Ciid day2 interface-p_comp

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  • What is an interface?
  • What is an interface? - No matter what they're called, interfaces boil down to a format and language that defines the services one system is capable of delivering to another. - We’d like to maintain a bit broader definition, such as a surface or layer regarded as the boundary between any two objects or spaces.
  • Good interfaces usually have a clear input that yields a direct output.
  • That is, a tool converts what we can do into what we want to do . A great tool is designed to fit both sides.
  • So whereas the telephone might be the tool that augments our ability to communicate with each other over distances, the touch-tone or rotary dial is the interface that allows us to place a call. The receiver handle is the interface that allows us to hear and speak to the other person.
  • Forms of input and output can be similar. For instance, interfaces can allow information to flow in as an input as well as an output.
  • Jim Campbell has a tongue-in-cheek animation on the possible types of inputs and outputs that go into making an interactive art installation.
  • Jim Campbell has a tongue-in-cheek animation on the possible types of inputs and outputs that go into making an interactive art installation.
  • A doorknob. How might this tell you how to use it?
  • As opposed to this?
  • Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC and saw Douglas Englebart's 3 button wooden mouse
  • It was the basis for the mouse Apple designed. In order to make it cheaper to manufacture, they changed it from a 3 button to a 1 button interface.
  • You used to type in commands to a computer, all the interaction was text based. This is a screenshot from This is Neptune, the Xerox Alto file manager. It is fairly well accepted that the Xerox Alto is where the world of GUIs all began. Using the mouse you can select different drives or directories, select or unselect individual files, and initiate an action by clicking the "start" button. The screenshot on the right is Macintosh System 1. Macintosh System 1 - while not the first operating system that used a Graphical User Interface, it was the most successful.  The OS used a desktop metaphor that included folders, and a trash barrel. In you are not a gagdet, Jaron Lanier, proposes the question of what might a computer GUI look like if the desktop and folder metaphor had not taken hold.
  • Github as a command line interface, one of the main ways non Linux users might use a command line interface, or terminal, to talk to their computer. There are also GUI programs to help you use git and version control, like this Github for Mac gui that allows you to see the differences in a code project over time using color - red for something that was taken away, green for something that was added.
  • A tangible user interface ( TUI ) is a user interface in which a person interacts with digital information through the physical environment . T he initial name was Graspable User Interface, which no longer is used. Durrell Bishop, The Marble Answering Machine, 1992. Master’s Thesis at RCA. Many site as the first TUI example.
  • Reactable. The Reactable is an electronic musical instrument with a tabletop Tangible User Interface that has been developed with in the Music Technology Group at the Universitat Pompeu Fab ra in Barcelona . Björk 's 2007 world tour supporting her 2007 release Volta us ed the instrument in several songs
  • Are glasses an interface? Are they a tool? Are they an extension of ourselves?
  • Assistive Technology
  • Prosthetics
  • Difference between a fork and a spork-knife combo. How does the shape affect the way the object will be used.
  • The word "affordance" was originally invented by the perceptual psychologist J. J. Gibson (1977, 1979) to refer to the actionable properties between the world and an actor (a person or animal). The quality of an object allowing an action-relationship with an actor. To Gibson, affordances are a relationship. They are a part of nature: they do not have to be visible, known, or desirable. -- Donald A. Norman: http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/affordances_and.html
  • In product design, where one deals with real, physical objects, there can be both real and perceived affordances, and the two need not be the same. In graphical, screen-based interfaces, all that the designer has available is control over perceived affordances. The real question is about the perceived affordance: Does the user perceive that clicking on that location is a meaningful, useful action to perform?
  • In product design, where one deals with real, physical objects, there can be both real and perceived affordances, and the two need not be the same. In graphical, screen-based interfaces, all that the designer has available is control over perceived affordances. The real question is about the perceived affordance: Does the user perceive that clicking on that location is a meaningful, useful action to perform?
  • The construction of the "Type Writer" had two flaws that made the product susceptible to jams. Firstly, characters were mounted on metal arms or typebars , which would clash and jam if neighboring arms were pressed at the same time or in rapid succession. [4] Seco ndl y, its printing point was located beneath the paper carriage, invisible to the operator, a so-called "up-stroke" design. Consequently, jams were especially serious, because the typist could only discover the mishap by raising the carriage to inspect what he had typed. The solution was to place commonly used letter-pairs (like "th" or "st") so that their typebars were not neighboring, avoiding jams. Contrary to popular belief, [5] the QWE RTY layout was not designed to slow the typist down, [6] but rather to speed up typing by preventing jams. [4][7] (There is als o e vid ence that, aside from the issue of jamming, keys being further apart increases typing speed on its own, because it encourages alternation between the hands. [ citation needed ] ) Almos t every word in the English language contains at least one vowel, but on the QWERTY keyboard only the vowel "A" is located on the home row, which requires the typist's fingers to leave the home row for most words.
  • Nest Thermostat. By now, Nest has made a schedule for your home that’s helping you save energy. Change the temperature a few days in a row and Nest will catch on, but one-off adjustments won’t confuse it.
  • GlowCap reminds you to take your medication if you forget. Knows if the pill bottle has been opened or not. Light and sound notifications from the GlowCap® escalate from subtle to insistent: devices glow, then make noise, then send a text notification or dial your home phone.
  • Apple iOS debate. Skeumorphic vs. "Flat" design
  • A layer or boundary between two bodies or surfaces/spaces. Usually a site of exchange, energy, respiration, etc.
  • OSMOSIS Osmosis is the spontaneous net movement of solvent molecules through a partially permeab le membra ne into a region of higher solute concentra tion, in the direction that tends to equalize the solute concentrations on the two sides. [1][2][3] It may also be use d t o d esc ribe a physical process in which any solvent moves, without input of energy, [4] across a semipermeable memb ran e (permeable to the solvent , but not the solute) separ ating t wo solutions of different concentrations. [5] Although osmosis does not require inp ut of energy, it does use kinetic energy [6] and can be made to do wor k. [7]
  • Alvioli, site of exchange between humans and atmosphere. O2 in, CO2 out.
  • Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the sun , into chemical energy that can be used to fuel the organisms' activities.
  • Ciid day2 interface-p_comp

    1. 1. INTERFACE S CIID 2013 Exploring Biomimetic Interfaces Gabriella Levine + Genevieve Hoffman
    2. 2. INTERFACE S What is an interface?
    3. 3. POINT OF INTERACTION An action should yield a result
    4. 4. TOOLS VS. INTERFACES A tool addresses human needs by amplifying human capabilities. - Bret Victor
    5. 5. TOOLS VS. INTERFACES An interface is the layer between an input and an output, the interpretation between two systems
    6. 6. THE LAYER BETWEEN: INFORMATION ACTIONS DATA MOTION CHEMICAL PHYSICAL MECHANICAL PROCESS INFORMATION ACTIONS DATA MOTION CHEMICAL PHYSICAL MECHANICAL PROCESS WHAT IS AN INTERFACE?
    7. 7. JIM CAMPBELL’S COMPUTER ART DIAGRAM
    8. 8. JIM CAMPBELL’S LED INSTALLATIONS
    9. 9. PHYSICAL INTERFACES
    10. 10. PHYSICAL INTERFACES
    11. 11. PHYSICAL INTERFACES
    12. 12. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
    13. 13. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
    14. 14. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
    15. 15. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
    16. 16. TANGIBLE USER INTERFACE Link to Video
    17. 17. TANGIBLE USER INTERFACE
    18. 18. WEARABLE USER INTERFACE
    19. 19. WEARABLE USER INTERFACE
    20. 20. WEARABLE USER INTERFACE
    21. 21. AffordancesAFFORDANCES A common understanding of how an item should be used.
    22. 22. AffordancesAFFORDANCES
    23. 23. Affordances Don Norman, The Design of Everyday Objects: video AFFORDANCES
    24. 24. Affordances as Vestigial Qualities in Product Design AFFORDANCES vs STANDARDS Vestigial qualities of designed products?
    25. 25. Smart Interfaces “SMART INTERFACES”
    26. 26. Smart Interfaces “SMART INTERFACES”
    27. 27. SKEUMORPHIS M Designing digital interfaces to resemble their analog or physical precursors.
    28. 28. WHAT IS A BIOMIMETIC INTERFACE?
    29. 29. CELL MEMBRANE - OSMOSIS
    30. 30. ALVIOLI - RESPIRATION
    31. 31. LEAF - PHOTOSYNTHESIS
    32. 32. GECKO FEET
    33. 33. PHYSICAL PHYSICAL
    34. 34. DIGITAL DIGITAL
    35. 35. PHYSICAL DIGITAL
    36. 36. PERSONAL PERSONAL
    37. 37. PERSONAL OBJECT
    38. 38. OBJECT OBJECT
    39. 39. WORLD INTERNET
    40. 40. Sends and Receives Data
    41. 41. Analog Interfaces
    42. 42. Human - Computer Interfaces Keyboard Mouse Touchscreen Kinect
    43. 43. Visibility Designed objects should have visible cues to hint at how they are supposed to work. What are biomimetic examples of visual cues that reference how animals move, or plants grow? which direction plant leaves face - in order to maximize the amount of sunlight, etc. Norman calls it "natural design"
    44. 44. Materiality What materials lend themselves to different applications?
    45. 45. Is the future Touch Screens?
    46. 46. Feedback Loop from Wired Article Provide people with information about their actions in real time (or something close to it), then give them an opportunity to change those actions, pushing them toward better behaviors. Action, information, reaction. A feedback loop involves four distinct stages. First comes the data: A behavior must be measured, captured, and stored. This is the evidence stage. Second, the information must be relayed to the individual, not in the raw-data form in which it was captured but in a context that makes it emotionally resonant. This is the relevance stage. But even compelling information is useless if we don’t know what to make of it, so we need a third stage: consequence. The information must illuminate one or more paths ahead. And finally, the fourth stage: action. There must be a clear moment when the individual can recalibrate a behavior, make a choice, and act. Then that action is measured, and the feedback loop can run once more, every action stimulating new behaviors that inch us closer to our goals. Norbert Wiener expanded on this work in the 1940s, devising the field of cybernetics, which analyzed how feedback loops operate in machinery and electronics and explored how those principles might be broadened to human systems. The true power of feedback loops is not to control people but to give them control. The ideal feedback loop gives us an emotional connection to a rational goal.
    47. 47. Types of Interaction 1 - to - 1: A direct input yields a specific output

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