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Experiencing digital accessibility using your smartphone (Bristol ID&D, June 2019)

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Getting your own experience of accessibility helps you to put yourself in the shoes of others and keep accessibility in mind when designing and developing. Find out how you can easily experience accessibility for yourself using something you likely have in your pocket – a smartphone.

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Experiencing digital accessibility using your smartphone (Bristol ID&D, June 2019)

  1. 1. Bristol ID&D 3 June 2019 Jon Gibbins .j { } Dotjay Ltd
  2. 2. Photo credits: LG, Gould, Larson, DiC, Apple
  3. 3. Photo credit: Jon Gibbins with thanks to Drake Music Project
  4. 4. “Getting your own experience of accessibility helps you to put yourself in the shoes of others and keep accessibility in mind when building and testing your sites and applications” – Jon Gibbins, Nov 2007
  5. 5. Don’t you mean sympathy?
  6. 6. Most of us have a connection to accessibility
  7. 7. Ageing
  8. 8. is about understanding people
  9. 9. is about understanding people and the barriers that they face
  10. 10. is about understanding disabled people and the barriers that they face
  11. 11. …is a human right
  12. 12. …is just good design
  13. 13. 4 main disability types
  14. 14. • Speech output (screen readers) • Braille output • Magnification • Voice input • Switch access
  15. 15. • Captions • Subtitles • Audio description • Sign language interpretation
  16. 16. Mobile experiences
  17. 17. Why mobile accessibility?
  18. 18. Mobile accessibility features
  19. 19. 2 main interaction methods
  20. 20. • • • Interaction methods 1. Explore by touch
  21. 21. • • • Interaction methods 2. Gesture navigation
  22. 22. …you do
  23. 23. • • • • • •
  24. 24. CAPS • Harder to read (dyslexia) • Capitals can cause different reading by screen readers, even shouting
  25. 25. Emphasis “Skip to content” vs “Skip to main content” “con tent” vs “con tent”
  26. 26. Hyphenation iOS enewsletter “ehneyewsleta” = ˌe njuːsletər (sounds Russian) e-newsletter “ee newsletter” = ˈiːnuːzˌletər (correct) Android enewsletter “eh newsletter” = ˌenuːzˌletər (wrong “e” sound) e-newsletter “ee newsletter” = ˈiːnuːzˌletər (correct)
  27. 27. Compound words Compound words are commonplace • Homepage • Sitemap • "Signup" announced as "sig–nup" in VoiceOver iOS Spaces and hyphens are your friends.
  28. 28. Read / Reading “Reeding” vs “Redding” <h2>Get reading</h2> = “Get Redding” <a href="#">Read more</a> = “Red more”
  29. 29. Date format ambiguity, clarity (e.g. US versus UK) 01 03 2015 could be “1st of March” …or “3rd of January”
  30. 30. …It really needn’t be
  31. 31. • • • • • • Tips
  32. 32. • • • • Next steps
  33. 33. • • • • Thanks!
  34. 34. 67
  35. 35. • • https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/ • • https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/Techniques/ • • https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/Understanding/ • • https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/Understanding/conf ormance • • https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/quickref/ References

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