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Narrative Design for Social Impact:
The Project Model Canvas

Lina Srivastava (www.linasrivastava.com)
Adapted from the Bu...
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How to Use the Canvas:
Be as specific as possible in your answers. Move through the canvas in a clockwise direction, starti...
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Narrative Design Canvas

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The Project Model Canvas for Social Impact / Narrative Design, inspired by the Business Model Canvas by Alex Osterwalder and Business Model Generation.

Published in: Business
  • Great, if you could send an anonymised version on to hayesjeremy [at] gmail I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
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  • Thanks! I have examples I can share offline, since they're client work and I'd have to keep details confidential. Not sure who else has used as I never asked for that.
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  • Very interesting. Have you any examples that illustrate how the NDC works? Great work!
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Narrative Design Canvas

  1. 1. Narrative Design for Social Impact: The Project Model Canvas Lina Srivastava (www.linasrivastava.com) Adapted from the Business Model Canvas (www.businessmodelgeneration.com) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/
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  3. 3. How to Use the Canvas: Be as specific as possible in your answers. Move through the canvas in a clockwise direction, starting in the upper right. 1. “Change Statement”: What change in situation is the goal of the project being mapped? 2. “Audience Segments.” Who is consuming your media or strategy? Who is interacting with it? 3. “Audience Engagement”: This is akin to community engagement in other realms. What are you asking your audiences to do? What are you providing? How can you interact with your audience, digitally or in the real world? 4. “Distribution Channels”: Where are you finding your audiences? How will you distribute your content to them? 5. “Partners”: This is akin to stakeholder analysis in other realms. Remember that beneficiary populations can and should be included in your analysis as partners, not as recipients. (a) Who are your core partners, who will help you co-create your project and content? (b) Who are your amplification partners, who will spread the word? (c) Which populations are you serving with this project? (d) Who are your beneficiary partners? 6. “Activities”: What is your “to-do” list? What do you need to do to succeed in the project? 7. “Resources”: What do you have and what do you need in order to succeed? 8. “Themes and Issues”: What are the social impact issues you’re working on? How does your project align with larger social issue themes in the world? What is your value proposition to add to those issues with this project? 9. “Narrative Statement”: What is the story you are telling? How does that support the “Change Statement”? 10. Check the Change Statement and Narrative Statement against each other to make sure each represents what is appropriate to your partners, audiences, and desired change. (Optional to some projects) 11. “Costs”: What is your budget? 12. “Revenue Streams”: (a) Where will you source the money to realize this project? (b) Will you generate revenue from the project? For more information or questions, please contact Lina Srivastava at info@linasrivastava.com 3

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