Canol Road 2013

216 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
216
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Canol Road 2013

  1. 1. The wonder and beauty of the boreal winter In March 2013, Pew’s Arctic Science Director Henry Huntington headed for the boreal forest with fourfriends to explore the Canol Road, built during World War II to support a pipeline connecting the Norman Wells oilfields on the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories with the new Alaska Highway in the Yukon. Here are some of the things they saw on their 1300 km/800 mile trip.
  2. 2. The Yukon section of the Canolis maintained for summer use as a gravel road.
  3. 3. Not so on the NWT side, withthe result that we could notquite reach Norman Wells …
  4. 4. Even without maintenance, the road andequipment are still visible, seventy years later
  5. 5. The trip was wonderful, if cold (-42°C/-44°F was our low, and it was often in the -30s)
  6. 6. We traveledfrom the pines of the South Canol to thespruce, tamarack, willow, and poplar there and farther north
  7. 7. Not forgetting the ambitiousspruce high on the slopes, and willows on a high plateau
  8. 8. Plus lots of animals! Winter is a great time for tracks. Clockwise from upper left:wolverine, snowshoe hare, wolf,caribou, moose, porcupine, fox, least weasel
  9. 9. Fortunately, the bears werestill hibernating, but they left scratch marks on trees and fur in the spruce sap
  10. 10. And theptarmigan, one of my favorites!
  11. 11. The ice and snow are also beautiful, delicate, and complex
  12. 12. The sky offers its own spectacles night andday, from aurora to sun dogs
  13. 13. May the boreal long continue to inspire and delight us,and may human presence remain light and respectful
  14. 14. From left: Glen Liston, John Burch, Jon Holmgren, Matthew Sturm, Henry Huntington

×