean and in goodworking order.COMBUSTIBLES - Keep well awayfrom sources of heat (at...
Fire Safety ChecklistEXITS, PASSAGEWAYS - Keep clear,unobstructed and unlocked!EVACUATION ALARM - Recognize it!EVACUATION ...
Fire Safety                        Multi-      OrdinaryKind of Carbon Water    purpose Dry DryFire    Dioxide Pump    Chem...
Let’s Review
Practice Quiz #3
Quiz #3                       remove1. Never remove the ___________ prong to match atwo conductor outlet.2. What is an exa...
Quiz #34. What is an example of a CLASS C fire?    Electrical fires5. What type of fire extinguisher puts out A,B, and Cty...
Quiz #3 7. True or false. Compressed air should never be used to clean benches in a metals shop? 8. What THREE elements do...
ReferencesYoung Worker Awareness ProgramCanada: Safety and Occupational HealthWorkers’ Compensation Board ofBritish Columb...
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  1. 1. Young Worker Awareness
  2. 2. Whats Safe? What isnt?A perfectly safe and healthy workplacewould have no hazards.Hazard: any situation, condition orthing that may be dangerous to thesafety or health of workers.Unfortunately, many workplacehazards are so familiar that we ignorethem and put ourselves, and sometimesothers, at risk.
  3. 3. DID you know that most injuries amongnew workers happen within the first year of work? Young workers are at the greatest risk of getting injured during their first six months on the job. Young men are more likely to be injured on the job than any other group of workers.
  4. 4. DID you know that most injuries amongnew workers happen within the first year of work? Most injuries take place in the service industry - to students and other young people working as waiters, cooks and store clerks
  5. 5. Do you know anyone that has been injured on the job?What types of injuries can occur in theworkplace?– Sprains and strains– Cuts– Broken bones– Loss of limbs– Crushing injuries– Internal organ damage– Eye injuries
  6. 6. What are some of the consequences of a workplace injury.Short- and long-term disabilityDisfigurementDismembermentDeath
  7. 7. Lost YouthThis video features the true stories of four injuredyoung workers whose lives have been permanentlychanged by their workplace accidents. While theaccident scenes are re-creations and not real, the youngpeople, their parents, and their stories are real. Warning: The video contains coarse language and graphic scenes.
  8. 8. Lost Youth Click on black square to start video
  9. 9. Student Activity 1 Lost Youth QuizComplete Activity 1 beforeviewing the next few slides.
  10. 10. Lost Youth Video Quiz1. Young workers have the same risk of injury on the job as other workers do. ❒ True ❒ FalseFalse Young people between 15 and 24 years are particularly vulnerable to work-related injuries. They’re eager to please and have much to offer, but they typically lack the experience to judge what’s safe and what’s not.
  11. 11. Lost Youth Video Quiz2. Only jobs in industries such as construction and forestry are dangerous for young workers. ❒ True ❒ FalseFalse When people think about the risk of workplace injury, they assume it is pretty much limited to jobs in construction and manufacturing, and it’s true— these industries can be hazardous. However, most youth work in restaurants, supermarkets, and retail stores. are often shocked to hear that these are the sectors with the highest rate of injury to young workers.
  12. 12. Lost Youth Video Quiz3. Injuries to young workers are often major ones. ❒ True ❒ FalseTrue Injuries to young workers do include minor strains, cuts, and bruises that heal quickly. But young workers also suffer from severe injuries—fractures and dislocations, for example—that result in short- term disability. Worst of all, young workers can and do suffer from very serious injuries such as amputations, broken backs, and third-degree burns. These injuries can mean permanent impairment, disfigurement, and disability
  13. 13. Lost Youth Video Quiz4. Young workers don’t have any health and safety rights on the job—they can get fired for speaking up. ❒ True ❒ FalseFalse All workers in Alberta are protected by the Workers Compensation Act . This legislation says employers must provide all employees with a safe workplace, adequate training and supervision, and properly maintained and functioning safety equipment. Workers also have the right to refuse work if they believe the task or conditions are unsafe. The Act also protects them from disciplinary action for reporting a safety or other work-related problem. Concerns can be reported anonymously to the WCB
  14. 14. Lost Youth Video Quiz5. Only the WCB can guarantee workplace safety for young workers. ❒ True ❒ FalseFalse Keeping young workers safe is a shared responsibility. Employers, unions, co- workers, parents, educators, youth, the community, and the WCB all have a part to play.
  15. 15. Lost Youth SummaryMore than 50 percent of work-relatedaccidents happen during a young worker’sfirst six months on the job.Males under 25 are much more likely to beinjured on the job than any other workers.Each day in Alberta., 34 young workers arehurt on the job, or one every 42 minutes.Every week, five of these young workers arepermanently disabled in workplace accidents.
  16. 16. Activity 2 Youth and Workplace InjuryComplete Activity 2 and submit to teacher .
  17. 17. Hazards in the Workplace
  18. 18. Safety RAP Click on black square to start video
  19. 19. Hazards in the WorkplaceIt is important to know what hazardsare, and to know what your rights andduties are when you meet them.Some hazards can cause an immediateinjury.
  20. 20. Hazards in the WorkplaceFor instance, you could slip and fall ona wet or greasy floor, or be burned by ahot grill.You could get splashed by a chemical,such as sulfuric acid or ammonia, andget a burn.A fire or an explosion can cause seriousinjury or death.
  21. 21. Hazards in the WorkplaceBurns, cuts, muscle strains and brokenbones are acute injuries you can feel assoon as the accident happens.Some hazards can cause you to becomesick or injured over a period of time.For instance, if you work with certainhazardous chemicals, the damage thathappens in your body may not be noticedright away.
  22. 22. How do you find a hazard?Ask yourself what if questions... What if I bump into the open containers of hot oil? What if the forklift tips over on my co- worker in a fast turn? What if I inhale the toxic fumes from the toilet cleaning chemicals? Learn to spot a hazard - before an incident happens - is the first step to staying safe.
  23. 23. How do you find a hazard? Every job will have slightly different hazards. Wherever you work, there are 4 main types of hazards and some examples:Physical hazards – Using the same tool all day long – Being crushed by equipment – Tripping or falling
  24. 24. How do you find a hazard?Biological hazards – Bee stings – Allergic reaction to plants, insects or mold – Being in contact with materials where viruses or bacteria are present
  25. 25. How do you find a hazard?Chemical hazards – Using cleaning products regularly – Using paint materials regularly – Using toxic chemicals
  26. 26. How do you find a hazard?Psychosocial Hazards – Intimidation, verbal abuse – Working hours – Rotating shift work
  27. 27. How do you find a hazard?Ergonomic hazards – Repetitive motions – Overexertion – Awkward Postures
  28. 28. Activity 3 Hazard RecognitionUse the Activity 3 Sheet to completethe next section. Evaluate any three workplaces illustrated. Complete Activity and submit to teacher .
  29. 29. Controlling a HazardThree key steps that can be used tocontrol a hazard: – Recognition– Evaluation– Control
  30. 30. Controlling a HazardSee it.Questions to ask: What is unsafe? How many unsafe acts or conditions are there? What are the hazards?Think it.Questions to ask: Why is it a hazardous situation? What could happen? What is creating the hazard? What injuries could occur?Do it.Questions to ask: What could be done to prevent an accident from happening? What could minimize the risk? What could be done to eliminate or minimize the hazard?
  31. 31. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  32. 32. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  33. 33. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  34. 34. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  35. 35. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  36. 36. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  37. 37. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  38. 38. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  39. 39. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  40. 40. Hazard Recognition Scenarios What unsafe acts or conditions are shown here? Why is this a hazardous situation? What should the worker do to prevent an accident from happening?
  41. 41. Activity 4 Mark Ignores the RulesComplete the Activity 4 sheet before continuing. Complete Activity and submit to teacher .
  42. 42. Mark Ignores the Rules1. What are possible consequences of Mark’s decision? Serious injury—finger or fingers could be cut off Reprimand from his supervisor Delay in completion of Work Experience assignment Possible removal from Work Experience program
  43. 43. Mark Ignores the Rules2. List three ways Mark could have handled Jim’s remark differently? Tell Jim that he intends to follow the safety rules Tell Jim that he was trained and instructed to use the safety guard Not comment on the remark and follow the rules anyway
  44. 44. Mark Ignores the Rules3. What should Mark have done? Used the safety guard Listened to his supervisor, who gave him the proper instruction on use of the saw
  45. 45. It Won’t Happen to Me Click on black square to start video
  46. 46. The Law
  47. 47. Activity 5 Rights and ResponsibilitiesComplete Activity 5 sheet using the following slides. Complete and hand in to teacher.
  48. 48. Workplace Rights and Responsibilities T-ChartWorker Rights A safe working environment Proper health and safety information, instruction, and training Supervision to make sure the job is done safely Well-maintained and functioning personal protective equipment Right to refuse to do work that may endanger a worker’s safety or put a worker’s health at risk Right to participate in workplace health and safety committees and activities
  49. 49. Workplace Rights and Responsibilities T-ChartWorker Responsibilities Must pay attention to health and safety training Must follow all health and safety procedures Must ask questions when information is unclear Must always wear personal protective equipment and keep it in good condition Must use machinery and equipment properly Must familiarize himself or herself with emergency procedures, location of fire extinguishers, emergency exits, etc. Must report any perceived hazards on the job Must refuse to do any work that might create an undue hazard
  50. 50. Workplace Rights and Responsibilities T-ChartEmployer Rights Can expect workers to pay attention during health and safety training Can expect workers to remember their training and follow health and safety principles at all times Can expect workers to report any perceived hazards in the workplace Can expect workers to wear their personal protective equipment at all times Can expect workers to inform them about any physical or mental conditions that may impair their ability to perform their jobs safely
  51. 51. Workplace Rights and Responsibilities T-ChartEmployer Responsibilities Must provide health and safety training to all workers for general and specific tasks Must develop a workplace health and safety policy (e.g., what to do in emergency situations) Must display health and safety information where all workers can see it Must provide well-maintained and properly functioning personal protective equipment for all workers Must alert workers to any hazards in the workplace and provide information on how to minimize
  52. 52. What should I do when I start a new job? Click on black square to start video
  53. 53. What should I do if I see something unsafe? Click on black square to start video
  54. 54. Will I get into trouble if I ask questions? Click on black square to start video
  55. 55. Where can I go for help? Click on black square to start video
  56. 56. What can I do to make a difference? Click on black square to start video
  57. 57. WHMIS
  58. 58. WHMISWHMIS STANDS for Workplace HazardousMaterials Information System.WHMIS is a nation-wide system that gives youthe facts you need about the materials youhandle in the workplace. WHMIS has three components: (1) Labels (2) Worker Education (3) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)
  59. 59. WHMIS ClassesWHMIS applies to materials called“controlled products”.A controlled product is a product that meetsthe criteria for one or more of the six WHMIShazard classes.Each class, except Class D, has a separate“hazard symbol.Class D has three hazard symbols — one foreach of its divisions.
  60. 60. WHMIS Classes
  61. 61. LabelsThere are two kinds of WHMIS labels —supplier labels and work site labelsSupplier labels appear on controlled productspurchased from Canadian suppliers Supplier labels provide basic informationabout how to handle a product safely.Supplier labels have a distinctive rectangularslash-marked border.
  62. 62. LabelsSupplier labels contain 7 pieces of information:(1) product name;(2) name and address of the supplier(3) symbols for each of the product’s hazard classes(4) main hazards of the product(5) precautions during handling and use of the product(6) first aid measures(7) reference to the MSDS for more information
  63. 63. Labels
  64. 64. LabelsWork site labels appear on controlledproducts that have been transferredfrom suppliers’ containers to work sitecontainers, or products where thesupplier label may be damaged ormissing and on controlled productsmade at the work site
  65. 65. Labels Work site labels are less detailed than supplier labels and only require three pieces of information:(1) name of the product;(2) information on how to use the product safely; and(3) reference to the MSDS for further information.
  66. 66. Labels
  67. 67. Material Safety Data SheetsIf you need to know more about a product thanyou can find on the label, go to the product’sMSDS.These sheets have more detailed informationabout a product’s properties, its hazards, and howto prevent overexposure.There is no specific required layout for theWHMIS MSDS, but it must include at least each ofthe nine categories of information and therequired detailed information in each category.
  68. 68. Material Safety Data Sheets
  69. 69. Material Safety Data SheetsAn MSDS is supposed to be sent to an employerwith every controlled product the employer buys.MSDSs must never be more than three years old.The MSDSs for all controlled products at a worksite must be kept in a place where workers haveeasy access to them.If you are a worker and don’t know where they’rekept, ask your supervisor.
  70. 70. Worker EducationThe third component of the system, WorkerEducation, helps workers understand WHMISinformation so they can work safely withcontrolled products.This education explains the WHMIS system andgives workers specific training related to thecontrolled products they work with at theirworkplace .Employers are required to provide workereducation for WHMIS.
  71. 71. Worker EducationWHMIS worker education includes trainingworkers to understand:the information on WHMIS labels and MSDSs, themeaning of that information and its application totheir workidentification systems that are used in place oflabels at a work sitespecific procedures for safe use, handling, storageand disposal of the controlled products thatworkers handle
  72. 72. Worker Educationprocedures for dealing with fugitive emissions ofthe controlled products workers may encounterprocedures for emergencies involving controlledproducts.The information taught in a WHMIS workereducation program is important because it helpsworkers protect their health and safety at work.
  73. 73. Eight types of hazardous materials covered by WHMIS Class A Class B Class Ccompressed flammable and gas combustible oxidizing material material
  74. 74. Eight types of hazardous materials covered by WHMIS Class D1 Class D2 Class D3poisonous and poisonous and infectious infectious poisonous and material: material: infectious materials material material: causing causing other biohazardousimmediate and toxic effects infectious serious toxic material effects
  75. 75. Eight types of hazardous materials covered by WHMIS Class E Class F corrosive dangerously material reactive material
  76. 76. Click onsquareto start video
  77. 77. What if I get hurt?In all cases of injury or illness you must: Get first aid treatment right away. Tell your supervisor about any injury. Tell your supervisor about any illness or condition that you believe happened because of work. Choose your own doctor, and see them on a regular basis, or as recommended. Fill out and return all WCB forms right away. You can get the forms you need from your supervisor.
  78. 78. Activity 6 / QuizComplete Activity 6 and hand in to teacher.
  79. 79. Quiz Complete the Online Quiz for WHMIS at Quizstar.See student sheet for instructions.
  80. 80. Let’s Review
  81. 81. Practice Safety Quiz #1
  82. 82. 1. Workers in Alberta have three basic rights when it comes to health and safety. Which of the following is not one of your rights?A. The right to know about workplace hazardsB. The right to shut down an unsafe workplaceC. The right to refuse unsafe workD. The right to participate in health and safety inspections and recommendations
  83. 83. 2. The number one cause of injury to young workers is:A. Slips and fallsB. BurnsC. Breathing dangerous fumes
  84. 84. 3. If you are injured on the job, the first thing you should do is:A. Go homeB. Get first aid treatmentC. Fill out a WCB form
  85. 85. 4. True or false: Your boss can fire you for refusing to perform unsafe work.A. TrueB. False
  86. 86. 5. Most on-the-job injuries to young people take place in which industry?A. ServiceB. Pulp and paperC. Automobile
  87. 87. 6. True or false: People who work in offices dont have to worry about workplace health and safety.A. TrueB. False
  88. 88. 7. You have to play your part too if you want to work safely. Which of the following are among your responsibilities?A. Work smart; work safe - dont fool around on the jobB. Report unsafe conditionsC. Dress for the job - wear any required protective equipment or clothingD. All of the above
  89. 89. 8. True or false: Your boss is required by law to train you if you are exposed or likely to be exposed to a hazardous substance.A. TrueB. False
  90. 90. 9. True or false: Young workers have faster reflexes, so they are less likely to be hurt on the job.A. TrueB. False
  91. 91. 10. If you have a question about health and safety at work, you can talk to:A. Your health and safety representativeB. Your supervisorC. A member of the workplace joint health and safety committeeD. Any of the above
  92. 92. 11. What does WHMIS stand for?WorkplaceHazardousMaterialInformationSystem
  93. 93. 12. What does the following WHMIS symbols stand for? Compressed Gas Flammable
  94. 94. 13. What does the following WHMIS symbols stand for? Poisonous Corrosive
  95. 95. Personal Protective Equipment
  96. 96. Proper shop clothingClothing worn inthe shop should betight fitting and fireresistant.Clothing which isfrayed, torn, orsoiled frompetroleum productsis a hazard.
  97. 97. Proper shop clothingA loose piece ofclothing, such as aneck tie, is a hazardthat could causeserious injury ordeath.Coveralls or auniform type shirtand pants is usuallyacceptable.
  98. 98. Fitting the Clothing to the JobSafety Clothing Type of JobShort Sleeves Power tools and machinesLong Sleeves Oxyacetylene welding & cuttingLeather Sleeves / Jacket Electric Arc welding/MIG weldingAprons Grinding & sheet metalRubber Aprons and Caustics, chemicals orGloves solvents
  99. 99. Types of Head CoveringThe most seriousinjuries in the shopoften result frominjury to the head.Types of headprotection include: – Hard hat – Skull cap – Bump caps
  100. 100. Eye ProtectionLoss of sight due toaccident can be themost tragic of lossesto the senses.Chances of injury tothe eyes is great inthe shopenvironment.
  101. 101. Eye ProtectionThe danger mayinvolve: impact from smallparticlessharp objectsharmful light rayschemical spills
  102. 102. Eye SafetyThere is a differencebetween safetyglasses andprescription glasses.Safety glassesprovide betterprotection fromimpact thanprescription glasses.
  103. 103. Eye ProtectionIt is important thatproper eyeprotection be wornat all times.The type ofequipment selectedmust be appropriateto the situation.
  104. 104. Eye and Face EquipmentGogglesSafety glassesFiltered lensesFace ShieldsWelding helmetsWelding gogglesEyewash equipment
  105. 105. Eye Safety: WeldingArc welding helmetsprotect the face, neckand ears from the directradiant energy and fromsparks and splatter.Gas welding gogglesmust totally cover theeyes to protect the eyesfrom sparks, moltenmetal and glare.
  106. 106. Eye Safety: WeldingFiltered lenses are usedfor welding.They help filter out theintense light andultraviolet rays.A #10 lens is used forelectric welding.A #5 lens is used for gaswelding and cutting.
  107. 107. Face ShieldsFace shields protect theface from flyingparticles, acids andother caustic liquids.Face shields are used inaddition to safetyglasses or goggles.Face shields alone donot provide adequateeye protection.
  108. 108. Selecting the proper protectionOperation Hazard Protection NeededGas Welding Sparks, flying Filtered welding particles, molten goggles metalElectric Sparks, intense rays, Welding HelmetWelding molten metalFoundry Heat, glare, splash, Safety glasses with sparks face shieldGrinding Flying particles and Safety glasses with sparks face shieldMachining Flying particles Safety glasses or gogglesGeneral shop Flying particles Safety glasses orwork goggles
  109. 109. Eye CareDespite precautions,foreign material mayget in your eye.Such hazards includedust, battery acid,welding flux andsolvents.An eyewash should beused to flush thesubstance from the eye.
  110. 110. Eye CareKeep the eyewashequipment clean.Follow the directions.Flush for at least 15minutes.See a doctor as soon aspossible.
  111. 111. Hand and Arm Protection30% of work injurieshappen to thefingers, hands andarms.Most of theseinjuries are fromcuts, splinters,burns, sprains andbroken bones.
  112. 112. Hand and Arm ProtectionMost of these injuriescan be prevented byfollowing safetyprecautions.Wear gloves andbarrier lotion asrequired.Barrier lotions help toblock out somechemicals.
  113. 113. Types of foot and leg coveringsSmashed toes andbruised shins arecommon shop injuries.With proper protectionmany of these injuriescan be prevented.Steel toed shoesshould be worn whereneeded.
  114. 114. Proper Ear ProtectionProlonged exposureto loud noises cancause irreversibledamage to the ears.Plastic ear plugsmay be used, butacoustical ear muffprovide the bestprotection.
  115. 115. Lung and Breathing ProtectionThe air we breathe may behazardous to our health.The inhalation ofdangerous fumes andfibers can be prevented byproper ventilation.When dealing with anycontaminants wear anappropriate mask orrespirator.
  116. 116. Lung and Breathing ProtectionDust Masks Dust masks are effective against dust and fibers. They are comfortable, inexpensive and disposable.
  117. 117. Lung and Breathing ProtectionChemical Mask This type of respirator is designed with a soft rubber cushion to allow it to fit tight around the face. It contains a chemical cartridge element and a filtering element.. Choose a mask that is designed for the material being filtered.
  118. 118. Common Breathing Hazards & EffectsSource Hazard EffectsEngines CO2 Dizziness, drowsiness, sudden deathPaint Toxic Vapors May damage lungs, livers & kidneysWood Working Wood Dust Damaging to the sinuses & nasal cavityWelding Nitrogen Dioxide / Fluid in the lungs, Toxic Vapors headaches & sudden deathParts Cleaning Petroleum Solvents Headaches, lung, kidney & liver damage
  119. 119. Activity 7 Personal Protective EquipmentComplete and hand in Activity 7 sheet
  120. 120. Let’s Review
  121. 121. Practice Quiz #2
  122. 122. Quiz #2 tight1. Proper shop clothing should be _________ fittingand __________ ____________. Fire Resistant leather2. When welding always wear a _________ jacket.3. A ________ _______ is the most common type of hard hathead protection worn on the job site.4. True or false. Prescription glasses provide adequateprotection in the shop.
  123. 123. Quiz #2 radiant5. Welding helmets protect the welder from _________energy, ________ and _____________. sparks splatter 56. A number ____ lens should be worn when gaswelding and a number _____ lens for electric arc 10welding.7. True or false. Face shields were designed as eyeprotection.
  124. 124. Quiz #28. Name five common injuries to the arms and hands.A. cutsB. splintersC. burnsD. sprainsE. broken bones
  125. 125. Quiz #29. When using spray paint what type of breathingprotection should you wear? Chemical mask
  126. 126. Safe Shop Practices
  127. 127. Electrical SafetyElectricity may besupplied as 120 V or240 V.Tools and machines aredesigned to operate ononly one specificvoltage.Serious damage and firecan result if you use theincorrect voltage.
  128. 128. Electrical SafetyAn ungrounded electricpower tool can lead toan electric shock anddeath if the current ishigh enough.An electric power handtool or stationarymachine must begrounded.
  129. 129. Electrical SafetyNever remove the thirdprong to match a twoslotted outlet.Check the insulation oncords for breaks orcracks.Never stand on wetground or floor whileusing electric tools.
  130. 130. Air Power SafetyCompressed air isused for operatingair tools, forspraying andcleaning.Use a “safety blow”nozzle whencleaning withcompressed air.
  131. 131. Air Power SafetyA “safety blow”nozzle reduces theair pressure so itwont be more than30 psi.Always check fordamaged hoses orconnections.
  132. 132. Air Power SafetyDo not turn the hosetowards others or yourown skin.The air may haveparticles that willpenetrate the skin.Never use compressedair to clean metalfragments.
  133. 133. ta FuHe el Oxygen
  134. 134. Fire SafetyFire can break outanywhere, includingwhere you work.Each year numerousfires in the workplacecause injury andproperty loss.
  135. 135. Employees should know ...The location of twoexits closest to theirwork area.The location of thenearest fire alarm pullstation and how to useit.Your responsibilities ina fire, which are in thefire safety plan.
  136. 136. If You Discover a FireActivate the nearest firealarm pull station.Leave the areaimmediately, closing alldoors behind you.Go to the nearest exitand leave the building.Close all doors behindyou.
  137. 137. The Use of ExtinguishersMost workplaces containportable fire extinguishers.Fire extinguishers can onlyput out small, containedfires, such as a fire in awastebasket.If you have not beentrained in the proper useof portable extinguishers,do not attempt to fight afire.
  138. 138. Never fight a fireIf the fire is large orspreading.If your escape routemay be blocked by thespread of fire.If you are not trainedin the correct use of theextinguisher or areunsure of the type offire.
  139. 139. Fire Prevention Tips for a Safer WorkplaceNo smoking in any shop areas.Check and replace any electrical cords that havecracked insulation or broken connectors.Avoid octopus wiring.Do not run extension cords across doorways orunder rugs.Avoid plugging more than one extension cord intoan outlet.Use only CSA approved power tools.
  140. 140. Fire Prevention Tips for a Safer WorkplaceLeave enough space for the circulation of airaround heaters and other equipment such aswelders and wood working machines.Keep all power tools a safe distance fromcombustible materials.Always turn off or unplug tools and machines atthe end of each day.
  141. 141. Fire Safety ChecklistRUBBISH - Dispose of daily; do notallow unnecessary accumulation.FLAMMABLES - Store safely in propercontainers; no breaks, or spills.HOUSEKEEPING - Keep the work areaneat and clean.WIRING - Report or repair unsafeconditions.
  142. 142. Fire Safety ChecklistMACHINERY - Keep clean and in goodworking order.COMBUSTIBLES - Keep well awayfrom sources of heat (at least 3 feet).VENTILATION - Ventilate waste andhigh-fume areas.EXTINGUISHERS - Keep in place theproper ones and mark them well if outof sight.
  143. 143. Fire Safety ChecklistEXITS, PASSAGEWAYS - Keep clear,unobstructed and unlocked!EVACUATION ALARM - Recognize it!EVACUATION PROCEDURES -Practice and make sure everyone knowsthe procedures.ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT - Keep at aminimum clearance of at least 3 feet .Do not overload circuits.
  144. 144. Fire Safety Multi- OrdinaryKind of Carbon Water purpose Dry DryFire Dioxide Pump Chemical ChemicalClass AWood,Paper, ClothClass BFlammableLiquidsClass CElectricalEquipment
  145. 145. Let’s Review
  146. 146. Practice Quiz #3
  147. 147. Quiz #3 remove1. Never remove the ___________ prong to match atwo conductor outlet.2. What is an example of a CLASS A fire? Ordinary combustibles such as paper, cloth or wood.3. What is an example of a CLASS B fire? Flammable liquids such as oil and gas.
  148. 148. Quiz #34. What is an example of a CLASS C fire? Electrical fires5. What type of fire extinguisher puts out A,B, and Ctype fires? Multipurpose Dry Chemical6. What does a “safety nozzle” do? Reduces the air pressure to a maximum of 30 psi.
  149. 149. Quiz #3 7. True or false. Compressed air should never be used to clean benches in a metals shop? 8. What THREE elements do you need to start a fire? Heat - Fuel - Oxygen 9. Fire extinguishers should only be used to put out __________ fires. small10. Oily rags should be stored in __________ containers. metal
  150. 150. ReferencesYoung Worker Awareness ProgramCanada: Safety and Occupational HealthWorkers’ Compensation Board ofBritish Columbia. Student WorkSafeplanning 10 Workbook.Canada Safety CouncilMicrosoft Clip Gallery Live

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