Ancient Grains: What's Old is New Again

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Jumping off the artisanal breads trend, ancient grains like spelt, kamut and amaranth are now a hot commodity due to their interesting flavors and array of nutrients.

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Ancient Grains: What's Old is New Again

  1. 1. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014CONFIDENTIAL. This document contains trade secret information. Disclosure, use or reproduction outside Cargill or inside Cargill, to or by those employees who do not have a need to know is prohibited except as authorized by Cargill in writing. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved. Ancient Grains www.cargill.com What Was Old Is New Again
  2. 2. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 The Rising Demand Jumping off the artisanal breads trend, ancient grains like spelt, kamut and amaranth are now a hot commodity due to their interesting flavors and array of nutrients. RESTAURANT HIT INDEED, in the latest “What’s Hot in 2014 Culinary Forecast” survey of restaurant chefs by the National Restaurant Association (NRA), 79 percent of chefs surveyed said ancient grains are a growing trend on restaurant menus. In fact, they rank ancient grains 15thout of the 50 top trends. 2 Source: National Restaurant Association’s “What’s Hot in 2014 Culinary Forecast”
  3. 3. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Whole Grain Consumption is On The Rise CONSUMPTION In general, whole grain consumption—including ancient grains—has increased 20 percent from 2005 to 2008, with 18- to 34-year-olds eating 38 percent more than before, according to the Whole Grains Council. 3 Learning more about how their ancient counterparts are hitting the mainstream. Source: Whole Grains Council
  4. 4. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Quinoa
  5. 5. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Quinoa • Perhaps the most well-known ancient grain today, quinoa (“keen- wah”) has already gone mainstream with 78 percent of chefs surveyed by NRA calling it a hot item for 2014. • Although referred to as a grain, quinoa is actually a super seed that can be cooked like rice or barley but in just 10 to 15 minutes. It tastes great on its own, and is gluten free. • Quinoa, (1 cup, cooked) provides 4g fat, 18g protein, 5g fiber, 29% DV magnesium, 28% DV phosphorus, 15% DV iron, 13%DV zinc as well as 19% DV folic acid. It provides nine essential amino acids—the building blocks for protein. • Quinoa is grown in harsh, dry climates, such as its current growing place in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile and Peru. 5 Source: Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried ; Cynthia Harriman, director of food and nutrition strategies, Whole Grains Council, interview ; National Restaurant Association’s “What’s Hot in 2014 Culinary Forecast” ; USDA: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6471
  6. 6. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Polenta
  7. 7. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Polenta • Some restaurant goers may not even be aware that polenta is another ancient grain, as it has nicely infiltrated menus and grocery aisles over the past 10 to 20 years. • Polenta is actually ground yellow or white corn that has had its germ removed. • Peasants mixed grains with water to form a paste that could be cooked on a heated stone. After the 15th or 16th century, Italians began to add cornmeal (and salt at some point) to the dish. This porridge can be fried, baked, boiled, grilled or used instead of pasta. In fact, Northern Italians commonly eat polenta today instead of pasta. 7 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Dining Chicago: Eat this! Polenta, a universal peasant food;
  8. 8. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Polenta • Consumers appreciate that a 1-cup, cooked serving of whole grain polenta provides 11g protein (more than a large egg), 6g fiber (excellent source) and 38% DV iron (when enriched) and 12% DV magnesium. • Polenta is gluten free if no gluten-containing grains are included. 8 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Foodnavigator-usa.com: 10 ancient grains to watch: from kamut to quinoa USDA http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6371?fg=Cereal+Grains+and+Pasta&man=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=&qlookup=
  9. 9. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Farro
  10. 10. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Farro • Farro is pretty well, ancient. This wheat grain, also referred to as emmer, has been around for thousands of years, dating back to the days of the Fertile Crescent. It was once used in Egyptian bread making. Indeed, it is still grown in Italy today. • In Italy, farro is still commonly used in bread, baked goods and soups, pasta, risotto and salads. 10 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Foodnavigator-usa.com: 10 ancient grains to watch: from kamut to quinoa
  11. 11. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Amaranth
  12. 12. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Amaranth • This ancient grain is actually a gluten-free, wheat-free pseudo- cereal that can be used instead of rice. Discovered in Mesoamerica almost 8,000 years ago, amaranth packs a nutritious and nutty-tasting punch. • Amaranth (1 cup, cooked) provides protein (9g protein), as well as 4g fat and 5g fiber (excellent source); 40% DV magnesium, 27% DV iron, 13% DV zinc. • It can be served at breakfast with nuts, dried fruit and milk. Or it can be cooked in water or chicken stock with vegetables for dinner. 12 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Foodnavigator-usa.com: 10 ancient grains to watch: from kamut to quinoa USDA data: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6353?fg=Cereal+Grains+and+Pasta&man=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=&qlookup=
  13. 13. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Spelt
  14. 14. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Spelt • Spelt comes from medieval times, and was popular until industrialization brought fertilizers and mechanical harvesting which proved to be incompatible with it. • The grain, actually a form of wheat, can be a replacement for wheat in recipes but contains gluten. It’s sweet, nutty flavor works well in muffins, waffles, pancakes and bread. • Similar to other ancient grains, spelt is high in nutrients. Spelt (1 cup, cooked) provides 10g protein, 7g fiber (excellent source), 40%DV iron, 29% DV phosphorus, 24% DV niacin, 23% DV magnesium, 16% DV zinc. 14 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Foodnavigator-usa.com: 10 ancient grains to watch: from kamut to quinoa; USDA: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6475
  15. 15. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Kamut
  16. 16. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 Kamut • Kamut is a form of the ancient khorasan wheat variety, perhaps first grown in Egypt or Asia. The grain itself is two to three times the size of wheat, and accordingly holds more protein and amino acids. • One-cup cooked kamut provides 9g protein, 7g fiber (excellent source) as well as 21%DV zinc, 20%DV magnesium and 16%DV iron. • Kamut can be used as a replacement for rice or as a powder for baking. Whole kamut needs to soak for several hours before cooking like dried beans. 16 Source:Coreperformance.com’s12 ancient grains you may have never tried; Foodnavigator-usa.com: 10 ancient grains to watch: from kamut to quinoa; USDA: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6473?fg=Cereal+Grains+and+Pasta&man=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=&qlookup=kamut
  17. 17. © 2013 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.Ancient Grains-April 2014 THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS BELIEVED TO BE TRUE AND CORRECT. ALL STATEMENTS, RECOMMENDATIONS OR SUGGESTIONS ARE MADE WITHOUT GUARANTEE, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. WE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED INCLUDING ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND FREEDOM FROM INFRINGEMENT AND DISCLAIM ALL LIABILITY IN CONNECTIONS WITH THE USE OF THE PRODUCTS OR INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN.

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