The Changing Cohort of Medical Students - Birmingham MedSoc Conference

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'The Changing Cohort of Medical Students'
Dr Fiona Pathiraja Dr Marie‐Claire Wilson

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The Changing Cohort of Medical Students - Birmingham MedSoc Conference

  1. 1. The  changing  cohort  of     medical  students   Dr  Fiona  Pathiraja   Dr  Marie-­‐Claire  Wilson   November  2011  
  2. 2. Objec=ves  •  Address  the  ques=on   “Where  will  your  Medsoc   be  in  2020?”  with  specific   relevance  to  the  changing   nature  of  medical  school   cohorts  •  Changing  make-­‐up,   behaviours  and  aMtudes   of  future  medical  students   and  how  this  will  relate  to   future  MedSocs    
  3. 3. About  us    •  Conquest  Medschools  •  Founded  by  Dr  Marie-­‐Claire  Wilson  and                   Dr  Fiona  Pathiraja  in  2009  •  Educa=onal  consultancy  with  a  strong   widening  access  focus    •  Workshops,  summer  schools,  conferences  to   raise  the  issue  of  widening  access  to  the   medical  profession  
  4. 4. The  medical  student  through  the  ages  •  Medicine  wasn’t  always  a   respected  profession  •  There  has  been  a  rise  in  pres=ge   aSached  to  being  a  medical   student    •  Several  privileges  aSached  to   the  role  •  Over  the  past  20  years,   admission  to  medical  school  has   become  increasingly  difficult  
  5. 5. Medical  student  archetypes  •  Medical  student  communi=es  have  previously  been   quite  homogenous  •  Only  a  specific  type  of  person,  from  a  specific  type  of   school,  with  specific  types  of  parents  would  have   thought  about  applying  to  medicine  
  6. 6. An  archetypal  doctor  
  7. 7. What  is  widening  access?  •  Widening  access  to  the   medical  profession  is  about   encouraging  talented  young   people  from  non-­‐tradi=onal   backgrounds  to  think  about   applying  to  medical  school  •  Their  parents  may  not  have   been  to  university  and  may   work  in  low-­‐paid  jobs  •  They  might  go  to  schools   where  no-­‐one  has  ever   applied  to  medicine  before    
  8. 8. The  horizon  of  widening  access  also  includes…  •  Female  medical   students  •  Disabled  students  •  Graduate   students  •  LGBT  students  
  9. 9. Why  is  this  important?     •  Our  pa=ent   popula=ons  are   diverse  in  age,   culture,   •  A  diverse  range   of  doctors  with   different   backgrounds  is   beSer  suited  to   serve  this  pa=ent   popula=on  
  10. 10. Any  other  thoughts?   It’s  not  fair  that  bright  people  from  non-­‐tradi=onal   We  need  all  the  healthcare   backgrounds  should  be   workers  we  can  get  –  there   denied  a  chance  to  study   shouldn’t  be  discrimina=on   medicine   based  on  background/ gender/sexuality,  etc.     Why  should  we  care  about   whether  disadvantaged   people  get  into  medical  school   or  not?  
  11. 11. On  the  poli=cal  agenda…  •  A  pre-­‐condi=on  of  the  establishment  of  new   medical  schools  was  to  have  ac=ve  widening   par=cipa=on  programmes  •  In  Oct  2003  John  HuSon  announced  that  £3m   was  available  to  fund  pilot  projects  to  aSract  a   wider  range  of  people  into  the  healthcare   professions  •  HEFCE  allocated  a  further  £6m  to  widen   par=cipa=on  .  Many  of  the  pilot  projects  were   however  delayed    
  12. 12. BMA  survey  findings  The  BMA  report  in  their  Survey  of  Medical  Student  Finance  2008/09  that:    •  Only  15%  of  respondents   were  from  skilled  trades,   semi-­‐skilled  and  unskilled   occupa=onal  backgrounds  •  Only  5%  came  from  semi-­‐ skilled  and  unskilled   occupa=onal  backgrounds  •  LiSle  change  from  1999  
  13. 13. BMA  survey  findings  Barriers:  •  Finance,  funding  support   and  debt  •  Interview  and   communica=on  techniques  •  Lack  of  informa=on  •  Entry  tests/UKCAT  •  Paths  into  the  professions   including  flexible  entry  •  Work  experience  
  14. 14. The  medical  student  cohort  in  2020   Won’t  be  much   different  to   Will  be  more   now  reflec=ve  of  our   society   Only  the  rich   Students  will  be   will  be  able   consumers/   to  afford  uni   customers  
  15. 15. What  does  this  mean  for  MedSocs?  •  What  will  your  medical   school  be  like  in  2020?  •  Who  will  be  on  your   MedSoc?  •  Should  MedSocs  be   involved  in  widening   access?   –  If  so,  how?  
  16. 16. MedSocs  levelling  the  playing  field  •  MedSocs  could  help  students   from  non-­‐tradi=onal   backgrounds  through:   –  Knowing  the  local  schools     –  Work  experience  schemes   –  Mentoring  across  the   applica=on  process  from   UKCAT/BMAT  to  interviews   –  Providing  informa=on  and   advice  and  being  accessible  
  17. 17. Rough  cost  calcula=on  of  aSending   medical  school     •  University fees at £9,000 over 5 years = £45,000 •  Living costs at £6,120 over 6 years = £36,720 •  Books/learning aids at £200 over 6 years = £1,200 •  Additional costs e.g. Professional Studies Loan/overdraft = £10,000 TOTAL POTENTIAL COST at medical school = £92,920
  18. 18. Rough  calcula=on  of  postgraduate  costs  to  become  a  hospital  doctor   •  GMC license to practice £1,780 •  Postgraduate exams £1,456 •  Courses for exams £1,500 •  Books and subscriptions £1,000 •  Courses and conferences over 9 years £10,000 •  Travel to place of work over 9 years £9,000 Basic total: £24,736
  19. 19. Es=mated  personal  cost  of  a  UK   medical  educa=on     £117,656  
  20. 20. Cost  to  the  taxpayer  of  training  a  UK   medical  student   £250,000  
  21. 21. MedSocs  are  now  represen=ng   medical  student  consumers    •  If  HE  becomes  increasingly   expensive,  it  is  possible  that  students   will  be  more  like  consumers  and   demand  more  of  their  universi=es  •  Consumers  want  more  for  their   money  and  are  not  afraid  to   complain,  cri=que  and  lobby  to  get   the  most  for  their  investment  •  Shaping  the  face  of  medicine  should   now  be  a  much  easier  thing  to  do    
  22. 22. What  is  the  medsoc’s  posi=on  in   2020?  •  Students  are  now  investors  and   have  a  stronger  stake  in  their   future  •  BeSer  posi=oned  to  change  the   face  of  medicine  •  The  student  body  and  the  med   socs  who  represent  them  are  in  a   powerful  posi=on  to  nego=ate   change  •  Think  about  widening  access  and   the  sort  of  med  student   community  you  want  to  be  a  part   of  
  23. 23. Make  it  happen  
  24. 24. Contact  details  •  Email:  info@conquestmedschools.com  •  TwiSer:     –  Conquest  Medschools  @conquestmedsch   –  Fiona  Pathiraja  @dr_fiona   –  Marie-­‐Claire  Wilson  @MCW_London  •  Facebook:   –  Conquest  Medschools  fan  page  

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