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Control structure

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Control structure

  1. 1.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 1 Outline 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Algorithms 4.3 Pseudocode 4.4 Control Structures 4.5 if Single-Selection Statement 4.6 if else Selection Statement 4.7 while Repetition Statement 4.11 Compound Assignment Operators 4.12 Increment and Decrement Operators 4.13 Primitive Types Chapter 4 - Control Structures: Part 1
  2. 2.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 2 4.1 Introduction • We learn about Control Structures – Structured-programming principle – Control structures help build and manipulate objects (Chapter 8)
  3. 3.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 3 4.2 Algorithms • Algorithm – Series of actions in specific order • The actions executed • The order in which actions execute • Program control – Specifying the order in which actions execute • Control structures help specify this order
  4. 4.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 4 4.3 Pseudocode • Pseudocode – Informal language for developing algorithms – Not executed on computers – Helps developers “think out” algorithms
  5. 5.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 5 4.4 Control Structures • Sequential execution – Program statements execute one after the other • Transfer of control – Three control structures can specify order of statements • Sequence structure (default) • Selection structure • Repetition structure • Activity diagram – Models the workflow (flowchart) • Action-state symbols • Transition arrows
  6. 6.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 6 Fig 4.1 Sequence structure activity diagram. add grade to total add 1 to counter Corresponding Java statement: total = total + grade; Corresponding Java statement: counter = counter + 1;
  7. 7.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 7 Java Keywords abstract assert boolean break byte case catch char class continue default do double else extends final finally float for if implements import instanceof int interface long native new package private protected public return short static strictfp super switch synchronized this throw throws transient try void volatile while Keywords that are reserved, but not currently used const goto Fig. 4.2 Java keywords.
  8. 8.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 8 4.4 Control Structures • Java has a sequence structure “built-in” • Java provides three selection structures – if – if…else – switch • Java provides three repetition structures – while – do…while – for • Each of these words is a Java keyword
  9. 9.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 9 4.5 if Single-Selection Statement • Single-entry/single-exit control structure • Perform action only when condition is true • Action/decision programming model
  10. 10.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 10 Fig 4.3 if single-selections statement activity diagram. [grade >= 60] [grade < 60] print “Passed” if (studentGrade >= 60) { System.out.println (“Passed”); }
  11. 11.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 11 4.6 if…else Selection Statement • Perform action only when condition is true • Perform different specified action when condition is false • Conditional operator (?:) • Nested if…else selection structures
  12. 12.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 12 Fig 4.4 if…else double-selections statement activity diagram. [grade >= 60] [grade < 60] print “Failed” print “Passed” if (studentGrade >= 60) { System.out.println (“Passed”); } else { System.out.println (“Failed”); }
  13. 13.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 13 System.out.println (studentGrade >= 60 ? “Passed”: “Failed”); Conditional Operator (?:)
  14. 14.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 14 Nested if…else selection structures if (studentGrade >= 90) System.out.println (“A”); else if (studentGrade >= 80) System.out.println (“B”); else if (studentGrade >= 70) System.out.println (“C”); else if (studentGrade >= 60) System.out.println (“D”); else System.out.println (“F”);
  15. 15.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 15 4.7 while Repetition Statement • Repeat action while condition remains true • Condition should eventually become false (or never-ending loop)
  16. 16.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 16 Fig 4.5 while repetition statement activity diagram. [product <= 1000] [product > 1000] double product value merge decision Corresponding Java statement: product = 2 * product; while (product <= 1000) { product = 2 * product; }
  17. 17.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 17 4.11 Compound Assignment Operators • Assignment Operators – Abbreviate assignment expressions – Any statement of form • variable = variable operator expression; – Can be written as • variable operator= expression; – e.g., addition assignment operator += • c = c + 3 – can be written as • c += 3
  18. 18.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 18 Assignment operator Sample expression Explanation Assigns Assume: int c = 3, d = 5, e = 4, f = 6, g = 12; += c += 7 c = c + 7 10 to c -= d -= 4 d = d - 4 1 to d *= e *= 5 e = e * 5 20 to e /= f /= 3 f = f / 3 2 to f %= g %= 9 g = g % 9 3 to g Fig. 4.12 Arithmetic assignment operators.
  19. 19.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 19 4.12 Increment and Decrement Operators • Unary increment operator (++) – Increment variable’s value by 1 • Unary decrement operator (--) – Decrement variable’s value by 1 • C++ is a language “one better than” C • Preincrement / predecrement operator • Postincrement / postdecrement operator
  20. 20.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 20 Operator Called Sample expression Explanation ++ preincrement ++a Increment a by 1, then use the new value of a in the expression in which a resides. ++ postincrement a++ Use the current value of a in the expression in which a resides, then increment a by 1. -- predecrement --b Decrement b by 1, then use the new value of b in the expression in which b resides. -- postdecrement b-- Use the current value of b in the expression in which b resides, then decrement b by 1. Fig. 4.13 The increment and decrement operators.
  21. 21.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 21 Increment.java Line 13 postincrement Line 21 preincrement 1 // Fig. 4.14: Increment.java 2 // Preincrementing and postincrementing operators. 3 4 public class Increment { 5 6 public static void main( String args[] ) 7 { 8 int c; 9 10 // demonstrate postincrement 11 c = 5; // assign 5 to c 12 System.out.println( c ); // print 5 13 System.out.println( c++ ); // print 5 then postincrement 14 System.out.println( c ); // print 6 15 16 System.out.println(); // skip a line 17 18 // demonstrate preincrement 19 c = 5; // assign 5 to c 20 System.out.println( c ); // print 5 21 System.out.println( ++c ); // preincrement then print 6 22 System.out.println( c ); // print 6 23 24 } // end main 25 26 } // end class Increment 5 5 6 5 6 6 Line 13 postincrements c Line 21 preincrements c
  22. 22.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 22 4.13 Primitive Types • Primitive types – “building blocks” for more complicated types • Java is strongly typed – All variables in a Java program must have a type • Java primitive types – portable across computer platforms that support Java
  23. 23.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 23 Type Size in bits Values Standard boolean true or false [Note: The representation of a boolean is specific to the Java Virtual Machine on each computer platform.] char 16 'u0000' to 'uFFFF' (0 to 65535) (ISO Unicode character set) byte 8 –128 to +127 (–27 to 27 – 1) short 16 –32,768 to +32,767 (–215 to 215 – 1) int 32 –2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647 (–231 to 231 – 1) long 64 –9,223,372,036,854,775,808 to +9,223,372,036,854,775,807 (–263 to 263 – 1) float 32 Negative range: –3.4028234663852886E+38 to –1.40129846432481707e–45 Positive range: 1.40129846432481707e–45 to 3.4028234663852886E+38 (IEEE 754 floating point) double 64 Negative range: –1.7976931348623157E+308 to –4.94065645841246544e–324 Positive range: 4.94065645841246544e–324 to 1.7976931348623157E+308 (IEEE 754 floating point) Fig. 4.16The Java primitive types.
  24. 24.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 24 Chapter 5 – Control Structures: Part 2 Outline 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Essentials of Counter-Controlled Repetition 5.3 for Repetition Statement 5.4 Examples Using the for Statement 5.5 do…while Repetition Statement 5.6 switch Multiple-Selection Statement 5.7 break and continue Statements 5.8 Labeled break and continue Statements 5.9 Logical Operators
  25. 25.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 25 5.2 Essentials of Counter-Controlled Repetition • Counter-controlled repetition requires: – Control variable (loop counter) – Initial value of the control variable – Increment/decrement of control variable through each loop – Condition that tests for the final value of the control variable
  26. 26.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 26 WhileCounter.ja va Line 14 Line 16 Line 18 1 // Fig. 5.1: WhileCounter.java 2 // Counter-controlled repetition. 3 import java.awt.Graphics; 4 5 import javax.swing.JApplet; 6 7 public class WhileCounter extends JApplet { 8 9 // draw lines on applet’s background 10 public void paint( Graphics g ) 11 { 12 super.paint( g ); // call paint method inherited from JApplet 13 14 int counter = 1; // initialization 15 16 while ( counter <= 10 ) { // repetition condition 17 g.drawLine( 10, 10, 250, counter * 10 ); 18 ++counter; // increment 19 20 } // end while 21 22 } // end method paint 23 24 } // end class WhileCounter Increment for counter Condition tests for counter’s final value Control-variable name is counter Control-variable initial value is 1
  27. 27.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 27 5.3 for Repetition Statement • Handles counter-controlled-repetition details
  28. 28.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 28 ForCounter.java Line 16 int counter = 1; Line 16 counter <= 10; Line 16 counter++; 1 // Fig. 5.2: ForCounter.java 2 // Counter-controlled repetition with the for statement. 3 import java.awt.Graphics; 4 5 import javax.swing.JApplet; 6 7 public class ForCounter extends JApplet { 8 9 // draw lines on applet’s background 10 public void paint( Graphics g ) 11 { 12 super.paint( g ); // call paint method inherited from JApplet 13 14 // for statement header includes initialization, 15 // repetition condition and increment 16 for ( int counter = 1; counter <= 10; counter++ ) 17 g.drawLine( 10, 10, 250, counter * 10 ); 18 19 } // end method paint 20 21 } // end class ForCounter Condition tests for counter’s final value Control-variable name is counter Control-variable initial value is 1 Increment for counter
  29. 29.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 29 Fig. 5.3 for statement header components. for ( int counter = 1; counter <= 10; counter++ ) Increment of control variable Control variable Final value of control variable for which the condition is true for keyword Loop-continuation condition Initial value of control variable Required semicolon separator Required semicolon separator
  30. 30.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 30 5.3 for Repetition Structure (cont.) for ( initialization; loopContinuationCondition; increment ) statement; can usually be rewritten as: initialization; while ( loopContinuationCondition ) { statement; increment; } init, condition, increment all optional Condition assumed to be true (unending loop) if omitted
  31. 31.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 31 Fig. 5.4 for statement activity diagram. [counter <= 10] [counter > 10] int counter = 1 counter++ Determine whether the final value of control variable has been reached g.drawLine( 10, 10, 250, counter * 10 ); Establish initial value of control variable Draw a line on the applet Increment the control variable
  32. 32.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 32 5.4 Examples Using the for Statement • Varying control variable in for statement – Vary control variable from 1 to 100 in increments of 1 • for ( int i = 1; i <= 100; i++ ) – Vary control variable from 100 to 1 in increments of –1 • for ( int i = 100; i >= 1; i-- ) – Vary control variable from 7 to 77 in increments of 7 • for ( int i = 7; i <= 77; i += 7 )
  33. 33.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 33 Sum.java Line 12 1 // Fig. 5.5: Sum.java 2 // Summing integers with the for statement. 3 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 4 5 public class Sum { 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 int total = 0; // initialize sum 10 11 // total even integers from 2 through 100 12 for ( int number = 2; number <= 100; number += 2 ) 13 total += number; 14 15 // display results 16 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, "The sum is " + total, 17 "Total Even Integers from 2 to 100", 18 JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE ); 19 20 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 21 22 } // end main 23 24 } // end class Sum increment number by 2 each iteration
  34. 34.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 34 Interest.java Lines 13-15 Line 18 Line 19 1 // Fig. 5.6: Interest.java 2 // Calculating compound interest. 3 import java.text.NumberFormat; // class for numeric formatting 4 import java.util.Locale; // class for country-specific information 5 6 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 7 import javax.swing.JTextArea; 8 9 public class Interest { 10 11 public static void main( String args[] ) 12 { 13 double amount; // amount on deposit at end of each year 14 double principal = 1000.0; // initial amount before interest 15 double rate = 0.05; // interest rate 16 17 // create NumberFormat for currency in US dollar format 18 NumberFormat moneyFormat = 19 NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance( Locale.US ); 20 21 // create JTextArea to display output 22 JTextArea outputTextArea = new JTextArea(); 23 24 // set first line of text in outputTextArea 25 outputTextArea.setText( "YeartAmount on depositn" ); 26 Java treats floating-points as type double NumberFormat can format numeric values as currency Display currency values with dollar sign ($)
  35. 35.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 35 Interest.java Lines 28-31 27 // calculate amount on deposit for each of ten years 28 for ( int year = 1; year <= 10; year++ ) { 29 30 // calculate new amount for specified year 31 amount = principal * Math.pow( 1.0 + rate, year ); 32 33 // append one line of text to outputTextArea 34 outputTextArea.append( year + "t" + 35 moneyFormat.format( amount ) + "n" ); 36 37 } // end for 38 39 // display results 40 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, outputTextArea, 41 "Compound Interest", JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE ); 42 43 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate the application 44 45 } // end main 46 47 } // end class Interest Calculate amount with for statement
  36. 36.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 36 5.5 do…while Repetition Statement • do…while structure – Similar to while structure – Tests loop-continuation after performing body of loop • i.e., loop body always executes at least once
  37. 37.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 37 DoWhileTest.jav a Lines 16-20 1 // Fig. 5.7: DoWhileTest.java 2 // Using the do...while statement. 3 import java.awt.Graphics; 4 5 import javax.swing.JApplet; 6 7 public class DoWhileTest extends JApplet { 8 9 // draw lines on applet 10 public void paint( Graphics g ) 11 { 12 super.paint( g ); // call paint method inherited from JApplet 13 14 int counter = 1; // initialize counter 15 16 do { 17 g.drawOval( 110 - counter * 10, 110 - counter * 10, 18 counter * 20, counter * 20 ); 19 ++counter; 20 } while ( counter <= 10 ); // end do...while 21 22 } // end method paint 23 24 } // end class DoWhileTest Oval is drawn before testing counter’s final value
  38. 38.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 38 Fig. 5.8 do…while repetition statement activity diagram. action state [true] [false] condition
  39. 39.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 39 5.6 switch Multiple-Selection Statement • switch statement – Used for multiple selections – case followed by integer or character (case 10 or case ‘y’) – Multiple cases (without code) indicate the same thing done for each case case 3: case 5: case 7: x=y+z; break;
  40. 40.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 40 SwitchTest.java Lines 16-21: Getting user’s input 1 // Fig. 5.9: SwitchTest.java 2 // Drawing lines, rectangles or ovals based on user input. 3 import java.awt.Graphics; 4 5 import javax.swing.*; 6 7 public class SwitchTest extends JApplet { 8 int choice; // user's choice of which shape to draw 9 10 // initialize applet by obtaining user's choice 11 public void init() 12 { 13 String input; // user's input 14 15 // obtain user's choice 16 input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog( 17 "Enter 1 to draw linesn" + 18 "Enter 2 to draw rectanglesn" + 19 "Enter 3 to draw ovalsn" ); 20 21 choice = Integer.parseInt( input ); // convert input to int 22 23 } // end method init 24 25 // draw shapes on applet's background 26 public void paint( Graphics g ) 27 { 28 super.paint( g ); // call paint method inherited from JApplet 29 30 for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) { // loop 10 times (0-9) 31 Get user’s input in JApplet
  41. 41.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 41 SwitchTest.java Line 32: controlling expression Line 32: switch statement Line 48 32 switch ( choice ) { // determine shape to draw 33 34 case 1: // draw a line 35 g.drawLine( 10, 10, 250, 10 + i * 10 ); 36 break; // done processing case 37 38 case 2: // draw a rectangle 39 g.drawRect( 10 + i * 10, 10 + i * 10, 40 50 + i * 10, 50 + i * 10 ); 41 break; // done processing case 42 43 case 3: // draw an oval 44 g.drawOval( 10 + i * 10, 10 + i * 10, 45 50 + i * 10, 50 + i * 10 ); 46 break; // done processing case 47 48 default: // draw string indicating invalid value entered 49 g.drawString( "Invalid value entered", 50 10, 20 + i * 15 ); 51 52 } // end switch 53 54 } // end for 55 56 } // end method paint 57 58 } // end class SwitchTest default case for invalid entries switch statement determines which case label to execute, depending on controlling expression user input (choice) is controlling expression
  42. 42.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 42 SwitchTest.java
  43. 43.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 43 SwitchTest.java
  44. 44.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 44 Fig. 5.10 switch multiple-selection statement activity diagram with break statements. case a action(s) break default action(s) [true] case b action(s) break case z action(s) break . . . [false] case a [true] [true] case b case z [false] [false]
  45. 45.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 45 5.7 break and continue Statements • break/continue – Alter flow of control • break statement – Causes immediate exit from control structure • Used in while, for, do…while or switch statements • Escape early from loop or skip remainder of switch • continue statement – Skips remaining statements in loop body – Proceeds to next iteration • Used in while, for or do…while statements
  46. 46.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 46 BreakTest.java Line 12 Lines 14-15 1 // Fig. 5.11: BreakTest.java 2 // Terminating a loop with break. 3 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 4 5 public class BreakTest { 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 String output = ""; 10 int count; 11 12 for ( count = 1; count <= 10; count++ ) { // loop 10 times 13 14 if ( count == 5 ) // if count is 5, 15 break; // terminate loop 16 17 output += count + " "; 18 19 } // end for 20 21 output += "nBroke out of loop at count = " + count; 22 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, output ); 23 24 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 25 26 } // end main 27 28 } // end class BreakTest Loop 10 times exit for structure (break) when count equals 5
  47. 47.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 47 ContinueTest.ja va Line 11 Lines 13-14 1 // Fig. 5.12: ContinueTest.java 2 // Continuing with the next iteration of a loop. 3 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 4 5 public class ContinueTest { 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 String output = ""; 10 11 for ( int count = 1; count <= 10; count++ ) { // loop 10 times 12 13 if ( count == 5 ) // if count is 5, 14 continue; // skip remaining code in loop 15 16 output += count + " "; 17 18 } // end for 19 20 output += "nUsed continue to skip printing 5"; 21 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, output ); 22 23 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 24 25 } // end main 26 27 } // end class ContinueTest Loop 10 times Skip line 16 and proceed to line 11 when count equals 5
  48. 48.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 48 5.8 Labeled break and continue Statements • Labeled block – Set of statements enclosed by {} – Preceded by a label • Labeled break statement – Exit from nested control structures – Proceeds to end of specified labeled block • Labeled continue statement – Skips remaining statements in nested-loop body – Proceeds to beginning of specified labeled block – Controversial – disguised “goto” statement! – Always a better way than labeled continue
  49. 49.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 49 BreakLabelTest. java Line 11 Line 14 Line 17 Lines 19-20 1 // Fig. 5.13: BreakLabelTest.java 2 // Labeled break statement. 3 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 4 5 public class BreakLabelTest { 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 String output = ""; 10 11 stop: { // labeled block 12 13 // count 10 rows 14 for ( int row = 1; row <= 10; row++ ) { 15 16 // count 5 columns 17 for ( int column = 1; column <= 5 ; column++ ) { 18 19 if ( row == 5 ) // if row is 5, 20 break stop; // jump to end of stop block 21 22 output += "* "; 23 24 } // end inner for 25 26 output += "n"; 27 28 } // end outer for 29 Loop 10 times stop is the labeled block Exit to line 35 (next slide) Nested loop 5 times
  50. 50.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 50 BreakLabelTest. java 30 // following line is skipped 31 output += "nLoops terminated normally"; 32 33 } // end labeled block 34 35 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, output, 36 "Testing break with a label", 37 JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE ); 38 39 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 40 41 } // end main 42 43 } // end class BreakLabelTest
  51. 51.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 51 ContinueLabelTe st.java Line 11 Line 14 Line 17 Lines 21-22 1 // Fig. 5.14: ContinueLabelTest.java 2 // Labeled continue statement. 3 import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 4 5 public class ContinueLabelTest { 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 String output = ""; 10 11 nextRow: // target label of continue statement 12 13 // count 5 rows 14 for ( int row = 1; row <= 5; row++ ) { 15 output += "n"; 16 17 // count 10 columns per row 18 for ( int column = 1; column <= 10; column++ ) { 19 20 // if column greater than row, start next row 21 if ( column > row ) 22 continue nextRow; // next iteration of labeled loop 23 24 output += "* "; 25 26 } // end inner for 27 28 } // end outer for nextRow is the labeled block Loop 5 times Nested loop 10 times continue to line 11 (nextRow)
  52. 52.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 52 ContinueLabelTe st.java 29 30 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, output, 31 "Testing continue with a label", 32 JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE ); 33 34 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 35 36 } // end main 37 38 } // end class ContinueLabelTest
  53. 53.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 53 5.9 Logical Operators • Logical operators – Allows for forming more complex conditions – Combines simple conditions • Java logical operators – && (conditional AND) (short circuit) – & (boolean logical AND) – || (conditional OR) (short circuit) – | (boolean logical OR) – ^ (boolean logical exclusive OR) – ! (logical NOT) (project > 75 && exam>= 80)
  54. 54.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 54 expression1 expression2 expression1 && expression2 false false false false true false true false false true true true Fig. 5.15 && (conditional AND) operator truth table. expression1 expression2 expression1 || expression2 false false false false true true true false true true true true Fig. 5.16 || (conditional OR) operator truth table.
  55. 55.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 55 expression1 expression2 expression1 ^ expression2 false false false false true true true false true true true false Fig. 5.17 ^ (boolean logical exclusive OR) operator truth table. expression !expression false true true false Fig. 5.18 ! (logical negation, or logical NOT) operator truth table.
  56. 56.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 56 LogicalOperator s.java Lines 16-20 Lines 23-27 1 // Fig. 5.19: LogicalOperators.java 2 // Logical operators. 3 import javax.swing.*; 4 5 public class LogicalOperators 6 7 public static void main( String args[] ) 8 { 9 // create JTextArea to display results 10 JTextArea outputArea = new JTextArea( 17, 20 ); 11 12 // attach JTextArea to a JScrollPane so user can scroll results 13 JScrollPane scroller = new JScrollPane( outputArea ); 14 15 // create truth table for && (conditional AND) operator 16 String output = "Logical AND (&&)" + 17 "nfalse && false: " + ( false && false ) + 18 "nfalse && true: " + ( false && true ) + 19 "ntrue && false: " + ( true && false ) + 20 "ntrue && true: " + ( true && true ); 21 22 // create truth table for || (conditional OR) operator 23 output += "nnLogical OR (||)" + 24 "nfalse || false: " + ( false || false ) + 25 "nfalse || true: " + ( false || true ) + 26 "ntrue || false: " + ( true || false ) + 27 "ntrue || true: " + ( true || true ); 28 Conditional AND truth table Conditional OR truth table
  57. 57.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 57 LogicalOperator s.java Lines 30-34 Lines 37-41 Lines 44-48 Lines 51-53 29 // create truth table for & (boolean logical AND) operator 30 output += "nnBoolean logical AND (&)" + 31 "nfalse & false: " + ( false & false ) + 32 "nfalse & true: " + ( false & true ) + 33 "ntrue & false: " + ( true & false ) + 34 "ntrue & true: " + ( true & true ); 35 36 // create truth table for | (boolean logical inclusive OR) operator 37 output += "nnBoolean logical inclusive OR (|)" + 38 "nfalse | false: " + ( false | false ) + 39 "nfalse | true: " + ( false | true ) + 40 "ntrue | false: " + ( true | false ) + 41 "ntrue | true: " + ( true | true ); 42 43 // create truth table for ^ (boolean logical exclusive OR) operator 44 output += "nnBoolean logical exclusive OR (^)" + 45 "nfalse ^ false: " + ( false ^ false ) + 46 "nfalse ^ true: " + ( false ^ true ) + 47 "ntrue ^ false: " + ( true ^ false ) + 48 "ntrue ^ true: " + ( true ^ true ); 49 50 // create truth table for ! (logical negation) operator 51 output += "nnLogical NOT (!)" + 52 "n!false: " + ( !false ) + 53 "n!true: " + ( !true ); 54 55 outputArea.setText( output ); // place results in JTextArea 56 Logical NOT truth table Boolean logical exclusive OR truth table Boolean logical inclusive OR truth table Boolean logical AND truth table
  58. 58.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Outline 58 LogicalOperator s.java 57 JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, scroller, 58 "Truth Tables", JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE ); 59 60 System.exit( 0 ); // terminate application 61 62 } // end main 63 64 } // end class LogicalOperators

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