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Being Comfortable With The Uncomfortable

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Being Comfortable With The Uncomfortable

  1. 1. Being Comfortable with the Uncomfortable Intercultural Dialogue
  2. 2. What is Culture? Objective #2: Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals (Haug, 2014)
  3. 3. "I Got Hot Sauce In My Bag" Objective #1: Gained cultural self-awareness
  4. 4. "I Got Hot Sauce In My Bag" Does this item represent you culturally in any way? If so, how? How does this item represent the culture/environment you live in? How can this item be beneficial to someone else?
  5. 5. Pre-Assessment Objective #1: Gained cultural self-awareness Objective #2: Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals Objective #4: Utilized the skills of cultural lifelong learning to improve daily interactions in student affairs through assessment
  6. 6. What do you believe intercultural dialogue is? Conversations about perspective, attitudes, and beliefs, and beliefs by people from a variety of cultural backgrounds and differences. - Kelsey Bowling
  7. 7. What do you believe intercultural dialogue is? Different groups of people sharing diverse points of view and making the effort the effort to learn about and work with one another efficiently. -Danielle Graham
  8. 8. What do you believe intercultural dialogue is? Learning to communicate with people from other cultures and backgrounds. -Katie Mcgrath
  9. 9. What Will You Learn? At the end of this workshop, participants will have... 1. Gained cultural self-awareness 2. Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals 3. Differentiated Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions after applying to various cultural examples 4. Utilized the skills of being a cultural lifelong learner to improve daily interactions in student affairs through self-assessment 5. Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations
  10. 10. Why is it important in Student Affairs? Objective #2: Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals 1. Developing Competence 3. Moving through Autonomy to Interdependence 4. Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships 5. Establishing Identity 7. Developing Integrity (Evans, Forney, Guido, Patton, & Renn, 2010)
  11. 11. King and Magolda (2005) Development of Intercultural Maturity Model ATTRIBUTE  Understanding  Sensitivity to others  Sense of oneself that enabl one to listen to and learn from others DIMENSION  Cognitive  Interpersonal  Intrapersonal (Evans, Forney, Guido, Patton, & Renn, 2010)
  12. 12. What is Your Comfort Zone? Share what makes you comfortable in a conversation.
  13. 13. Safe Space Brave Space (Arao and Clemens 2013)
  14. 14. How People From Different Cultures Approach The Table 1. Establishing contact 2. Relationship building 3. Team building activities 4. Expression of emotion 5. Level of disclosure 6. Variation in time 7. Hierarchical vs. Horizontal 8. Impact of power (International Extension Curriculum, n.d.)
  15. 15. Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions
  16. 16. Hofstede's Culture Dimensions  Geert Hofstede (1928 - )  Dutch Social Psychologist , IBM  Conducted one of the most comprehensive studies of how values in the workplace are influenced by culture (National Culture, n.d.)
  17. 17. Hofstede's Cultural Dimension's National scores range from 0 (lowest) to 100 (highest) A score of 50 is considered midlevel but rankings are relative Because culture is so complex and dynamic, problems of reliability and validity make it very difficult to measure. Two people from the same culture will have disagreements on how to accurately and articulately describe their own culture Culture is not personality (National Culture, n.d.)
  18. 18. Hierarchy High Power Distance  A cultural dimension where a group of people accept an unequal distribution of power  A person from a large power distance culture will misperceive low power distance as disrespectful, improper or rude  Examples: Malaysia (104), Guatemala (95), Panama (95) Low Power Distance  A cultural dimension where a group of people accept an equal distribution of power  A person from a low power distance culture will misperceive a high power distance as bossy/rigid or servile/cowardly  Examples: Austria (11), Israel (13), Denmark (18) United States = 40 Low Power Distance (Murniadi, 2014)
  19. 19. Gender Masculine  Gender specific roles are valued and clearly distinct  Achievement, ambition, acquisition of material goods are valued  An emphasis on fighting and achievement  A person who is culturally more masculine may perceive a person who is culturally more feminine as weak for men and masculine for women Feminine  Gender specific roles are not valued  Service to others, support for the unfortunate, and nurturance are valued  A person who is culturally more feminine may misperceive a person who is culturally more masculine as aggressive for men and "baby doll" for women United States = 62 Masculine (Murniadi, 2014)
  20. 20. Identity Individualism  The tendency to emphasize individual identities, beliefs, needs, goals, and views rather than those of the group  As countries have become richer, they move toward the individualist end of the spectrum (wealth makes it easier to take care of themselves)  An individualist will misperceive a collectivist as dishonest, corrupt  Examples: Australia (90), UK (89) Collectivism  The tendency to focus on the goals, needs, and views of the in-group rather than individuals' own goals, needs, and views  Collectivism can be seen as adaptation to poverty and limited resources  A collectivist will misperceive an individualist as insulting, dishonest, and rude  Examples: Guatemala (6), Ecuador (8) United States = 91 Individualistic (Murniadi, 2014)
  21. 21. Truth Low Uncertainty Avoidance  A culture in which people enjoy being in ambiguous situations  Countries with weak uncertainty avoidance believe in many truths and are more tolerant with practices that deviate from traditions  A person from a weak uncertainty avoidance culture will misperceive a strong uncertainty avoidance person as rigid and paranoid  Examples: Singapore (8), Jamaica (13), Denmark (23) High Uncertainty Avoidance  A culture in which people are threatened by ambiguous situations  Countries with strong uncertainty avoidance tend to be more dogmatic and are not friendly toward outsiders  A person from a strong uncertainty avoidance cultural will misperceive a weak uncertainty avoidance person as unprincipled and immoral  Examples: Greece (100), Portugal (99) United States =46 Low Uncertainty Avoidance (Murniadi, 2014)
  22. 22. Virtue Short Term Orientation  Values quick results  Concerned with short term enjoyment  A person who is short term oriented will misperceive a person who is long term oriented as cold and stingy  Examples: West African countries Long Term Orientation  A cultural dimension that values perseverance and tenacity  Concerned with long term prosperity  A person who is long term oriented will misperceive a person who is short term oriented as irresponsible and careless with money  Examples: Japan (88), China (87) United States = 26 Short Term Orientation (Murniadi, 2014)
  23. 23. Hofstede Resource http://geert-hofstede.com/
  24. 24. Bundt Cake Objective #3: Differentiated Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions after applying to various cultural examples (Kakaweb, 2008)
  25. 25. Break Workshop will resume at 6:10 PM
  26. 26. Importance of Communication  Nonverbal communication is "silent" communication and includes the use of gestures, postures, position, eye contact, facial expressions and conversational distance. Objective #2: Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals Words 7% Tone, Volume, Inflection, and Intonation… Nonverbal 55% Nonverbal 55% There are three kinds of nonverbal communication in a multicultural context: 1. Nonverbal behaviors that exist in all cultures, but which are assigned different meanings in various cultures. 2. Nonverbal behaviors that exist in some cultures, but which are assigned different meanings within respective cultures. 3. Nonverbal behaviors that have meaning in one culture but no meaning at all in other cultures. Tolerance.org
  27. 27. Objective #5: Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations
  28. 28. Objective #5: Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations Activity
  29. 29. Team Building Activity Objective #5: Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations What difficulties, if any, did your team face when planning this event? Being many of the assigned behaviors were culturally oriented, how could you have seen to it that individual needs were met and that all contributions were respected and accepted in a positive way? How could you apply what was learned from this activity to your work as student affairs professionals?
  30. 30. UNESCO The world is more and more interconnected but it does not mean that individuals and societies really live together – as reveal the exclusions suffered by millions of poor, women, youth, migrants and disenfranchised minorities. Today there is more information, technology and knowledge available than ever before, but adequate wisdom is still needed to prevent conflicts, to eradicate poverty or to make it possible for all to learn in order to live in harmony in a safe world. http://en.unesco.org/themes/intercultural-dialogue
  31. 31. In social justice and diversity education, do we focus on what we have in common or what differs? “I have found the most effective strategy is not to focus on one at the exclusion of the other. Instead of creating an ‘either/or’ dichotomy, we must advance to a ‘both/and’ approach. As long as you only acknowledge only one of these approaches, you will never be successful in building the bridge essential to connecting the gap between the have and the have nots” (123-124, Cullen).
  32. 32. We're all in this together. When you leave what is comfortable and familiar in order to take on something new and exciting, it is natural to feel unsettled and even afraid. This is where the support of your colleagues is most important. Dreyer, J. S. (2015)
  33. 33. The Door To Ubuntu Is gratitude, and it is always open. Nelson and Lundin, 2010. The path to Ubuntu is marked by humanity; we follow the path from person to person. The spirit of Ubuntu is found through community. Community is created when you find unity of purpose with others.
  34. 34. Ubuntu Starts with recognizing and embracing the humanity, the equality, and the value of each person. Nelson and Lundin, 2010.
  35. 35. (Stone and Church, 1973, p.499) "[T]he adult with a capacity for true maturity is one who has grown out of childhood without losing childhood‘s best traits. [They have] incorporated these into a new pattern of simplicity dominated by adult stability, wisdom, knowledge, sensitivity to other people, responsibility, strength and purposiveness” [They have] retained the basic emotional strengths of infancy, the stubborn autonomy of toddlerhood, the capacity for wonder and pleasure and playfulness of the pre-school years, and the idealism and passion of adolescence.
  36. 36. Life-Long Culture Learning  Needs to be learned more consciously  Is not separate from learning one’s own (home) culture Culture shapes the way we see the world. It therefore has the capacity to bring about the change of attitudes needed to ensure peace and sustainable development, which, we know, form the only possible way forward for life on Planet Earth. (...) When we speak about culture, we are looking at ways of living as individuals and ways of living together. A ‘living culture’ is one which—almost by definition—interacts with others, in that it involves people creating, blending, borrowing and reinventing meanings with which they can identify. - Frederico Mayor, Preface, World Culture Report 1998, UNESCO
  37. 37. Life Long Learning Medel-Anonuevo, 2001, pg. 12 Research shows that if you were an active learner when you were young, you will stay that way when you are older.  Learning provides opportunities to develop:  The capacity to integrate new experiences  And adapt to new situations  We seek to learn because it enables us to:  Change  Sustain or improve skills, knowledge, and attitudes
  38. 38. Life Long Learning is Change Medel-Anonuevo, 2001, pg. 12  Self- growth  Self-actualization  The development of self-efficacy  Skill development  Knowledge acquisition  Creativity development
  39. 39. HOW CAN YOU LEARN FOR A LIFETIME? Options  Watch a movie about another culture.  Have a conversation with someone from another culture.  Make a friend from another culture. We all learn differently, therefore you can seek your own ways of learning about another culture.
  40. 40. Snowball Activity Objective #4: Utilized the skills of cultural lifelong learning to improve daily interactions in student affairs through assessment
  41. 41. SNOWBALL ACTIVITY QUESTIONS 1. How can you become a better intercultural team member? 2. How can you build an intercultural community? 3. How can you incorporate culture & communication in your daily life as a Student Affairs professional?
  42. 42. Objective #1: Gained cultural self-awareness Objective #2: Articulated why intercultural dialogue is essential as Student Affairs Professionals Objective #3: Differentiated Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions after applying to various cultural examples Objective #4: Utilized the skills of cultural lifelong learning to improve daily interactions in student affairs through assessment Objective #5: Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations Are You Comfortable With The Uncom
  43. 43. Objective #5: Prepared to embrace cultural ambiguity and become a contributing team member in uncomfortable situations
  44. 44. May each of you discover the success and happiness that comes from embracing the humanity of all whom you encounter. Nelson and Lundin, 2010
  45. 45. References [30 Rockers]. (2014, February 8).Parks & Rec ice rink campaign [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nojC6fP56VI Arao, B., & Clemens, K. (2013). From safe spaces to brave spaces: A new way to frame dialogue around diversity and social justice. In L. Landreman (Ed.), The art of effective facilitation: Reflections from social justice educators (pp. 135-150). Sterling, VA: Stylus. Cullen, M.J. (2008). 35 dumb things well-intentioned people say: Surprising things we say that widen the diversity gap. Garden City, NY; Experts Academy Press. Dreyer, J. S. (2015). Ubuntu. International Journal Of Practical Theology, 19(1), 189-209. doi:10.1515/ijpt-2015-002 Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F. M., Patton, L. D., & Renn, K. A. (2010). Student development in college theory, research, and practice (2nd Edition ed.). San Francisco, California, United States of America: Jossey-Bass. Fried, J. (2012). Transformative learning through engagement: Student affairs practice as experiential pedagogy. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. Haug, E. [Eva Haug]. (2014, March 29). What is culture? [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Me2HlTQPS40 I got hot sauce in my bag #formation [Vine post].Retrieved from https://vine.co/v/i1AbY0LL0OD Intercultural Dialogue. (2013). Retrieved March 13, 2016, from http://en.unesco.org/themes/intercultural-dialogue International Extension Curriculum. (n.d.). Building intercultural team relationships. Retrieved from https://ag.purdue.edu/ipia/iec/Shared%20Documents/Module%201/1.6.S6.pdf
  46. 46. [Kakaweb]. (2008, October 21). Potatoes – My Big Fat Greek Wedding [ Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQC6cLJhTek King, P. M., & Magolda, M. B. (2005). A developmental model of intercultural maturity. Journal Of College Student Development, 46(6), 571-592. doi:10.1353/csd.2005.0060 London, Y. [Youmanity London] (2014, June 13). UNESCO peace & intercultural dialogue [Video file] Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6kZ9_X6bPA Medel-Anonuevo, C., Ohsako, T., Mauch, W., & United Nations Educational, S. E. (2001). Revisiting Lifelong Learning for the 21st Century. Murniadi, K. (2014). Hofstede cultural dimensions [PowerPoint Slides]. Retrieved from https://learn.kent.edu/webapps/blackboard/content/listContent.jsp?course_id=_86615_1&content_id=_3013333_1&mode=rese National Culture. (n.d.). Retrieved March 21, 2016, from http://geert-hofstede.com/national-culture.html Nelson, Bob and Lundin, Stephen, (2010). Ubuntu!: An Inspiring Story About an African Tradition of Teamwork and Collaboration New York: Crown Publishing Group. Stone. L. Joseph and Joseph Church (1973). Childhood and Adolescence: A Psychology of the Growing Person. New York: Random House.​

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