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Putting the Capital 'A' in CoCoRAHS: An Experimental Program to Measure Albedo

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Oral presentation given by Elizabeth Burakowski at the 2012 Eastern Snow Conference in Claryville, NY 5-7 June 2012. Awarded the Wiesnet Medal for Best Student Paper.

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Putting the Capital 'A' in CoCoRAHS: An Experimental Program to Measure Albedo

  1. 1. Putting the Capital ‘A’ in CoCoRaHS: An Experimental Program to Measure Albedo Using theCommunity Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network Photo: Midge Eliassen Photo: Michelle Day Photo: Midge EliassenElizabeth BurakowskiJack DibbMary StamponeCameron Wake
  2. 2. Putting the Capital ‘A’ in CoCoRAHS: An Experimental Program to Measure Albedo Using theCommunity Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network ^ Albedo Photo: Midge Eliassen Photo: Michelle Day Photo: Midge EliassenElizabeth BurakowskiJack DibbMary StamponeCameron Wake
  3. 3. Outline• Motivation• Research Objectives• The CoCoRAHS Albedo Network• Results• Future Work• Acknowledgements 3
  4. 4. Motivation Me Twin sisterLife-long obsession with albedo that began in 1986 4
  5. 5. Motivation • State-wide effort to measure the impact of land use, population growth, and climate on New Hampshire’s ecosystems • Link between land cover and climate: – Climate impacts of historical deforestation 5Foster et al., 2010. Wildlands and Woodlands
  6. 6. Motivation• State-wide effort to measure the impact of land use, population growth, and climate on New Hampshire’s ecosystems• Link between land cover and climate: – Climate impacts of historical deforestation – Greater sensitivity in shortwave energy balance through changes in winter albedo (Robinson &Kukla, 1985) 6 Betts and Ball 1997
  7. 7. Motivation• State-wide effort to measure the impact of land use, population growth, and climate on New Hampshire’s ecosystems• Link between land cover and climate: – Deforestation  greater sensitivity in shortwave energy balance through changes in winter albedo (Robinson &Kukla, 1985) 7
  8. 8. Motivation• State-wide effort to measure the impact of land use, population growth, and climate on New Hampshire’s ecosystems• Link between land cover and climate: – Deforestation  greater sensitivity in shortwave energy balance through changes in winter albedo (Robinson &Kukla, 1985)• Embrace CoCoRaHS mission to: 1. Use low-cost measurement tools 2. Provide training and education 3. Collect, record, and communicate albedo data for educational and research applications 8
  9. 9. Research Objectives• Establish a volunteer network of citizen scientists to collect daily measurements of: 1. surface albedo 2. snow depth 3. snow density• Measure surface albedo for a variety of land cover types 9
  10. 10. CoCoRaHS Albedo Network• 18 CoCoRAHS observers• 15 observers able to report regularly (4-7 times/week) • 12 grass lawn • 1 bare soil • 1 rooftop deck • 1 pasture• Mostly retired individuals• Actively seeking school groups for 2012/2013 10
  11. 11. Thompson Farm Research Station Durham, NH 11
  12. 12. Thompson Farm Research Station Durham, NH• Daily CoCoRAHS Measurements• Comparison of Kipp and Zonen CMA6 30- min average albedo vs 12
  13. 13. CoCoRaHS Albedo Network CoCoRAHS Albedo Kit• Apogee MP-200 Pyranometer with custom leveling boom• 2-ft and 4-ft aluminum snow tubes• Hanging digital scale• Spatula• Yardstick• Field Notebook 13
  14. 14. CoCoRaHS Albedo Network FieldSpec4 Spectroradiometer• Measure snow-covered and snow-free spectral albedo at CoCoRAHS and UNH Thompson Farm sites• Opportunity to test out instrument before purchasing 14
  15. 15. Results: Albedo 15
  16. 16. Results: Albedo & Snow Depth 16
  17. 17. Results: Albedo & Snow Density R=0.41 17
  18. 18. Results: Spectral Albedo
  19. 19. Conclusions• Apogee MP-200 low-cost albedometer comparable to Kipp and Zonen CMA6• Albedo increases logarithmically with snow depth• Albedo decreases linearly with snow density, likely due to increases in grain size• CoCoRAHS Albedo shows great promise to provide useful albedo and snow data for research and education applications Photo: Midge Eliassen Photo: Midge Eliassen 19
  20. 20. Future Work• Evaluate climate impacts of snow cover on forested and non-forested landscapes• Compare snow density collected with snow pillow, snow tube and scale, snow tube and melt methods (UNH Undergrad Ethan Chase)• Climate and Land Surface Modeling - Weather, Research, and Forecasting (WRF) Model - Community Land Model (CLM4.0)• Snow grain size data collection• Equip observers with IR temperature guns for skin surface temperature measurements• Snow dance for 2012/2013 field season! 20
  21. 21. Acknowledgements Website:www.cocorahs-albedo.org• National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (NSF-EPSCoR #1101-245)• NASA New Hampshire Space Grant Fellowship• ASD, Inc. Goetz Instrument Support Program• CoCoRAHS Volunteers• David Harrigan, Jake Logemann, Mike Routhier• Advising Committee - Dr. Cameron Wake (UNH) - Dr. Jack Dibb (UNH) - Dr. Mary Stampone (NH State Climatologist) - Dr. Scott Ollinger (UNH) - Dr. Ming Chen (NCAR, Boulder)• Family and Friends 21
  22. 22. Canopy & Pasture Temperature 22
  23. 23. Thompson Farm: Canopy and Pasture• Canopy albedo does not change very much compared to pasture albedo.• Snow cover persists longer under canopy than in the pasture (when it’s not +80oF)• Snow density generally increases over time. 23

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