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Claude Debussy:
La musique est l'arithmétique du son, comme
l'optique est la géométrie de la lumière.
Claude Debussy – ...
  
EU IP SIQS
EU STREP EQuaM
Advanced ERC Grant:
OSYRIS
John Templeton
Foundation
EU FET-Proactive
QUIC
SGR 874
Advanced E...
ICFO – Quantum Optics Theory
PhD ICFO:
Samuel Mugel (QRandom Walks)
Aniello Lampo (Open Systems)
David Raventos (Gauge Fie...
  
Why are we here?
A narcissistic motivation…
Barcelona Final eng sub small.mp4
Outline: Abstraction in Science and Art
• Abstraction in [Western] visual art
 Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art...
Introduction
Introduction
Abstraction: definition from Wikipedia:
Abstraction is a process by which concepts are derived
from the usage...
Abstraction in mathematics
• Definition from Wikipedia:
“Abstraction in mathematics is the process of extracting the
under...
Abstraction in mathematics
• Equivalence relations:
• A given binary relation ~ on a set X is said to be an
equivalence re...
Introduction
• Modelling in science:
ML dixit: is the process of extracting the underlying essence of
a real world phenome...
Abstraction in Physics
Abstraction in physics
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist model”: reality
Reality is very complex and complicated. If ...
Abstraction in physics: How do we build models?
Interesting phenomenon: A pendulum
From its discovery in around
1602 by G...
Interesting quantum phenomenon:
Superconductivity
Superconductors are “ideal” conductors,
they conduct electric currents...
Superconductivity:
Theory
We (some of us) believe there exist a
simple model that captures the phenomenon
of high Tc sup...
Simple Hubbard model
First band
Tunneling On site interactions
(Fermi) Hubbard model
∑−+∑
><
+−
↑↓
∑=
,,
..
,2
1
si
isnch
...
Quantum Simulators: Ideology
There exist many interesting quantum
phenomena (such as superconductivity)
 Maybe we can u...
3D Lattice Potential (by courtesy of M. Greiner,
O. Mandel, T. Esslinger, I. Bloch, and T. Hänsch)
•Resulting potential co...
Ultracold atoms in optical lattices: Simulating quantum many-body physics
M. Lewenstein, A. Sanpera, V. Ahufinger, Oxford ...
Abstraction in Visual Art
Abstraction in visual art
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” - realism
Modern and contemporary art is to a great ...
Abstraction in visual art: Realism
Leonardo Da Vinci (1452-1519)
“La Dama con l’Ermellino” (Lady with
Ermine) – a portrait...
Abstraction in visual art: Impressionism
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art”
-impressionism
“Impressionist paintin...
Abstraction in visual art: Impressionism
Claude Monet (1840-1926)
“Impression, soleil levant” – dated 1872, its subject is...
Abstraction in visual art: Cubism
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” - Cubism
In Cubist artwork, objects are anal...
Abstraction in visual art: Cubism
George Braque
(1882-1963)
Georges Braque's 1908
“Maisons à l’Estaque” (Houses
at L’Estaq...
Abstraction in visual art: Cubism
Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)
Picasso’s, Les Demoiselles
d'Avignon, 1907, considered to
be a...
Abstraction in visual art: Cubism
Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)
Gertrude Stein referred to
landscapes made by Picasso in
1909,...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” –
abstract art
“Abstract art uses a vi...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art
Piet Mondrian
(1872-1944)
Pieter Cornelis "Piet" Mondriaan,
after 1906 Mondrian, w...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art
Kazimir Malevich
(1879-1935)
Kazimir Severinovich Malevich was a
Russian painter a...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art
Katarzyna Kobro (1898-1951) was a Polish sculptor of Russian, Latvian and German o...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art
Władysław Strzemiński (1893-1952)
was a Polish constructivist and avant-
garde pai...
Abstraction in visual art
Ideology: abstracting from
“classicist art”
– Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism is a...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Expressionism
Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) known as Jackson Pollock, was an influe...
Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Expressionism
Mark Rothko (Latvian:
Markus Rotkovičs, Marcus
Yakovlevich Rothkowitz;
1...
Abstraction in Music - Jazz
Abstraction in music
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist music” –
tonal and harmonic music
Modern and contemporary musi...
Abstraction in music
Ideology: abstracting from “classicist music” –
tonal and harmonic music
Tonality is a system/languag...
Abstraction in music: Classicist jazz - Swing
Swing music, or simply Swing, is a form of American jazz that developed in t...
Abstraction in music: Bebop
Bebop or bop is a style of jazz characterized by fast tempo, instrumental
virtuosity, and impr...
Abstraction in music: Modal Jazz
In music, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or
pitch. ...
Abstraction in music: Free Jazz
Free jazz is an approach to jazz music that was first developed in the 1950s and
1960s. Th...
Abstraction in music: Free Improvised Jazz/Music
Free improvisation or free music is improvised music without any rules
be...
ICFO-QOT
Progress Status Workshop
Barcelona
18-20 March 2015
Miscellanea
The Concert - Free Improvised Music
Vasco Trilla
El Pricto
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76th ICREA Colloquium "Abstraction in Science and Art: From Quantum Simulators to Free Improvised Jazz" by Maciej Lewenstein (ICREA Research Professor at ICFO) and jazz musicians Vasco Trilla and El Pricto

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The colloquium starts with a 13 minute long movie “Physics, Jazz and Poetry”, which documents a concert by the Tomasz Stańko New York Quartet, celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Nobel Prize for the late Polish poet, Wisława Szymborska. The concert was held in Barcelona in March 2016 under the patronage of ICREA and ICFO. After the film Maciej Lewenstein introduces the concept of abstraction, first quoting Wikipedia, and then discussing abstraction in mathematics and equivalence relations. He argues that in natural sciences essentially “Modelling = Abstraction”, and illustrates this in physics, in which building of models is based on abstracting from details of reality. He discusses two examples: a pendulum and the so called quantum simulators of high Tc superconductors. He then looks at the development of the contemporary art as a process of abstraction from the rules of realism in the Western visual arts, or of harmony and tonality in the Western music. In the latter case, he bases his examples on the history of jazz from the swing era to the free improvised music of the XXIst century. The talk ends with a short 20 minute live concert of the free improvised jazz by Vasco Trilla (drums, percussion) and El Pricto (reeds).

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76th ICREA Colloquium "Abstraction in Science and Art: From Quantum Simulators to Free Improvised Jazz" by Maciej Lewenstein (ICREA Research Professor at ICFO) and jazz musicians Vasco Trilla and El Pricto

  1. 1.    Claude Debussy: La musique est l'arithmétique du son, comme l'optique est la géométrie de la lumière. Claude Debussy – Préludes, Livre I, La fille aux cheveux de lin, performed by Krystian Zimerman
  2. 2.    EU IP SIQS EU STREP EQuaM Advanced ERC Grant: OSYRIS John Templeton Foundation EU FET-Proactive QUIC SGR 874 Advanced ERC Grant: QUAGATUA FNP Polish Science Foundation NCN Narodowe Centrum Nauki AvH Feodor Lynen CERCA/Program MPG MPI Garching Sym fonia FOQUS and FISICATEAMO Abstraction in Science and Art: From Quantum Simulators to Free Improvised Jazz
  3. 3. ICFO – Quantum Optics Theory PhD ICFO: Samuel Mugel (QRandom Walks) Aniello Lampo (Open Systems) David Raventos (Gauge Fields) Emanuelle Tirito (TNS) Angelo Piga (TNS) Nils-Eric Gűnther (many body) Christos Charampoulos (Open Sys) Noslen Suárez (Atto) MPI Garching postdoc: Arnau Riera (Qthermo, Qdyn) Postdocs ICFO: Alessio Celi (LGT, Gen. Rel.) Pietro Massignan (Fermions, Disorder) Miguel Angel García March (Gauge Fields) Michał Tomża (Quant-chemistry): Christian Gogolin (QI, D-wave computers) Shi-Ju Ran (TNS, many body) James Quach (many body) Alexis Chacón (Atto) Manab Bera (QI) Swapan Rana (QI) Alexandre Duaphin Ex-members and collaborators: François Dubin (CNRS), G. John Lapeyre (CSIC), Luca Tagliacozzo (Stathclyde), Matthieu Alloing (Paris), Tomek Sowiński (IFPAN), Phillip Hauke (IQOQI), Omjyoti Dutta (Donostia), Christian Trefzger (Paris); Kuba Zakrzewski (UJ, Cracow), Mariusz Gajda (IF PAN), Boris Malomed (Haifa), Ulrich Ebling (Kyoto), Bruno Julia Díaz (UB), Christine Muschik (IQOQI), Marek Kuś, Remigiusz Augusiak (CFT), Julia Stasińska (IFPAN), Alexander Streltsov (FUB), Ravindra Chhajlany (UAM), Fernando Cucchietti (MareNostrum), Anna Sanpera (UAB), Veronica Ahufinger (UAB), Tobias Grass (JQI,UMD/NIST), Jordi Tura (MPQ)
  4. 4.    Why are we here? A narcissistic motivation… Barcelona Final eng sub small.mp4
  5. 5. Outline: Abstraction in Science and Art • Abstraction in [Western] visual art  Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art”: realism  From realism to abstract expressionism • Introduction  Abstraction: definitions from Wikipedia  Abstraction in mathematics: equivalence relations  Modelling = Abstraction • Abstraction in physics  Ideology: abstracting from “classicist physics”: reality  How do we build models? A pendulum  High Tc superconductors  Quantum Simulators of high Tc superconductors • Abstraction in [Western] music - jazz  Ideology: abstracting from “classicist music”: tonal music  From swing to free jazz and free improvised music
  6. 6. Introduction
  7. 7. Introduction Abstraction: definition from Wikipedia: Abstraction is a process by which concepts are derived from the usage and classification of literal ("real" or "concrete") concepts, first principles, or other methods. "An abstraction" is the product of this process—a concept that acts as a super-categorical noun for all subordinate concepts, and connects any related concepts as a group, field, or category. Abstractions may be formed by reducing the information content of a concept or an observable phenomenon, typically to retain only information which is relevant for a particular purpose. For example, abstracting a leather soccer ball to the more general idea of a ball retains only the information on general ball attributes and behavior, eliminating the other characteristics of that particular ball”.
  8. 8. Abstraction in mathematics • Definition from Wikipedia: “Abstraction in mathematics is the process of extracting the underlying essence of a mathematical concept, removing any dependence on real world objects with which it might originally have been connected, and generalizing it so that it has wider applications or matching among other abstract descriptions of equivalent phenomena”.
  9. 9. Abstraction in mathematics • Equivalence relations: • A given binary relation ~ on a set X is said to be an equivalence relation if and only if it is reflexive, symmetric and transitive. Equivalently, for all a, b and c in X: • a ~ a. (Reflexivity) • if a ~ b then b ~ a. (Symmetry) • if a ~ b and b ~ c then a ~ c. (Transitivity) • Equivalence classes, or classes of abstraction: • The equivalence class, or class of abstraction of a under ~, denoted [a], is defined as [a]={b in X such that b ~ a} • Fundamental concept of math and phys: Examples include quotient spaces in linear algebra, quotient spaces in topology, quotient groups, homogenous spaces, quotient rings, quotient monoids, and the quotient categories. In physics gauge potentials and gauge fields!
  10. 10. Introduction • Modelling in science: ML dixit: is the process of extracting the underlying essence of a real world phenomenon by abstracting from irrelevant details. • Ergo, Modelling = Abstraction
  11. 11. Abstraction in Physics
  12. 12. Abstraction in physics Ideology: abstracting from “classicist model”: reality Reality is very complex and complicated. If we are interested in the essence of things, phenomena etc. we should avoid to try to faithfully describe reality. We should focus on relevant aspects, i.e. abstract from irrelevant ones…
  13. 13. Abstraction in physics: How do we build models? Interesting phenomenon: A pendulum From its discovery in around 1602 by Galileo Galilei, the regular motion of pendulums was used for timekeeping, and was the world's most accurate time- keeping technology until the ‘30s.
  14. 14. Interesting quantum phenomenon: Superconductivity Superconductors are “ideal” conductors, they conduct electric currents without resistance. They conduct strong currents without losses. They can generate strong magnetic fields outside of them, but due to the Meissner- Ochsenfeld effect, they do not let magnetic fields enter them! Unfortunately, superconductors exist only at low temperatures: normally close to absolute zero, -270º Celcius, “high temperature SC” at T>-166º (boiling of liquid nitrogen) The Awesome Levitating Train.
  15. 15. Superconductivity: Theory We (some of us) believe there exist a simple model that captures the phenomenon of high Tc superconductivity, the Hubbard model Unfortunately, even this simple model is far to hard to simulate, and hard to understand with existing computers. So, why not trying to mimick it with atoms…
  16. 16. Simple Hubbard model First band Tunneling On site interactions (Fermi) Hubbard model ∑−+∑ >< +− ↑↓ ∑= ,, .. ,2 1 si isnch sij s b s bJ i n i n i UH µ
  17. 17. Quantum Simulators: Ideology There exist many interesting quantum phenomena (such as superconductivity)  Maybe we can use another, simpler and better controllable quantum system to simulate, understand and control these phenomena (R.P. Feynman)? Such a system would thus work as quantum computer of special purpose, i.e. These phenomena may have important applications! These phenomena are often difficult to describe and understand with the help of standard computers QUANTUM SIMULATOR
  18. 18. 3D Lattice Potential (by courtesy of M. Greiner, O. Mandel, T. Esslinger, I. Bloch, and T. Hänsch) •Resulting potential consists of a simple cubic lattice •BEC coherently populates more than 100,000 lattice sites V0 up to 22 Erecoil wr up to 2p ´ 30 kHz n ⊕ 1-5 atoms on average per site
  19. 19. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices: Simulating quantum many-body physics M. Lewenstein, A. Sanpera, V. Ahufinger, Oxford University Press (2012), reprint-paperback (2017) Quantum simulators
  20. 20. Abstraction in Visual Art
  21. 21. Abstraction in visual art Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” - realism Modern and contemporary art is to a great extend characterized by a departure from classicist art. Reality is very complex and complicated. If we are interested in the essence of things, phenomena etc. we should avoid the faithful reproduction of reality. We should focus on relevant aspects, i.e. abstract from irrelevant ones…
  22. 22. Abstraction in visual art: Realism Leonardo Da Vinci (1452-1519) “La Dama con l’Ermellino” (Lady with Ermine) – a portrait of Cecilia Gallerani, a mistress of Ludovico Sforza il Moro, Duke of Milan, painted in 1488, «quando Ludovico ricevette il prestigioso titolo onorifico di cavaliere dell'Ordine dell'Ermellino dal re di Napoli». In Greek ermellino=galée... This is the only work of Leonardo da Vinci in Poland – in the collection of Muzeum Książąt Czartoryskich in Cracow.
  23. 23. Abstraction in visual art: Impressionism Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” -impressionism “Impressionist painting characteristics include relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles”.
  24. 24. Abstraction in visual art: Impressionism Claude Monet (1840-1926) “Impression, soleil levant” – dated 1872, its subject is the harbour of Le Havre in France, using very loose brush strokes that suggest rather than delineate it. The name of the art movement came from this. Now in Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris
  25. 25. Abstraction in visual art: Cubism Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” - Cubism In Cubist artwork, objects are analyzed, broken up and reassembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context.
  26. 26. Abstraction in visual art: Cubism George Braque (1882-1963) Georges Braque's 1908 “Maisons à l’Estaque” (Houses at L’Estaque) (and related works) prompted the critic Louis Vauxcelles to refer to bizarreries cubiques (cubic oddities). Now in Kunstmuseum, Bern.
  27. 27. Abstraction in visual art: Cubism Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) Picasso’s, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907, considered to be a major step towards the founding of the Cubist movement. The work portrays five nude female prostitutes from a brothel on Carrer d'Avinyó (Avinyó Street) in Barcelona. Now in MoMA.
  28. 28. Abstraction in visual art: Cubism Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) Gertrude Stein referred to landscapes made by Picasso in 1909, such as Reservoir at Horta de Ebro, as the first Cubist paintings. Now in MoMA.
  29. 29. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” – abstract art “Abstract art uses a visual language of form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world”.
  30. 30. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art Piet Mondrian (1872-1944) Pieter Cornelis "Piet" Mondriaan, after 1906 Mondrian, was a Dutch painter. He was an important contributor to the De Stijl art movement and group, which was founded by Theo van Doesburg. He evolved a non-representational form which he termed neoplasticism. This consisted of white ground, upon which was painted a grid of vertical and horizontal black lines and the three primary colors. Composition with Yellow, Blue, and Red, painted between 1937–42, is now in Tate Modern, London.
  31. 31. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935) Kazimir Severinovich Malevich was a Russian painter and art theoretician. He was a pioneer of geometric abstract art and the originator of the avant-garde, Suprematist movement. His parents, Ludwika and Seweryn Malewicz, were ethnic Poles. His native languages were Russian and Polish. In 1927, Malevich traveled to Warsaw where he was given a hero's welcome. Here he met with artists and former students Władysław Strzemiński and Katarzyna Kobro, whose own movement, Unism, was highly influenced by Malevich Black Square, painted after 1916, is now in State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg.
  32. 32. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art Katarzyna Kobro (1898-1951) was a Polish sculptor of Russian, Latvian and German origin. Under the influence of Constructivism she rejected individualism, subjectivism and expressionism, and instead postulated the absolute objectivism of form. Her main aim was to build an abstract work of art, based on universal and objective rules discovered through experimentation and analysis. Present & Correct, from the 1920s, is now in Muzeum Sztuki (Museum of Art) in Łódź.
  33. 33. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Art Władysław Strzemiński (1893-1952) was a Polish constructivist and avant- garde painter of international renown. During the 1920s he formulated his theory of Unism (Unizm in Polish). His Unistic paintings inspired the unistic musical compositions of the Polish composer Zygmunt Krauze. He is an author of a revolutionary book titled "The theory of vision.“ Kompozycja unistyczna 14 (Unist Composition 14), painted in 1934, is in Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź. The last movie of the late great Polish film director, Andrzej Wajda, “Powidoki”, tells the story of Władysław Strzemiński struggling against socrealism in the communist Poland,
  34. 34. Abstraction in visual art Ideology: abstracting from “classicist art” – Abstract Expressionism Abstract Expressionism is an American post–World War II art movement in American painting, developed in New York in the 1940s. It was the first specifically American movement. In Abstract Expressionism the artist expresses himself purely through the use of form and color. It is non-representational, or non- objective, art, which means that there are no actual objects represented. Technically, it has emphasis on spontaneous, automatic or subconscious creation – see Jackson Pollock's dripping paint onto a canvas laid on the floor. Pollock painting (1950).mp4
  35. 35. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Expressionism Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) known as Jackson Pollock, was an influential American painter and a major figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. He was well known for his unique style of drip painting. Autumn Rhythm, painted in 1950, is in Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  36. 36. Abstraction in visual art: Abstract Expressionism Mark Rothko (Latvian: Markus Rotkovičs, Marcus Yakovlevich Rothkowitz; 1903- 1970) was an American painter of Latvian Jewish descent. He is generally identified as an Abstract Expressionist, although he himself rejected this label and even resisted classification as an "abstract painter." With Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, he is one of the most famous postwar American artists. Magenta, Black, Green on Orange, painted in 1953, is in MoMA.
  37. 37. Abstraction in Music - Jazz
  38. 38. Abstraction in music Ideology: abstracting from “classicist music” – tonal and harmonic music Modern and contemporary music is to a great extend characterized by a departure from tonal and harmonic music. Reality is very complex and complicated. If we are interested in the essence of things, phenomena etc. We should avoid the rules of tonality and harmony. We should focus on relevant aspects, i.e. abstract from irrelevant ones…
  39. 39. Abstraction in music Ideology: abstracting from “classicist music” – tonal and harmonic music Tonality is a system/language of music in which specific hierarchical pitch relationships are based on a key "center"—and the root of the tonic triad; that is, on hierarchical relationships between the roots of triads. In music, harmony is the use of simultaneous pitches (tones, notes), or chords. The study of harmony involves chords and their construction and chord progressions and the principles of connection that govern them. Harmony is often said to refer to the "vertical" aspect of music, as distinguished from melodic line, or the "horizontal" aspect
  40. 40. Abstraction in music: Classicist jazz - Swing Swing music, or simply Swing, is a form of American jazz that developed in the early 1930s and became a distinctive style by 1940. Swing uses a strong rhythm section of double bass and drums as the anchor for a lead section of brass instruments such as trumpets and trombones, reeds including saxophones and clarinets, and sometimes stringed instruments such as violin and guitar, medium to fast tempos, and a "lilting" swing time rhythm. The name swing came from the phrase ‘swing feel’ where the emphasis is on the off–beat or weaker pulse in the music (unlike classical music). Swing jazz bands featured soloists who would improvise on the melody over the arrangement. Elements of swing: •Tonality •Harmony •Melody (frequently based in Black American folk – blues, gospels, spirituals) •Rhythm •Swing feeling •Syncopation, a musical effect caused by a syncope, missed beat or off-the-beat stress •Improvisations, respecting the chords progression Alvin “Junior” Raglin on bass Duke Ellington - C Jam Blues (1942).mp4
  41. 41. Abstraction in music: Bebop Bebop or bop is a style of jazz characterized by fast tempo, instrumental virtuosity, and improvisation based on the combination of harmonic structure and melody. It was developed in the early and mid-1940s. Elements of bebop: •Tonality •Advanced harmonies (blue notes, flatted fifth) •Complex melody •Fast rhythm •Rhythmic phrasing (weak beats and off beats, ending phrases on the second half of the fourth beat) •Complex syncopation •Improvisations, respecting altered chords, and chord substitutions ”Billie’s Bounce” (1945): Charlie Parker (as); Miles Davis (t); Dizzy Gillespie (p); Curly Russell (b); Max Roach (dr)
  42. 42. Abstraction in music: Modal Jazz In music, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. A scale ordered by increasing pitch is an ascending scale, while descending scales are ordered by decreasing pitch. Some scales contain different pitches when ascending than when descending (for instance, Chromatic scale and Melodic minor scale). Modal jazz is jazz that uses musical modes (scales) rather than chord progressions as a harmonic framework. Originating in the late 1950s and 1960s, modal jazz is epitomized by Miles Davis's "Milestones" (1958), “Kind of Blue” (1959), and John Coltrane's classic quartet from 1960–64. Elements of modal jazz: •Tonality •Departure from harmony: scales instead of chords •Complex melody •Complex rhythm •Complex syncopation •Improvisations, respecting scales, rather than chords
  43. 43. Abstraction in music: Free Jazz Free jazz is an approach to jazz music that was first developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Though the music produced by free jazz composers varied widely, the common feature was a dissatisfaction with the limitations of bebop, hard bop, and modal jazz, which had developed in the 1940s and 1950s. Each in their own way, free jazz musicians attempted to alter, extend, or break down the conventions of jazz, often by discarding hitherto invariable features of jazz, such as fixed chord changes or tempos. While usually considered experimental and avant-garde, free jazz has also oppositely been conceived as an attempt to return jazz to its "primitive", often religious roots, and emphasis on collective improvisations. Elements of modal jazz: •Departure from tonality •Departure from harmony: collective improvisation •Complex themes, if any •Complex rhythm and syncopation - pulsation •Improvisations, not respecting any rules, totally free; often collective Freddie Hubbard – trumpet, Dewey Johnson – trumpet, Marion Brown – alto saxophone, John Tchicai – alto saxophone, John Coltrane – tenor saxophone, Pharoah Sanders – tenor saxophone, Archie Shepp – tenor saxophone McCoy Tyner – piano, Art Davis – bass, Jimmy Garrison – bass, Elvin Jones – drums
  44. 44. Abstraction in music: Free Improvised Jazz/Music Free improvisation or free music is improvised music without any rules beyond the logic or inclination of the musician(s) involved. The term can refer to both a technique (employed by any musician in any genre) and as a recognizable genre in its own right. Free improvisation, as a genre of music, developed in the U.S. and Europe in the mid to late 1960s, largely as an outgrowth of free jazz and modern classical music. None of its primary exponents can be said to be famous amongst the general public; however, in experimental circles, a number of free musicians are well known, including saxophonists Evan Parker, Anthony Braxton, John Zorn and Peter Brötzmann, trombonist George Lewis, guitarist Derek Bailey and the improvising groups The Art Ensemble of Chicago and AMM. More recently, Barry Guy, Ken Vandermark, … Agustí Fernández is one of the world leaders. Elements of free improvised jazz: •Total freedom BARRY GUY AUGUSTI FERNÁNDEZ RAMÓN LÓPEZ TRIO - Rec. by DTS Studio.mp4
  45. 45. ICFO-QOT Progress Status Workshop Barcelona 18-20 March 2015 Miscellanea
  46. 46. The Concert - Free Improvised Music Vasco Trilla El Pricto

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