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Orchestration: Making Your Digital Marketing Work in Context

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The top transformational problem in marketing is no longer "how to be digital." Now, the most significant problem is how to coordinate and integrate fragmented activities into a coherent customer experience. In short, the new goal is orchestration. View the discussion of what we, as digital marketers managing a plethora of tactics, can learn from the idea of classical orchestration. Using analogies from music theory and examples from classical to pop, this session demonstrates how to create an integrated marketing strategy, proving that the whole of your marketing can equal more than the sum of its parts.

Read this recap: https://www.slideshare.net/OneNorthInteractive/orchestration-making-your-digital-marketing-work-in-context

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Orchestration: Making Your Digital Marketing Work in Context

  1. 1. Kalev Peekna Chief Strategist One North Orchestration Conducting effective cross-channel content
  2. 2. Let’s Listen to Some Music
  3. 3. What Kind of Song is This?
  4. 4. Là ci darem la mano – Mozart, Don Giovanni (Don Giovanni) Là ci darem la mano, Là mi dirai di sì: Vedi, non è lontano, Partiam, ben mio, da qui. (Zerlina) Vorrei e non vorrei, Mi trema un poco il cor, Felice, è ver, sarei, Ma può burlarmi ancor! (Don Giovanni) Vieni, mio bel diletto! (Zerlina) Mi fa pietà Masetto. (Don Giovanni) Io cangierò tua sorte. (Zerlina) Presto... non son più forte. (Don Giovanni) Andiam! (Zerlina) Andiam! (Duet) Andiam, andiam, mio bene, a ristorar le pene D’un innocente amor. (Don Giovanni) There I’ll give you my hand There you’ll say yes: See, it is not far, my love, let’s leave from here (Zerlina) Should I or shouldn’t I, my heart trembles at the thought, it’s true, I would be happy, I can still have fun! (Don Giovanni) Come, my beloved beautiful! (Zerlina) It makes me pity Masetto (Don Giovanni) I will change your fate. (Zerlina) Soon… I am no longer strong enough to resist (Don Giovanni) Let’s go! (Zerlina) Let’s go! (Duet) Come, come, my darling, to restore our pleasure of an innocent love.
  5. 5. Let’s Try That Again
  6. 6. What Kind of Song is This?
  7. 7. Havana (feat Young Thug), Camila Cabello Havana, ooh na-na (ay) Half of my heart is in Havana, ooh-na-na (ay, ay) He took me back to East Atlanta, na-na-na Oh, but my heart is in Havana (ay) There's somethin' 'bout his manners (uh huh) Havana, ooh na-na (uh) He didn't walk up with that "how you doin'?" (uh) (When he came in the room) He said there's a lot of girls I can do with (uh) (But I can't without you) I knew him forever in a minute (hey) (That summer night in June) And papa says he got malo in him (uh) He got me feelin' like Ooh-ooh-ooh, I knew it when I met him I loved him when I left him Got me feelin' like Ooh-ooh-ooh, and then I had to tell him I had to go, oh na-na-na-na-na Havana, ooh na-na (ay, ay) Half of my heart is in Havana, ooh-na-na (ay, ay) He took me back to East Atlanta, na-na-na (uh huh) Oh, but my heart is in Havana (ay) My heart is in Havana (ay) Havana, ooh na-na [Rap] Just graduated, fresh on campus, mm Fresh out East Atlanta with no manners, damn Fresh out East Atlanta Bump on her bumper like a traffic jam Hey, I was quick to pay that girl like Uncle Sam (here you go, ay) Back it on me, shawty cravin' on me Get to diggin' on me (on me) She waited on me (then what?) Shawty cakin' on me, got the bacon on me (wait up) This is history in the makin' on me (on me) Point blank, close range, that be If it cost a million, that's me (that's me) I was gettin' mula, man they feel me Havana, ooh na-na (ay, ay) Half of my heart is in Havana, ooh-na-na (oh, ay, ay) He took me back to East Atlanta, na-na-na (oh no) Oh, but my heart is in Havana (ay) My heart is in Havana (ay) …
  8. 8. Comparing Mozart & Camila Havana, Camila Cabello • Catchy, very danceable • Consistent dynamics • Common “pop” structure: • Verse, Hook (“chorus”) X 2 • Instrumental/Rap -> Bridge • Hook Meaning is in the lyrics - The rest is just fun Mozart, Là ci darem la mano • Full instrumentation • Modulated dynamics & melody • Lyrical structure tied to dramatic moment • Call-response duet grows closer • Finishes in unison Meaning is orchestrated across the entire performance
  9. 9. What Does this Have to Do with LMA?
  10. 10. Digital Strategy in “We need to start using…” 1995 2001 2003 2004 2007 2008 2010 2011 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 The Web Video Email/CRM Blogs Mobile App/Web Social Media SEO (begrudgingly) Responsive Design Native Advertising VR/AR Personalization Data Artificial Intelligence
  11. 11. You Don’t Need Any More Tactics Over the years, “digital strategy” meant assembling an ever- expanding range of tactics. B2B marketers now average active use of: • 5 different technologies Source: B2B Content Marketing: 2018 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends – North America. 22% 24% 43% 55% 63% 70% 87% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Content Workflow System Video Tool Webinar Platform Marketing Automation Content Management System Email Marketing Analytics Tools Technologies Used
  12. 12. You Don’t Need Any More Tactics Over the years, “digital strategy” meant assembling an ever- expanding range of tactics. B2B marketers now average active use of: • 5 different technologies • 7 types of content Source: B2B Content Marketing: 2018 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends – North America. 17% 33% 37% 56% 65% 71% 72% 73% 94% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Podcasts Interactive Tools Research Reports Illustrations Infographics White Papers Videos Case Studies Social Media Types of Content
  13. 13. You Don’t Need Any More Tactics Over the years, “digital strategy” meant assembling an ever- expanding range of tactics. B2B marketers now average active use of: • 5 different technologies • 7 types of content • 5 different formats Source: B2B Content Marketing: 2018 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends – North America. 24% 27% 55% 56% 79% 92% 93% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Print Microsites Webinars In-person Events Blogs Social Post Email Formats
  14. 14. Yet We Don’t Talk About ROI No 46% Yes 36% Unsure 18%B2B content marketers still don’t talk about clear ROI, mostly because they don’t know how. “Do you report on ROI for your content marketing activities?” Source: B2B Content Marketing: 2018 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends – North America.
  15. 15. Marketing Orchestration Is a Top Challenge The top transformational problem in marketing is no longer “how to be digital.” According to Forrester Research, the top problem is about how to coordinate and integrate fragmented activities into a coherent customer experience. In short, the new goal is orchestration. 18% 18% 17% 14% 13% 13% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Long-term Relationships Cross-channel Experience Which are your marketing organization’s top three goals? First Second Third Source: Commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of Responsys, 2013
  16. 16. Marketing Orchestration An approach that focuses not on delivering standalone messages, but instead on optimizing a set of related cross-channel interactions that, when added together, make up a personalized customer experience.
  17. 17. So, How Do We Do That? A typical consultant would break it down into set of best practices using a model like the 3 P’s. Or is it 4 P’s? Or is it 6 P’s? Or is it 3 P’s? Best practices lead to competence, not innovation. LOL NOPE
  18. 18. Let’s Start by Exploring Orchestration When the goal is truly innovative, or otherwise not completely clear, a different approach often works better. Design-oriented thinkers typically start by creating a clear vision of the future state, and then back into analysis of what it takes to get there. Score Which melody Instrumentation What plays Dynamics How loud Cadence What beat Audience For whom
  19. 19. Score
  20. 20. Score is Your Brand For a digital marketer, brand represents the core of what you do – the score you intend to play. In both music and marketing, the score is both the guide and the unifying force pulling every action into a coherent experience.
  21. 21. Music Has Changed… but Scoring Hasn’t Much ca. 1400 ca. 1790 ca. 2018
  22. 22. …But How We Execute Has Changed Digital hasn’t changed how we define brands, or even the end goal of brand. But it has changed almost everything about how we execute. Brand Idea: Brand Persona: Brand Strategy: Communications Strategy: Tactics: Overall Customer Experience: Essence and Purpose Voice, Brand DNA, and Actions Activating the persona in order to achieve an outcome What we will say and when Logistics of executing the strategy The foundation of everything; the only thing that really matters
  23. 23. How Digital Has Changed Brand Activation Digital has changed completely the contexts in which we experience brands. New channels, platforms, and content types have all disrupted traditional tactics by which marketers create brand experiences. Digital is now the first, and often the most important, experience our clients and customers have of our brand. There are two more fundamental challenges that digital has posed to traditional brand planning: • Natively digital brand systems • Brand-integrated content
  24. 24. Natively Digital Brand Systems We know the usual visual brand architecture of logos, colors, and typefaces. Digital brand systems extend that framework to include: • UI patterns • Motion & animation • Transitions • Video • Interactive content
  25. 25. Digital Brand Systems Forward-leaning brands develop expression systems that place digital at the center of the design language: • BBC Global Experience Language • Google Material Design • IBM Design Language These systems are critical to ensuring visual/UI consistency across multiple contexts, both digital and analog.
  26. 26. Avoiding Brand Fade Digital has not only changed the look and feel of our brands; it has also undermined our ability to rely solely on visuals to create brand associations. Cross-channel “success” for digital content leads it farther away from marketing- controlled contexts. Brand associations must be inside the content itself.
  27. 27. Brand-Integrated (Not Edited) Content Integrating brand associations into content requires more than sharp editing. Tone and style are important, but so too are the themes, formats, narrative approach, and even target audiences – aspects decided without marketing guidance. TED@BCG: Though there is no “traditional” visual brand framework, the brand associations are clear – and apparent even as the content is shared throughout other digital networks.
  28. 28. But: Score Is Only the Start
  29. 29. Instrumentation
  30. 30. Your Tactics Are Your Instruments The same notes can be played by many different instruments. Similarly, the same content can be deployed across a range of channels. Good orchestrators know the voice of each instrument, and choose which ones, and how many, to assemble.
  31. 31. New Choices Aren’t Always Good Choices The Classical and Romantic periods saw a rapid expansion in orchestral instrumentation, especially in areas like brass, woodwinds, and percussion. But not every maestro used every new instrument in their work. Most took the opportunity to choose selectively depending on the mood and intended setting. (Except maybe Wagner)
  32. 32. Digital Marketing “Explosion” Choice paralysis is still one of the biggest issues for digital marketers who are evaluating their tactics. We are littered with “helpful” infographics that illustrate the problem. Source: Scott Brinker https://chiefmartec.com/2017/05/marketing-techniology-landscape-supergraphic-2017/
  33. 33. Choice Expansion Continues For Digital But real guidance is thin on the ground. Not even respected thought leaders like Gartner always succeed in clarifying the situation. Source: https://www.gartner.com/technology/research/digital-marketing/transit-map/transit-map-guest.jsp
  34. 34. Stable Patterns Are Emerging We now have a better understanding of which tactics are effective for different kinds of content. Usage of social, for example, hasn’t really changed in 3 years.
  35. 35. New Tactics Require Strategic Evaluation Digital marketing innovation isn’t slowing down. When new tactics emerge, they should be evaluated not just for potential reach, but also for brand alignment and authenticity. For example, native advertising is an attractive paid option for many B2B content marketers. But overall effectiveness depends on more than engagement and exposure.
  36. 36. Dynamics
  37. 37. Variety Gives You Dynamics Dynamics refers to how musicians use loudness and softness. Too loud or too soft leads to audience fatigue. Good marketing orchestrators don’t “amplify” everything – they use modulation and variety to retain interest.
  38. 38. Amplification Is Good. Sometimes. Marketing amplification means different things to different “experts” (often based on what they’re trying to sell you). At the core, it refers to the simple desire to ensure that your marketing efforts are heard widely and loudly. Musicians often feel the same way. Enter the cannonball.
  39. 39. What’s Your Cannonball? In B2B marketing, the “cannonball” is the Big Campaign, centered around a key piece of thought leadership created and distributed as a “publication.”
  40. 40. Not That There’s Anything Wrong With That. Key campaigns can be “natively digital” and often represent the best of our cross- channel marketing. Sometimes you need a cannonball to get someone’s attention. But they require work – work to produce, work to promote, and work to consume. And they can’t be relevant to all users at the same time.
  41. 41. Arranging “Loud” and “Soft” Pieces Together Most of us have the variety we need – longer articles, shorter updates, social, infographics, etc. – but most still arrange and publish our content separately according to type. Arranging content according to user-relevant topics, not by type or format, builds engagement for the long term. The “cannonballs” are still there to help get attention, but variety of length and format fills in the gaps and develops more interest.
  42. 42. Cadence
  43. 43. Cadence The Cadence of a song can lend it a specific mood, or mark it for a specific purpose (like dancing). But it also is what allows multiple performers and instruments to stay synchronized. Knowing your cadence is the key to staying on-beat.
  44. 44. Know this Beat?
  45. 45. Pop Music Knows the Importance of a Beat Top producers can charge, before royalties, anywhere from $50K to $300K for just the baseline of a new hit song – without lyrics, melody, or studio production. This is Timbaland… …after earning $250K for one Aaliyah song... This is Justin… …after paying the bill for “SexyBack”
  46. 46. Keeping the Beat With a Documented Calendar Editorial calendars – tools that plan out the what, when, and where of content distribution – are widely recognized as an important tool. Yet few B2B marketers document any part of their strategy. Yes, documented 37% Yes, not documented 38% No 6% No, but have a plan 19% Do you have a content strategy? Source: B2B Content Marketing: 2018 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends – North America. 67% Of B2B marketers who rate themselves as “highly effective” have a documented content strategy.
  47. 47. Editorial Calendars Are Your Baseline There are many examples of editorial calendars to follow. Most are matrices that simply give you a plan for arranging: • Channels • Topics • Formats • Workflow • Timing
  48. 48. Specific Timing Is an Important Part Understanding timing begins with knowing when to meet users on their own terms. This is especially important when communicating globally. User research shows that constructing the proper context drives engagement. Ignorance of context can hurt you. Source: Pure 360 Source: Hubspot
  49. 49. Arrange Timing to Create a Cadence Developing a true cadence is about more than just timing individual pieces. It’s about arranging pieces to carry key themes across time and get the most ROI from each content investment. PwC Annual Global CEO Survey Pre-launch Launch Post-launch
  50. 50. Audience
  51. 51. From Audiences to Users Digital strategists tend to talk about users, not audiences, even when focused on marketing. This is because digital is inherently participatory; unlike the “audiences” of traditional marketing, digital demands you offer your users a specific role to play.
  52. 52. Audiences Love to Sing-Along If You Let Them Whether listening to a concert or looking at our advertisements, the traditional “audiences” are increasingly irrelevant in digital media. Digital users want to sing too. In December 2017, Chicago celebrated its 42nd annual “Do It Yourself Messiah.” All choral parts are sung by the audience, not professional singers. Each trains on the music and sings an assigned part. https://youtu.be/aWruieoZcF0
  53. 53. User Participation Shouldn’t Make You Nervous When someone mentions “user participation,” marketers get anxious. 10 years ago, user participation usually meant some kind of user-generated content, or at least comments and/or ratings. And we all know comments attract the most dreaded of all digital monsters, the troll.
  54. 54. There’s a Reason Comments Don’t Work There’s reason people call comments the “bottom half of the internet.” Many media outlets (and B2B marketers) have shut them down altogether. So why do comments elicit either trolls or complete silence? Because when you ask for a “comment” you aren’t asking for participation. You’re asking for a critique.
  55. 55. New Models for User Participation As in the “Do It Yourself Messiah,” true participation depends on shared goals and purpose. Newer models for digital user participation are more structured, guided, and ultimately useful for both user and brand. Medium.com Kindle iOS app
  56. 56. User Participation Can Guide More Than Output Good marketers research their audiences. Great marketers research their users. Extraordinary marketers invite users to help design their efforts. Participatory Design Methods Card Sorting Affinity Mapping Prototype Walkthroughs/Testing Focus/Ideation Groups
  57. 57. Coda
  58. 58. Three things you should know about Estonia It’s natively digital The language is… weird Estonians are nuts about singing Jäääär Kuuuurija Töööö / Öötöö Häid Jõule NO GENDER NO FUTURE 27 VOWEL SOUNDS 14 CASES 3 LENGTHS TUNED FOR GOSSIPING
  59. 59. Welcome to the Singing Revolution https://youtu.be/bm4EC01u0-4 >
  60. 60. Thank You!
  61. 61. Learning Outcomes • To understand the concept of “marketing orchestration” and how an integrated approach can create better experiences for your target audiences • To recognize how various marketing tactics belong in particular contexts, rather than as stand-alone campaigns • To understand how great experiences integrate brand throughout, rather than treat brand identity as an add-on • To consider and apply the experience of the user to enhance your overall strategy

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