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Diagrams for My Data, My Value: 6 Sense Making Diagrams from the Personal Data Ecosystem

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These are the Sense making diagrams on two pages that are 11x17 for the My Data My Value 6 Sense Making Diagrams from the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium presented at the 2016 Cloud Identity Summit. It was in the Rise of the Identity-enabled Personal Information Economy Track. It puts forward 6 Diagrams to make Sense of the overall Personal Data Ecosystem including What is Personal Data? What Happens to Personal Data? What are Market Models and how is it regulated?

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Diagrams for My Data, My Value: 6 Sense Making Diagrams from the Personal Data Ecosystem

  1. 1. The Value Network Map below shows the value flows (in a simplified form) in the current ecosystem around targeted advertising and data aggregation*. The Individual is at the center and a next ring of parties has direct engagement with the individual (Publisher, Attribute Verifier, Data Collector, Network Address Provider, Payment Processors) while a wider ring does not (Marketers, Data Analytics Providers, Data Set Brokers). Read the narrative and see the matching colored section of the map. There is numbered value flow for each color that that goes with the narrative. The individual puts their attention towards a publisher’s website by clicking to view content, in doing so data about the view and information about the ad inventory available in that viewing act is available to a marketer who places a message (ad) on the page which is viewed by the individual. Persuaded by the ad the individual goes to a retail store advertised, in doing so they become subject to the terms of use put forward by the site and the data from the click is sent off to an aggregate data set broker. Using the data they data broker shares with the retailer a profile of the user and it uses this information to adapt the offer it makes to the user. The individual likes the offer and places an order. It is an item that requires a proof of an attribute - say a student in a school or being over the age of 19. The individual must go to an attribute verifier to get proof the attribute (and they are also given explicit or implicit use rights). They then share this proof of attribute to the retailer. Alternatively the user might choose to ask the Attribute verifier tell the Retailer directly about their status. Alternatively without the users involvement the retailer could ask for attribute from the provider without the individual’s consent or awareness. The retailer also requires a valid network end-point a phone number or e-mail address that works to contact the individual. So they request this from the Individual and send a message to the address and ask for confirmation. Now the retailer is ready to charge the individual using a payment processor and once the transaction goes through the individual gets the good they ordered. The data trails from the transaction continue....the retailer has a data set of transactions and it sells it to a data broker. The payment processor also has data and it too sells it to the data broker. Note that the Data Broker has no direct relationship to the Individual who’s specific data is contained within the data set and shared with the broker. The Retailer wants an analysis of his data and goes to a company that can provide that specific service. The data analytics company uses data from the data broker to help in its analysis. The Marketer who is trying to find more information about who to target taps the services of the data broker and aggregator.
 The whole map goes full circle when this data is used to shape the ads the individual sees when he goes to the publishers' website. DATA USES: Personal Data Ecosystem Public examples: UTILITY COMPANIES MEDIA GOVERNMENT AGENCIES examples: Medical PHARMACIESHOSPITALS DOCTORS & NURSES examples: Retail RETAIL STORES AIRLINES CREDIT CARD COMPANIES examples: SOCIAL NETWORKING SERVICES RETAIL & CONTENT WEBSITES BUY ONE, GET ONE! SPECIAL OFFER! Internet examples: Financial & Insurace STOCK COMPANIES INSURANCE BANKS Information Brokers Websites Catalog Co-ops Media Archives List Brokers Affiliates DATA COLLECTORS (sources) Media Marketers Employers Banks Product & Service Delivery Government Lawyers/ Private Investigators Individuals Law Enforcement DATA BROKERS DATA USERS Credit Bureaus Healthcare Analytics Ad Networks & Analytics Companies Examples of uses of consumer information in personally identifiable or aggregated form: Financial services, such as for banking or investment accounts Credit granting, such as for credit or debit cards; mortgage, automobile or specialty loans; automobile rentals; or telephone services Insurance granting, such as for health, automobile or life Retail coupons and special offers Catalog and magazine solicitations Web and mobile services, including content, e-mail, search, and social networking Product and service delivery, such as streaming video, package delivery, or a cable signal Attorneys, such as for case investigations Individual examples: Telecommunications & Mobile CARRIERSMOBILE PROVIDERS CABLE COMPANIES Journalism, such as for fact checking Marketing, whether electronically, through direct mail, or by telephone Data brokers for aggregation and resale to companies and/or consumers Background investigations by employers or landlords Locating missing or lost persons, beneficiaries, or witnesses Law enforcement Research (e.g., health, financial, and online search data) by academic institutions, government agencies, and commercial companies Fraud detection and prevention Government benefits and services, such as licensing Public examples: UTILITY COMPANIES MEDIA GOVERNMENT AGENCIES examples: Medical PHARMACIESHOSPITALS DOCTORS & NURSES examples: Retail RETAIL STORES AIRLINES CREDIT CARD COMPANIES examples: SOCIAL NETWORKING SERVICES SEARCH ENGINES RETAIL & CONTENT WEBSITES BUY ONE, GET ONE! SPECIAL OFFER! Internet examples: Financial & Insurace STOCK COMPANIES INSURANCE BANKS Information Brokers Websites Catalog Co-ops Media Archives List Brokers Affiliates Media Marketers Employers Banks Product & Service Delivery Government Lawyers/ Private Investigators Individuals Law Enforcement Credit Bureaus Healthcare Analytics Ad Networks & Analytics Companies examples: Telecommunications & Mobile ISPsMOBILE PROVIDERS CABLE COMPANIES examples: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_events/exploring-privacy-roundtable-series/personaldataecosystem.pdf
  2. 2. Individual: A person Devices: Mobile phones, computers, self tracking devices, medical monitoring devices, e-readers. Context: Where a person is (home, school, work). The Role they are playing (parent, coach, spouse, employee, supervisor, athletic team member). Persona they are presenting (video game player, professional, goofy hobby identity). Data: The bits generated explicitly such as photos, tweets, status updates. Frameworks: Contractual mutli-party frameworks connect legal/policy agreements to technical interoperability to protect the individual and enable markets. The Personal Cloud service provider is at the heart of these frameworks, chosen by the end user, and works on their behalf managing their data and its participation in the framework. Personal Data Analytics: Services that help people gain insight into their own personal data. An example being one’s daily health status or a personal annual report. [Trusted Organizations] Product Producer: This is an example of a Vendor Relationship Management connection where a consumer who bought a product from a producer manages an open channel with the maker of the product they bought and willingly share information under favorable terms they the user set. Infomediary: A service trusted to have insight into a person’s data and working on their behalf. They have an individual’s personally identifiable information (PII) and protect that data and put it to use. Data Aggregation Services: Services create aggregate data sets from personal data, like music listening habits. Aggregators may compensate people for their data, people may share altruistically, or people may unknowingly share. Public Services: Governments delivering services to their constituents can enable use of personal data stores for better access and data quality. [The Market] Market Place: This is where an Individual’s business agents with PII meet Vendor agents without PII. Retailers: Companies that sell goods to customers. Service Providers: Companies that provide services to people. Vendor Agents: Companies that help retailers and service providers find good potential leads. They do not have personally identifiable information. [Governance] How systems are regulated take many forms. Governance starts with laws and regulation but also includes cultural practices, business norms, and, in digital systems, how identifiers are allocated and the code that connects them. LEGAL: Government: plays many roles in the systems: Regulator: Governments set baseline rules for how markets work. They provide the court system where contract law is adjudicated. Public Records: Governments record births, marriages, divorces, deaths along with licensing, and property title registries. Public Safety: Policing and law enforcement. Ombudsman: Many states have a data protection commissioner who protects constituents. International Treaty Organizations: They support the coordination of international treaties and provide a meta-international law that hold governments accountable to each other. CODE: Computer code and how it runs determines what is possible in computer systems. The phrase “Code is Law” was popularized by Lawrence Lessig. Standards Development Organizations: Bruce Sterling said “If code is law then standards are like the Senate.” Standards bodies agree on how code works regardless of the particular language it is written in or system it is running on. For example, the W3C standardizes the HTML specification for presenting web pages. IDENTIFIER: Networks run on identifiers for each endpoint. How these are allocated, and the terms and conditions of use in a network, govern the network. Global Identifier Registries: Examples include the phone system, Domain Names, ISBN numbers, RFID. Private Name Spaces: examples include Twitter, Skype, Google, Facebook etc. PEER: This kind of governance is the most powerful in many ways and helps social systems operate. Peer-to-Peer: People have opinions about each other and also about businesses and services they interact with - like Yelp for small businesses. Professional: Doctors, lawyers, engineers, geologists, and architects are professions that peer regulate. Institutional: Institutions figure out what other peer institutions are - such as banks worldwide in SWIFT. Framework Creators: Organizations that create contractual legal-policy/technology frameworks that govern complex multi-party networks. My Data, My Value, 6 Sense Making Diagrams presented by Kaliya Young, Founder of PDEC at the Cloud Identity Summit. We invite you to become a member of PDEC to participate in shaping and influencing the emerging personal data ecosystem. To learn more about the range of PDEC memberships please visit: http://www.pde.cc/membership Feel free to arrange a call with Dean Landsman, PDEC Executive Director. dean@pde.cc

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