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7B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 6-12, 2016THE NATION'S #1 BLACK NEWSPAPER
slug: NELSON
sec: family
pub: 2/25
Head: Live Gospel recording encourages
all to live without fear
Sub: Singer Jonathan Nelson and other
Gospel greats worshiped God together
Photos: Gospel singer Jonathan Nelson
records a live album in front of thousands
at The Faith Center in
Sunrise
About 3,000 people
watched Jonathan Nelson
and other gospel greats
perform at The Faith Cen-
By Gigi Tinsley
gigitinsley812@yahoo.com
Overseer Dr. Harriette
Wilson Greene is known
throughout Miami as a
feeder of both spiritual and
natural food. In November
2015, the ministry distrib-
uted natural food to 5,587
individuals.
GREENE’S BEGINNING
Greene is the daughter of
the late Harry L. Rolle and
Katherine H. Wilson. She is
a product of the Miami-Dade
County Public Schools and a
graduate of Miami Jackson
Senior High School. She re-
ceived her bachelor’s degree
and a doctorate degree from
Jacksonville Theology Uni-
versity.
Greene’s love for people led
her to become a registered
medical assistant, during
which she took care of the
sick. Her occupation led her
to become a minister of the
gospel of Jesus Christ. She
then founded the Omega
Power and Praise Ministry
Inc. located at 4705 NW
17th Ave., in Miami, where
she has served as pastor for
the past 16 years.
Greene, 60, was married to
James Greene Sr. and from
the union came “four beauti-
ful children.” There are two
surviving daughters, Tyra
Griffin and Jade Greene; one
son, James Greene Jr., and
one deceased daughter, Do-
rie L. Washington. She is the
grandmother of nine grand-
Please turn to GREENE 8B
Pastor of the WeekDR. HARRIETTE WILSON GREENE
Overseer Dr. Harriette
Wilson Greene: “An
angel here on earth”
Faith
The Miami Times
Family& MIAMI TIMESMIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 6-12, 2016SECTION B
By Andrea Robinson
arobinson@miamitimesonline.com
Juliette Dice entered the busy Joe
Celestine Recreation Center to get a good
seat for her and her mother, Gheislaine
Vernelet. The daughter was eager to learn
about a program that could increase the
older woman’s recreation options.
The two women were among more than
100 senior citizens who gathered for a
luncheon where the city of North Miami
announced NoMi Golden Silver Senior
Program, which aims to encourage activ-
ity among its residents, ages 55 and up.
The program is designed to enhance the
quality of life among the city’s senior citi-
zens and promote healthy living through
light exercise, yoga, field trips and group
games and meals.
City leaders say 10 percent of North
Miami residents are age 65 and up, and
that figure likely will increase. According
to the World Health Organization, seniors
over age 60 will increase from 12 percent
to 22 percent by 2050. In Florida, the
state with the largest senior population,
amount of seniors will be more than 28
percent by 2020.
Please turn to SENIORS 8B
NORTH MIAMI SENIORS LIVING
LIFE LIKE IT’S GOLDEN, SILVER
City launches new program to boost activity
Guests review brochures with information
about the NoMi Golden Silver Senior Program.
Poet Rebecca “Butterfly”Vaughns
recites an original work to honor seniors.
Mayor Smith Joseph tells a full luncheon
crowd about the importance of senior citizens.
Juliette Dice
and Gheislaine
Vernelet
—MiamiTimes photos/Andrea Robinson
By Greg from Miami
Once upon a time, there was
a man named John.
Now John was not a very
nice man. John was the type
of guy who would hang out
in bars and get into fights.
John was the kind of guy who
would chase the ladies. Did
you know ol' John was in the
Navy and he deserted?
In fact, John was a slave
trader.
Until one day, when John
was out at sea, with his hu-
man cargo, a storm arose.
Now, this was no ordinary
storm. It was the kind of
storm where the waves rose as
high as a mountain, then fell
as low as a valley. It was the
kind of storm where no mat-
ter how big and how bad you
think you are, it brought into
crystal clear focus that: you
are about to die, and there is
nothing you can do about it.
So ol' John did the only
thing he could do at a time
like this — he prayed.
And he was delivered from
the storm.
Then from that day on, John
Newton (1725 - 1807), would
take off the clothing of a slave
trader, and would then put on
the collar of a simple preach-
er. The he sat down and wrote
these words:
"Amazing Grace, how sweet
the sound, that saved a
wretch like me. I once was
lost, but know am found. Was
blind but now I see."
I have often wondered, what
could have been going through
the mind of a man to cause
him to pen such a heartfelt
tone. What deed so vile, what
Please turn to GRACE 8B
Grace. So amazing
Captain John Newton
(1725 - 1807)
By Brooke Henderson
Special to The Miami Times
The New Mount Olive Baptist Church
continued the tradition of Watch Night
services to welcome the new year in a
state of grace on Thursday, Dec. 31,
2015. Services were held at both 7 p.m.
and 10 p.m., starting with scripture and
a prayer and ending with a benediction.
“I used to be one of those people that
went to club on New Years … If you go
ahead and give that cover charge that
you were going to pay at the club it will
help you go into the new year and feel
a little freer,” said Dr. Rosalind Osgood,
before the offering period in front of the
packed church, as a team of ushers val-
iantly squeezed everyone into the pews.
The attendance of Watch Night spans
generations, fostering a habit that en-
sures a safe way of celebrating the new
year. Rows of adult shoulders were inter-
rupted by dips made by little braided
heads and slouching teenagers. A few
“psst, stops” were heard as children
Please turn to NEW YEAR 8B
Celebrating the new year in a new, old way
New Mount Olive Praise Factor members:Stacey Arnette,Danielle S.Thomas,Joy
Edwards, Katrina Poetiss Sapp Holder and Rachelle Carter.
By Lyndia Grant
Special to the NNPA News Wire
The 13 principles to suc-
cess were researched and
studied over a
20-year period by a
man who dedicated
six hours every day
to reading the holy
Bible and then medi-
tated. His name was
Napoleon Hill.
Andrew Carnegie
first suggested to
Hill that he should
contact successful
men across America to come
up with a formula that would
help men and women for
generations to come. Hill did
it without pay. When fin-
ished, Hill published “Think
and Grow Rich” during the
Great Depression. It has sold
more than 70 million copies
worldwide.
The goal of the first princi-
ple of Hill’s 13, “Desire,” is to
remind you that desire could
be anything, from channeling
your energy toward a special
cause to becoming an Olym-
pics Champion, purchasing
a nice home or to
becoming an award-
winning singer. See
yourself already
doing or having the
dream you want so
much.
First, make up in
your mind the exact
goal you desire. You
can’t say, “I want a
new job, or husband,
wife, college degree,
child, career whatever your
dream is; you’ve got to write
it down.” You must see, feel
and believe you are already
in possession of this thing
you dream of.
Second, determine what
you will give in return for the
goal set. You can’t get “some-
thing for nothing.” In the
Please turn to SUCCESS 8B
The Religion Corner:
Several principles
to achieve success
Napolean Hill
City leaders say 10 percent of North
Miami residents are age 65 and up, and
that figure likely will increase. According
to the World Health Organization, seniors
over age 60 will increase from 12 percent
to 22 percent by 2050. In Florida, the
state with the largest senior population,
amount of seniors will be more than 28
SENIORS 8B
NORTH MIAMI SENIORS LIVING
LIFE LIKE IT’S GOLDEN, SILVER
Mayor Smith Joseph tells a full luncheon
crowd about the importance of senior citizens.
Vernelet
—MiamiTimes photos/Andrea Robinson
Councilman Alix
Desulme directs
guests to find
seats before the
start of the lun-
cheon at the Joe
Celestin Center
in North Miami.
Attendees at a Watch Night service on
Dec. 31.  
8B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 6-12, 2016 THE NATION'S #1 BLACK NEWSPAPER
Nov. 2016
April 2016
June 2016
Jan. 2016
May 2016
Jan. 2016
Aug. 2016
Oct. 2016
■ Ann Abraham Ministries, Inc. will
host a Revival on Jan. 7 at 7:30 p.m.
■ The Elks Historical Business and
ConferenceCenterinvitesthecommunity
every Sunday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. for its
Gospel Kickback Entertainment and fine
dining. Call 305-224-1890.
■ The Coconut Ecumenical Network
invites the community to the 23rd
Annual
Dr. MLK, Jr. celebration service on Jan. 17
at Greater St. Paul A.M.E. Church at 3 p.m.
Call 305-539-8545.
■ The Episcopal Church of the
Incarnation presents its 58th
Year Mardi
Gras Dance on Friday, February 5, from
9 p.m. until 2 a.m. at the 901 Event &
Conference Center in Miami Gardens. Call
305-692-0178 or 305-688-7072. 
■ Food and clothing distribution
takes place 4 p.m. every Wednesday at
Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church. Call
786-541-3687.
■ First Haitian Church of God hosts a
food drive every Saturday from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Call 786-362-1804.
■ Sistah to Sistah Connection, Inc.
Outreach Women’s Ministry invites
evangelists, ministers and teachers to
register for Ministerial Training Academy.
Call 786-246-7578.
■ New Day N Christ Deliverance
Ministry invites the community to free
Mind, Body and Soul Enhancements self-
improvement class and Zumba Fitness.
Call 305-691-0018.
■ Florida Independent Restoration
Ministries (FIRM) offers help with family
problems, drugs and alcohol. Call 800-
208-2924 ext. 102 or prayer line, ext 104.
■ A Mission With A New Beginning
Church Women’s Department provides
community feedings. Call 786-371-3779.   
■ Bethany Seventh-Day Adventist
Church hosts bereavement sharing group
meetings 3-4 p.m. every second Sunday.
Call 305-634-2993.
■ Street Evangelist Outreach
Ministries conducts free personal courses
on evangelizing without fear. Call 786-
508-6167.
■ MEC Ministries will be running a
healing service at 7:30 p.m. every fourth
Friday. Call 305-693-1534.
■ Bethel Family Enrichment Center
provides peer to peer behavioral health
and substance abuse support. Call 305-
627-0396.
The deadline for Faith Calendar items is
on or before 2 p.m. Mondays.
vCompiled by The Miami Times staff editorial@miamitimesonline.com
Faith CALENDAR
CHURCHCHURCHCHURCHListings
AFRICAN ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL
St. Peter's African Orthodox Cathedral
Bishop George W. Sands
4841 NW 2nd Avenue • 786-360-3302
BAPTIST
Greater Harvest Baptist Church
Rev. Kenneth McGee
14501 NW 7th Avenue • 305-725-6321
EPISCOPAL
Saint Kevin's Episcopal (Anglican) Church
Rev. Dr. Simeon E. Newbold, Sr.
3280 NW 135th Street • 305-688-8517
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Magnolia Park Church of Christ
Minister Asheley Hepburn
2037 NW 152nd Street • 305-688-0442
New Philadelphia Baptist Church
Pastor Rickie K. Robinson Sr.
1113 N.W. 79th Street • 305-505-0400
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
New Christ Tabernacle Church
Rev. Harold Harsh
1305 NW 54th Street • 305-835-2578
Rock of Ages M.B. Church
Rev. Johnny White, Jr.
2722 NW 55th Street • 305-308-8466
Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Cuurch
Rev. Van Gaskins, Jr., pastor/teacher
7510 NW 15th Avenue • 305-835-0116
Valley Grove Missionary Baptist Church
Elder Johnnie Robinson
1395 NW 69th Street • 305-835-8316
Walking in Christ M.B. Church
Rev. Larry Robbins, Sr.
3530 NW 214th Street • 305-430-0443
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
City Church
Pastor Tony Rivera
3001 NW 22nd Avenue 305-637-3558
Christian Church of Faith
Pastor Thea Jones
303 NW 191st Street • 305-652-1132
Faith Fulfilling Ministries, Inc.
Pastor Vincent Torrence
3601 SW 89th Street • 305-621-2397
God's Storehouse Ministries
Pastor Maxine Miller
4141 North Miami Avenue • 305-573-5711
New Resurrection Community Church
Rev. Dr. Anthony A. Tate
2167 NW 64th Street • 305-342-7426
CATHOLIC
Holy Redeemer Catholic Church
Rev. Alexander Ekechukwu, CSSp
1301 NW 71st Street • 305-691-1701
PENTECOSTAL
New Faith Deliverance Center COGIC
Pastor Willie Gaines
3257 NW 7 Ave. Circle • 305-335-4389
New Life Ministry
Pastor Barbara Boyce
1195 NW 119th Street • 305-308-5064
Warriors For Christ Bible Band
Pastor Luis Alvarado
14626 NW 7 Avenue • 786-419-5818
To join our Church Listings the cost is $52
per year. Please contact 305-694-6210
Nov. 2016
Feb. 2016
Oct. 2016
June 2016
Feb. 2016
Feb. 2016
Nov. 2016
Oct. 2016
Jan. 2016
Aug. 2016
Losing weight isn’t easy. Two-
for-one value meals tempt us
on menus, biggie drinks look
so refreshing and super-size
portions seem really appetiz-
ing. And there is no shortage of
books, magazines and websites
touting the latest and great-
est cure for being overweight.
It can all seem overwhelming.
But there is hope. You can take
small, achievable steps to lose
weight, and also reduce your
risk of developing weight-re-
lated health problems such as
heart disease, diabetes, arthri-
tis and some cancers.
Eating too much and being
physically inactive results in
weight gain. To determine if
you are overweight, estimate
your body mass index (BMI),
which is a calculation of your
body weight relative to height.
Multiply your weight in pounds
by 703 and then divide the re-
sult by your height in inches
two times. A BMI of 18.5 to 25
is considered healthy; 25 to 30
is overweight; 30 or higher is
obese. To maintain your weight,
you must burn enough energy
to equal the calories you eat. To
lose weight, you must use more
calories than you eat.
A weight-control strategy can
begin with setting a realistic
goal. Losing even a few pounds
can improve your health, so
start with a safe weight loss
rate of one-half to two pounds
per week. A successful weight
loss plan will include lifestyle
changes, not just going on a
diet. Cut back on calories eaten
and chose foods from a healthy
assortment of fruits, vegetables
and whole grains. Limit alcohol
consumption that can be high
in calories, but low in nutrients.
Read food labels and pay atten-
tion to serving size. Don’t be
fooled by small packages that
look like one serving size, but
may actually be two or more.
Incorporate exercise into your
weight loss program. You don’t
have to sweat to get a good
workout. Short exercise ses-
sions throughout the day can
be just as effective at burning
calories as an extended ses-
sion. Thirty minutes of moder-
ate to intensive physical activ-
ity is recommended daily to lose
weight and maintain a healthy
weight after weight loss.
If you are at least 100 pounds
overweight and experiencing
difficulties or other medical
problems due to your weight,
you may be a candidate for
gastric bypass surgery. This
surgery reduces the amount of
calories taken in by your body
by either making your stom-
ach smaller or bypassing part
of the stomach and small in-
testines so that fewer calories
are absorbed. Most patients
lose about half of their excess
weight within the first two years
after surgery. Patients who un-
dergo this surgery must make
a strong, lifetime commitment
to a healthy diet and exercise
regime to ensure a successful
weight loss and avoid complica-
tions.
Fad diets may help you lose
weight at first, but they rarely
have a lasting effect. Keep in
mind four common behaviors
that can help ensure the suc-
cess of your weight loss pro-
gram: eat a low-calorie, low-fat
diet; weigh yourself frequently;
be physically active; and don’t
skip breakfast.
Remember that losing weight,
and keeping it off, requires ma-
jor, long-lasting lifestyle chang-
es.
To learn more about weight
loss surgery, attend a seminar 7
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 7 at North
Shore Medical Center, 1100 NW
95th St., in Miami
Winning at weight loss goals
SENIORS
continued from 7B
The NoMi Golden Silver Senior
Program will meet each Wednes-
day starting Jan. 6 at Joe Ce-
lestin Center, 1525 NW 135th
St. The program is open to all
seniors ages 55 and up who live
in North Miami. City officials say
they have space for 75 and a
waiting list of about 25. Before
the luncheon, 68 seniors already
were registered for the program.
Councilman Alix Desulme
made senior services a priority
during his campaign for the city
council last spring. Residents
in his district had complained
about the lack of targeted activi-
ties in the Sunkist Grove area.
“We’re moving toward a more
age-friendly city that is accessi-
ble for everyone,” said Desulme.
He pledged to work more closely
with the North Miami Founda-
tion for Senior Citizens’ Services,
an organization that specializes
in the needs for older residents.
Mayor Smith Joseph said the
program was the city’s way to
“embrace our elderly people.”
Joseph then stopped. “No, let
me correct that. This is the city’s
way to embrace our senior citi-
zens. That sounds better.”
A woman nearby nodded and
applauded the mayor. “Yes,
that’s better. I don’t like elderly,”
she said.
The Golden Silver Senior pro-
gram will add to the menu of
activities the city provides, spe-
cifically for senior residents. The
city has exercise and arts class-
es at Griffing Community Cen-
ter, 12220 Griffing Blvd., located
in the central part of the city.
Parks and Recreation Direc-
tor Derrick Corker said if the
program is successful it might
expand. That hinges on the city
providing more funds or getting
grants for such endeavors.
Judy Brown, president of the
Sunkist Grove Neighborhood As-
sociation, said the Griffing cen-
ter was not accessible for many
of the elderly residents in her
area. Some did not know about
the services, she said.
“Elderly are home all day by
themselves. There was no trans-
portation to get our seniors to
Griffing. No one felt it necessary
to inform us there was such a
program. Those were the ques-
tions that we were asking,”
Brown said.
“Our residents do not have ac-
cess to the services that are pro-
vided for seniors in other parts
of North Miami.”
Brown is cautiously optimistic
about the new program. “I’m go-
ing to wait and see how it mate-
rializes.”
Dice was impressed enough
to sign up her mother, and her
older sister, who didn’t attend.
“This is a good program for
them,” Dice said.
Her mom, Vernelet, a retired
nursing assistant, welcomed the
chance at new activities.
“I’m not doing anything at the
house. It might be fun,” she said.
NEW YEAR
continued from 7B
fidgeted towards the end of the
more than two-hour service.
But when the bible was read,
most church members stood in
respect. After praise and wor-
ship and the congregational
hymn, the church put on a
small skit focused on the char-
acter psychic Sadie. Her crys-
tal ball was used to remind the
parish not only what the bible
says about soothsayers, but
also the fact that it is never too
late to try Jesus. With a little
humor, those vices that pop up
around the new year were ad-
dressed. One of the songs that
the dance ministry, New Mount
Olive Praise Factor, used cap-
tured the sentiment of Watch
Night: “My world needs you
right now.”
The world first experienced
Watch Night as Freedom’s Eve
as a celebration for the legal
end of slavery in the Confeder-
acy. The Emancipation Procla-
mation came into effect at mid-
night on December 31, 1862,
and from that year forward New
Year’s Eve became a night of
prayer and hope in the Black
community. The practice still
remains important as the com-
munity thanks God for carry-
ing them through another year
while remembering their own
who didn’t make it, like Flori-
da’s own Corey Jones and oth-
ers whose names are unknown.
The parishioners in attendance
expressed gratitude for the past
year and a need for the hand of
God in their lives in the next.
The tradition of Watch Night
has modernized but that at-
titude has remained the same.
Usually in the five last minutes
before midnight everyone able
will kneel and face the new year
in prayer; This year, Mount Ol-
ive spent these minutes receiv-
ing a message from their Pastor,
Marcus D. Davidson. “You hear
people say … cut some people
off, not fooling with ‘em any-
more … Some people have said
that for four, five years and still
dealing with the same people.
By Jan. 8 they’ve stopped go-
ing to the gym. They’re looking
in the mirror and saying, ‘Well, I
don’t look that bad.’” His words
were shadowed by the keyboard
swelling and fading behind each
phrase, but the music didn’t de-
tract from his point: people say
they want change but they don’t
want to give up the benefits of
being the way the way they are.
At 12:02, church members
welcomed each other, turning
to their neighbors and entering
the new year as a congregation.
“Neighbor, do you really want
to change?” asked the pastor.
At the end of the year, resolu-
tions abound. With this differ-
ent way of celebrating the new
year, those resolutions might
actually happen. The message
of the night was clear: “If you
want to change, get in the right
place.”
GREENE
continued from 7B
children: Ashley, Terence, Jamil,
Jamel, Christopher, Caleia,
Jaiden, Danvondra and Jayden.
Greene is also very proud of
her children’s achievements. All
three have attended college and
two are college graduates.
SOCIAL AND CIVIC
INVOLVEMENT
Greene was a team parent for
the Charles Hadley’s Liberty City
Warriors, where her son was a
football player and daughter was
a cheerleader, She cooked a hot
meal after every game ensuring
no child or coach went home
hungry after a long, extended
day. Her life was centered on the
children, which led her become
a band parent. She was the PTA
president at Merrick Elementary
School, PTA president at Ear-
lington Heights Elementary, and
PTA board member at Allapattah
Middle School. Currently, she
is the PTSA president at Miami
Jackson Senior High School.
Greene started the Football
Parent’s Booster Club at Miami
Jackson Senior High School in
1995 and today she is still active
in the booster club even though
she currently has no children at
the school. As expected, she still
cooks the pre-game and post-
game meals. Greene is on the
ESSAC committee at Liberty City
Elementary and is a business
partner at Allapattah Middle and
Miami Jackson.
Greene is the Chaplain for
the Miami Jackson Senior High
Alumni Association, a member
of ICARE of Miami, The Liberty
City Collation for Change, Chair-
man of Community Involvement
for Urban Core Coalition, Mem-
ber of the ETO Taskforce, an as-
sociate of the MCI (Miami Chil-
dren’s Initiative), Urban League
IOU Parents, and a member of
the Christmas on 15th Avenue
Committee in Liberty City.
NATURAL FOOD/PROGRAMS
The outreach ministry of Ome-
ga Power and Praise Ministry
Inc. is well known for the long
lines it has in front of church ev-
ery Monday. The ministry feeds
consistently 200 families and
no less than 3,200 individuals
monthly. Greene supervises var-
ious annual programs through
the ministry, including: The
Volunteer’s Appreciation Ban-
quet, Seniors Valentine’s Day
Banquet, which will be held on
Feb. 12; Easter Basket giveaway
where 17 elementary schools re-
ceive 40-50 vouchers to pick up
their baskets at Charles Hadley
Park.
Additional programs are:
Mother Day Banquet, Summer
Camp, Youth Explosion/Back to
School Jam, Thanksgiving Come
Dine With Us Dinners, Christ-
mas Toys for Tots Give-away
and Senior Christmas Dinner/
Gift giveaway.
In addition to her weekly feed-
ings, free summer camp for chil-
dren and free summer lunch
programs, Green also provided
daily breakfasts and lunches
for Miami Jackson and Miami
Northwestern football teams,
throughout the summer of 2015.
Greene has been described
by many as “an angel here on
earth.”
Golden living for N. Miami seniors
Welcoming,watchinginanewyear
Greene: A blessing and an angel
SUCCESS
continued from 7B
third step, establish a definite
date when you intend to get it.
Fourth, create a definite step-by-
step plan for carrying it out. Fifth,
write out a clear, concise state-
ment of what it is you desire, and
begin immediately, ready or not,
get moving. Sixth, read your writ-
ten statement aloud in the morn-
ing and at night. As you read, see,
feel and believe with faith in God
that you are already in posses-
sion of whatever it is you desire. It
should read something like this:
I know that I have the ability
to achieve the object of my Defi-
nite Purpose in life; therefore, I
demand of myself ongoing action
that moves me toward my goal,
and I promise to deliver on this
promise.
I know the dominating
thoughts of my mind will gradu-
ally grow and become real, with
daily physical steps taken that
will gradually change themselves
into something real; therefore, I
concentrate my thoughts for 30
minutes daily upon the task of
thinking of the person I intend
to become, seeing myself already
there.
I know through the principle of
speaking my goal aloud, any de-
sire I hold in my mind will even-
tually become a reality; there-
fore, I devote 10 minutes daily to
demanding of myself the devel-
opment of self-confidence.
I have clearly written down a
description of my definite chief
aim in life, and I will never stop
trying until I shall have devel-
oped sufficient self-confidence to
make it a reality.
I fully realize no wealth or po-
sition can last unless built upon
truth and justice; therefore, I
don’t get involved in a thing that
does not benefit all whom it af-
fects. I succeed by attracting to
myself the forces I wish to use
and the cooperation of other peo-
ple.
Lyndia Grant is an author,
inspirational and motivational
speaker, radio talk show host
and columnist. Visit her new
website at www.lyndiagrant.com
or call 202-558-2107.
Create a definite plan for success
GRACE
continued from 7B
act so cruel could have caused
him to bare his soul to the
world? Baring all, he show the
totality of his life in the lyrics of
one song.
Raw and naked, his pain and
shame laid open for the whole
world to see exactly who, and
what he truly is. He was a sail-
or, a slave trader in fact. But
was even his involvement in
that most despicable of trades
enough to finally make him fall
to his knees, and open his eyes
for the first time, and let him
see how, in spite of his posses-
sions, his wealth and status,
how lost he truly was?
As all men do, when the
storm arose, Newton bargained
with the Lord for his life. But
after the storm, as men seldom
do, John Newton kept his prom-
ise to the Lord of his salvation,
turning to the clergy and show-
ing others how they, too, could
find grace everlasting.
But, what is it about Newton’s
lonesome tone that reverberates
across the centuries to us to-
day, making it one of the most
recognizable songs in the entire
English-speaking language. It is
estimated that these words are
performed more than 10 million
times each and every year.
In the honesty of this song,
homes and possessions are all
stripped away, leaving only a
soul naked and humbled, con-
victed before his/her personal
misdeeds and shame.
Yet, even as we are stripped
naked and our shame revealed,
the song also lifts us up, bea-
coning to us that even in our
misdeeds, there is an out-
stretched hand willing to save
us, if only we would accept it.
Take it! And you too will be
saved!
Oct. 2016
Amazing Grace lifts and saves too
Jorge L. Sosa

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watch night article

  • 1. 7B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 6-12, 2016THE NATION'S #1 BLACK NEWSPAPER slug: NELSON sec: family pub: 2/25 Head: Live Gospel recording encourages all to live without fear Sub: Singer Jonathan Nelson and other Gospel greats worshiped God together Photos: Gospel singer Jonathan Nelson records a live album in front of thousands at The Faith Center in Sunrise About 3,000 people watched Jonathan Nelson and other gospel greats perform at The Faith Cen- By Gigi Tinsley gigitinsley812@yahoo.com Overseer Dr. Harriette Wilson Greene is known throughout Miami as a feeder of both spiritual and natural food. In November 2015, the ministry distrib- uted natural food to 5,587 individuals. GREENE’S BEGINNING Greene is the daughter of the late Harry L. Rolle and Katherine H. Wilson. She is a product of the Miami-Dade County Public Schools and a graduate of Miami Jackson Senior High School. She re- ceived her bachelor’s degree and a doctorate degree from Jacksonville Theology Uni- versity. Greene’s love for people led her to become a registered medical assistant, during which she took care of the sick. Her occupation led her to become a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ. She then founded the Omega Power and Praise Ministry Inc. located at 4705 NW 17th Ave., in Miami, where she has served as pastor for the past 16 years. Greene, 60, was married to James Greene Sr. and from the union came “four beauti- ful children.” There are two surviving daughters, Tyra Griffin and Jade Greene; one son, James Greene Jr., and one deceased daughter, Do- rie L. Washington. She is the grandmother of nine grand- Please turn to GREENE 8B Pastor of the WeekDR. HARRIETTE WILSON GREENE Overseer Dr. Harriette Wilson Greene: “An angel here on earth” Faith The Miami Times Family& MIAMI TIMESMIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 6-12, 2016SECTION B By Andrea Robinson arobinson@miamitimesonline.com Juliette Dice entered the busy Joe Celestine Recreation Center to get a good seat for her and her mother, Gheislaine Vernelet. The daughter was eager to learn about a program that could increase the older woman’s recreation options. The two women were among more than 100 senior citizens who gathered for a luncheon where the city of North Miami announced NoMi Golden Silver Senior Program, which aims to encourage activ- ity among its residents, ages 55 and up. The program is designed to enhance the quality of life among the city’s senior citi- zens and promote healthy living through light exercise, yoga, field trips and group games and meals. City leaders say 10 percent of North Miami residents are age 65 and up, and that figure likely will increase. According to the World Health Organization, seniors over age 60 will increase from 12 percent to 22 percent by 2050. In Florida, the state with the largest senior population, amount of seniors will be more than 28 percent by 2020. Please turn to SENIORS 8B NORTH MIAMI SENIORS LIVING LIFE LIKE IT’S GOLDEN, SILVER City launches new program to boost activity Guests review brochures with information about the NoMi Golden Silver Senior Program. Poet Rebecca “Butterfly”Vaughns recites an original work to honor seniors. Mayor Smith Joseph tells a full luncheon crowd about the importance of senior citizens. Juliette Dice and Gheislaine Vernelet —MiamiTimes photos/Andrea Robinson By Greg from Miami Once upon a time, there was a man named John. Now John was not a very nice man. John was the type of guy who would hang out in bars and get into fights. John was the kind of guy who would chase the ladies. Did you know ol' John was in the Navy and he deserted? In fact, John was a slave trader. Until one day, when John was out at sea, with his hu- man cargo, a storm arose. Now, this was no ordinary storm. It was the kind of storm where the waves rose as high as a mountain, then fell as low as a valley. It was the kind of storm where no mat- ter how big and how bad you think you are, it brought into crystal clear focus that: you are about to die, and there is nothing you can do about it. So ol' John did the only thing he could do at a time like this — he prayed. And he was delivered from the storm. Then from that day on, John Newton (1725 - 1807), would take off the clothing of a slave trader, and would then put on the collar of a simple preach- er. The he sat down and wrote these words: "Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost, but know am found. Was blind but now I see." I have often wondered, what could have been going through the mind of a man to cause him to pen such a heartfelt tone. What deed so vile, what Please turn to GRACE 8B Grace. So amazing Captain John Newton (1725 - 1807) By Brooke Henderson Special to The Miami Times The New Mount Olive Baptist Church continued the tradition of Watch Night services to welcome the new year in a state of grace on Thursday, Dec. 31, 2015. Services were held at both 7 p.m. and 10 p.m., starting with scripture and a prayer and ending with a benediction. “I used to be one of those people that went to club on New Years … If you go ahead and give that cover charge that you were going to pay at the club it will help you go into the new year and feel a little freer,” said Dr. Rosalind Osgood, before the offering period in front of the packed church, as a team of ushers val- iantly squeezed everyone into the pews. The attendance of Watch Night spans generations, fostering a habit that en- sures a safe way of celebrating the new year. Rows of adult shoulders were inter- rupted by dips made by little braided heads and slouching teenagers. A few “psst, stops” were heard as children Please turn to NEW YEAR 8B Celebrating the new year in a new, old way New Mount Olive Praise Factor members:Stacey Arnette,Danielle S.Thomas,Joy Edwards, Katrina Poetiss Sapp Holder and Rachelle Carter. By Lyndia Grant Special to the NNPA News Wire The 13 principles to suc- cess were researched and studied over a 20-year period by a man who dedicated six hours every day to reading the holy Bible and then medi- tated. His name was Napoleon Hill. Andrew Carnegie first suggested to Hill that he should contact successful men across America to come up with a formula that would help men and women for generations to come. Hill did it without pay. When fin- ished, Hill published “Think and Grow Rich” during the Great Depression. It has sold more than 70 million copies worldwide. The goal of the first princi- ple of Hill’s 13, “Desire,” is to remind you that desire could be anything, from channeling your energy toward a special cause to becoming an Olym- pics Champion, purchasing a nice home or to becoming an award- winning singer. See yourself already doing or having the dream you want so much. First, make up in your mind the exact goal you desire. You can’t say, “I want a new job, or husband, wife, college degree, child, career whatever your dream is; you’ve got to write it down.” You must see, feel and believe you are already in possession of this thing you dream of. Second, determine what you will give in return for the goal set. You can’t get “some- thing for nothing.” In the Please turn to SUCCESS 8B The Religion Corner: Several principles to achieve success Napolean Hill City leaders say 10 percent of North Miami residents are age 65 and up, and that figure likely will increase. According to the World Health Organization, seniors over age 60 will increase from 12 percent to 22 percent by 2050. In Florida, the state with the largest senior population, amount of seniors will be more than 28 SENIORS 8B NORTH MIAMI SENIORS LIVING LIFE LIKE IT’S GOLDEN, SILVER Mayor Smith Joseph tells a full luncheon crowd about the importance of senior citizens. Vernelet —MiamiTimes photos/Andrea Robinson Councilman Alix Desulme directs guests to find seats before the start of the lun- cheon at the Joe Celestin Center in North Miami. Attendees at a Watch Night service on Dec. 31.  
  • 2. 8B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 6-12, 2016 THE NATION'S #1 BLACK NEWSPAPER Nov. 2016 April 2016 June 2016 Jan. 2016 May 2016 Jan. 2016 Aug. 2016 Oct. 2016 ■ Ann Abraham Ministries, Inc. will host a Revival on Jan. 7 at 7:30 p.m. ■ The Elks Historical Business and ConferenceCenterinvitesthecommunity every Sunday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. for its Gospel Kickback Entertainment and fine dining. Call 305-224-1890. ■ The Coconut Ecumenical Network invites the community to the 23rd Annual Dr. MLK, Jr. celebration service on Jan. 17 at Greater St. Paul A.M.E. Church at 3 p.m. Call 305-539-8545. ■ The Episcopal Church of the Incarnation presents its 58th Year Mardi Gras Dance on Friday, February 5, from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m. at the 901 Event & Conference Center in Miami Gardens. Call 305-692-0178 or 305-688-7072.  ■ Food and clothing distribution takes place 4 p.m. every Wednesday at Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church. Call 786-541-3687. ■ First Haitian Church of God hosts a food drive every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 786-362-1804. ■ Sistah to Sistah Connection, Inc. Outreach Women’s Ministry invites evangelists, ministers and teachers to register for Ministerial Training Academy. Call 786-246-7578. ■ New Day N Christ Deliverance Ministry invites the community to free Mind, Body and Soul Enhancements self- improvement class and Zumba Fitness. Call 305-691-0018. ■ Florida Independent Restoration Ministries (FIRM) offers help with family problems, drugs and alcohol. Call 800- 208-2924 ext. 102 or prayer line, ext 104. ■ A Mission With A New Beginning Church Women’s Department provides community feedings. Call 786-371-3779.    ■ Bethany Seventh-Day Adventist Church hosts bereavement sharing group meetings 3-4 p.m. every second Sunday. Call 305-634-2993. ■ Street Evangelist Outreach Ministries conducts free personal courses on evangelizing without fear. Call 786- 508-6167. ■ MEC Ministries will be running a healing service at 7:30 p.m. every fourth Friday. Call 305-693-1534. ■ Bethel Family Enrichment Center provides peer to peer behavioral health and substance abuse support. Call 305- 627-0396. The deadline for Faith Calendar items is on or before 2 p.m. Mondays. vCompiled by The Miami Times staff editorial@miamitimesonline.com Faith CALENDAR CHURCHCHURCHCHURCHListings AFRICAN ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL St. Peter's African Orthodox Cathedral Bishop George W. Sands 4841 NW 2nd Avenue • 786-360-3302 BAPTIST Greater Harvest Baptist Church Rev. Kenneth McGee 14501 NW 7th Avenue • 305-725-6321 EPISCOPAL Saint Kevin's Episcopal (Anglican) Church Rev. Dr. Simeon E. Newbold, Sr. 3280 NW 135th Street • 305-688-8517 CHURCH OF CHRIST Magnolia Park Church of Christ Minister Asheley Hepburn 2037 NW 152nd Street • 305-688-0442 New Philadelphia Baptist Church Pastor Rickie K. Robinson Sr. 1113 N.W. 79th Street • 305-505-0400 MISSIONARY BAPTIST New Christ Tabernacle Church Rev. Harold Harsh 1305 NW 54th Street • 305-835-2578 Rock of Ages M.B. Church Rev. Johnny White, Jr. 2722 NW 55th Street • 305-308-8466 Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Cuurch Rev. Van Gaskins, Jr., pastor/teacher 7510 NW 15th Avenue • 305-835-0116 Valley Grove Missionary Baptist Church Elder Johnnie Robinson 1395 NW 69th Street • 305-835-8316 Walking in Christ M.B. Church Rev. Larry Robbins, Sr. 3530 NW 214th Street • 305-430-0443 NON-DENOMINATIONAL City Church Pastor Tony Rivera 3001 NW 22nd Avenue 305-637-3558 Christian Church of Faith Pastor Thea Jones 303 NW 191st Street • 305-652-1132 Faith Fulfilling Ministries, Inc. Pastor Vincent Torrence 3601 SW 89th Street • 305-621-2397 God's Storehouse Ministries Pastor Maxine Miller 4141 North Miami Avenue • 305-573-5711 New Resurrection Community Church Rev. Dr. Anthony A. Tate 2167 NW 64th Street • 305-342-7426 CATHOLIC Holy Redeemer Catholic Church Rev. Alexander Ekechukwu, CSSp 1301 NW 71st Street • 305-691-1701 PENTECOSTAL New Faith Deliverance Center COGIC Pastor Willie Gaines 3257 NW 7 Ave. Circle • 305-335-4389 New Life Ministry Pastor Barbara Boyce 1195 NW 119th Street • 305-308-5064 Warriors For Christ Bible Band Pastor Luis Alvarado 14626 NW 7 Avenue • 786-419-5818 To join our Church Listings the cost is $52 per year. Please contact 305-694-6210 Nov. 2016 Feb. 2016 Oct. 2016 June 2016 Feb. 2016 Feb. 2016 Nov. 2016 Oct. 2016 Jan. 2016 Aug. 2016 Losing weight isn’t easy. Two- for-one value meals tempt us on menus, biggie drinks look so refreshing and super-size portions seem really appetiz- ing. And there is no shortage of books, magazines and websites touting the latest and great- est cure for being overweight. It can all seem overwhelming. But there is hope. You can take small, achievable steps to lose weight, and also reduce your risk of developing weight-re- lated health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, arthri- tis and some cancers. Eating too much and being physically inactive results in weight gain. To determine if you are overweight, estimate your body mass index (BMI), which is a calculation of your body weight relative to height. Multiply your weight in pounds by 703 and then divide the re- sult by your height in inches two times. A BMI of 18.5 to 25 is considered healthy; 25 to 30 is overweight; 30 or higher is obese. To maintain your weight, you must burn enough energy to equal the calories you eat. To lose weight, you must use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy can begin with setting a realistic goal. Losing even a few pounds can improve your health, so start with a safe weight loss rate of one-half to two pounds per week. A successful weight loss plan will include lifestyle changes, not just going on a diet. Cut back on calories eaten and chose foods from a healthy assortment of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Limit alcohol consumption that can be high in calories, but low in nutrients. Read food labels and pay atten- tion to serving size. Don’t be fooled by small packages that look like one serving size, but may actually be two or more. Incorporate exercise into your weight loss program. You don’t have to sweat to get a good workout. Short exercise ses- sions throughout the day can be just as effective at burning calories as an extended ses- sion. Thirty minutes of moder- ate to intensive physical activ- ity is recommended daily to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight after weight loss. If you are at least 100 pounds overweight and experiencing difficulties or other medical problems due to your weight, you may be a candidate for gastric bypass surgery. This surgery reduces the amount of calories taken in by your body by either making your stom- ach smaller or bypassing part of the stomach and small in- testines so that fewer calories are absorbed. Most patients lose about half of their excess weight within the first two years after surgery. Patients who un- dergo this surgery must make a strong, lifetime commitment to a healthy diet and exercise regime to ensure a successful weight loss and avoid complica- tions. Fad diets may help you lose weight at first, but they rarely have a lasting effect. Keep in mind four common behaviors that can help ensure the suc- cess of your weight loss pro- gram: eat a low-calorie, low-fat diet; weigh yourself frequently; be physically active; and don’t skip breakfast. Remember that losing weight, and keeping it off, requires ma- jor, long-lasting lifestyle chang- es. To learn more about weight loss surgery, attend a seminar 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 7 at North Shore Medical Center, 1100 NW 95th St., in Miami Winning at weight loss goals SENIORS continued from 7B The NoMi Golden Silver Senior Program will meet each Wednes- day starting Jan. 6 at Joe Ce- lestin Center, 1525 NW 135th St. The program is open to all seniors ages 55 and up who live in North Miami. City officials say they have space for 75 and a waiting list of about 25. Before the luncheon, 68 seniors already were registered for the program. Councilman Alix Desulme made senior services a priority during his campaign for the city council last spring. Residents in his district had complained about the lack of targeted activi- ties in the Sunkist Grove area. “We’re moving toward a more age-friendly city that is accessi- ble for everyone,” said Desulme. He pledged to work more closely with the North Miami Founda- tion for Senior Citizens’ Services, an organization that specializes in the needs for older residents. Mayor Smith Joseph said the program was the city’s way to “embrace our elderly people.” Joseph then stopped. “No, let me correct that. This is the city’s way to embrace our senior citi- zens. That sounds better.” A woman nearby nodded and applauded the mayor. “Yes, that’s better. I don’t like elderly,” she said. The Golden Silver Senior pro- gram will add to the menu of activities the city provides, spe- cifically for senior residents. The city has exercise and arts class- es at Griffing Community Cen- ter, 12220 Griffing Blvd., located in the central part of the city. Parks and Recreation Direc- tor Derrick Corker said if the program is successful it might expand. That hinges on the city providing more funds or getting grants for such endeavors. Judy Brown, president of the Sunkist Grove Neighborhood As- sociation, said the Griffing cen- ter was not accessible for many of the elderly residents in her area. Some did not know about the services, she said. “Elderly are home all day by themselves. There was no trans- portation to get our seniors to Griffing. No one felt it necessary to inform us there was such a program. Those were the ques- tions that we were asking,” Brown said. “Our residents do not have ac- cess to the services that are pro- vided for seniors in other parts of North Miami.” Brown is cautiously optimistic about the new program. “I’m go- ing to wait and see how it mate- rializes.” Dice was impressed enough to sign up her mother, and her older sister, who didn’t attend. “This is a good program for them,” Dice said. Her mom, Vernelet, a retired nursing assistant, welcomed the chance at new activities. “I’m not doing anything at the house. It might be fun,” she said. NEW YEAR continued from 7B fidgeted towards the end of the more than two-hour service. But when the bible was read, most church members stood in respect. After praise and wor- ship and the congregational hymn, the church put on a small skit focused on the char- acter psychic Sadie. Her crys- tal ball was used to remind the parish not only what the bible says about soothsayers, but also the fact that it is never too late to try Jesus. With a little humor, those vices that pop up around the new year were ad- dressed. One of the songs that the dance ministry, New Mount Olive Praise Factor, used cap- tured the sentiment of Watch Night: “My world needs you right now.” The world first experienced Watch Night as Freedom’s Eve as a celebration for the legal end of slavery in the Confeder- acy. The Emancipation Procla- mation came into effect at mid- night on December 31, 1862, and from that year forward New Year’s Eve became a night of prayer and hope in the Black community. The practice still remains important as the com- munity thanks God for carry- ing them through another year while remembering their own who didn’t make it, like Flori- da’s own Corey Jones and oth- ers whose names are unknown. The parishioners in attendance expressed gratitude for the past year and a need for the hand of God in their lives in the next. The tradition of Watch Night has modernized but that at- titude has remained the same. Usually in the five last minutes before midnight everyone able will kneel and face the new year in prayer; This year, Mount Ol- ive spent these minutes receiv- ing a message from their Pastor, Marcus D. Davidson. “You hear people say … cut some people off, not fooling with ‘em any- more … Some people have said that for four, five years and still dealing with the same people. By Jan. 8 they’ve stopped go- ing to the gym. They’re looking in the mirror and saying, ‘Well, I don’t look that bad.’” His words were shadowed by the keyboard swelling and fading behind each phrase, but the music didn’t de- tract from his point: people say they want change but they don’t want to give up the benefits of being the way the way they are. At 12:02, church members welcomed each other, turning to their neighbors and entering the new year as a congregation. “Neighbor, do you really want to change?” asked the pastor. At the end of the year, resolu- tions abound. With this differ- ent way of celebrating the new year, those resolutions might actually happen. The message of the night was clear: “If you want to change, get in the right place.” GREENE continued from 7B children: Ashley, Terence, Jamil, Jamel, Christopher, Caleia, Jaiden, Danvondra and Jayden. Greene is also very proud of her children’s achievements. All three have attended college and two are college graduates. SOCIAL AND CIVIC INVOLVEMENT Greene was a team parent for the Charles Hadley’s Liberty City Warriors, where her son was a football player and daughter was a cheerleader, She cooked a hot meal after every game ensuring no child or coach went home hungry after a long, extended day. Her life was centered on the children, which led her become a band parent. She was the PTA president at Merrick Elementary School, PTA president at Ear- lington Heights Elementary, and PTA board member at Allapattah Middle School. Currently, she is the PTSA president at Miami Jackson Senior High School. Greene started the Football Parent’s Booster Club at Miami Jackson Senior High School in 1995 and today she is still active in the booster club even though she currently has no children at the school. As expected, she still cooks the pre-game and post- game meals. Greene is on the ESSAC committee at Liberty City Elementary and is a business partner at Allapattah Middle and Miami Jackson. Greene is the Chaplain for the Miami Jackson Senior High Alumni Association, a member of ICARE of Miami, The Liberty City Collation for Change, Chair- man of Community Involvement for Urban Core Coalition, Mem- ber of the ETO Taskforce, an as- sociate of the MCI (Miami Chil- dren’s Initiative), Urban League IOU Parents, and a member of the Christmas on 15th Avenue Committee in Liberty City. NATURAL FOOD/PROGRAMS The outreach ministry of Ome- ga Power and Praise Ministry Inc. is well known for the long lines it has in front of church ev- ery Monday. The ministry feeds consistently 200 families and no less than 3,200 individuals monthly. Greene supervises var- ious annual programs through the ministry, including: The Volunteer’s Appreciation Ban- quet, Seniors Valentine’s Day Banquet, which will be held on Feb. 12; Easter Basket giveaway where 17 elementary schools re- ceive 40-50 vouchers to pick up their baskets at Charles Hadley Park. Additional programs are: Mother Day Banquet, Summer Camp, Youth Explosion/Back to School Jam, Thanksgiving Come Dine With Us Dinners, Christ- mas Toys for Tots Give-away and Senior Christmas Dinner/ Gift giveaway. In addition to her weekly feed- ings, free summer camp for chil- dren and free summer lunch programs, Green also provided daily breakfasts and lunches for Miami Jackson and Miami Northwestern football teams, throughout the summer of 2015. Greene has been described by many as “an angel here on earth.” Golden living for N. Miami seniors Welcoming,watchinginanewyear Greene: A blessing and an angel SUCCESS continued from 7B third step, establish a definite date when you intend to get it. Fourth, create a definite step-by- step plan for carrying it out. Fifth, write out a clear, concise state- ment of what it is you desire, and begin immediately, ready or not, get moving. Sixth, read your writ- ten statement aloud in the morn- ing and at night. As you read, see, feel and believe with faith in God that you are already in posses- sion of whatever it is you desire. It should read something like this: I know that I have the ability to achieve the object of my Defi- nite Purpose in life; therefore, I demand of myself ongoing action that moves me toward my goal, and I promise to deliver on this promise. I know the dominating thoughts of my mind will gradu- ally grow and become real, with daily physical steps taken that will gradually change themselves into something real; therefore, I concentrate my thoughts for 30 minutes daily upon the task of thinking of the person I intend to become, seeing myself already there. I know through the principle of speaking my goal aloud, any de- sire I hold in my mind will even- tually become a reality; there- fore, I devote 10 minutes daily to demanding of myself the devel- opment of self-confidence. I have clearly written down a description of my definite chief aim in life, and I will never stop trying until I shall have devel- oped sufficient self-confidence to make it a reality. I fully realize no wealth or po- sition can last unless built upon truth and justice; therefore, I don’t get involved in a thing that does not benefit all whom it af- fects. I succeed by attracting to myself the forces I wish to use and the cooperation of other peo- ple. Lyndia Grant is an author, inspirational and motivational speaker, radio talk show host and columnist. Visit her new website at www.lyndiagrant.com or call 202-558-2107. Create a definite plan for success GRACE continued from 7B act so cruel could have caused him to bare his soul to the world? Baring all, he show the totality of his life in the lyrics of one song. Raw and naked, his pain and shame laid open for the whole world to see exactly who, and what he truly is. He was a sail- or, a slave trader in fact. But was even his involvement in that most despicable of trades enough to finally make him fall to his knees, and open his eyes for the first time, and let him see how, in spite of his posses- sions, his wealth and status, how lost he truly was? As all men do, when the storm arose, Newton bargained with the Lord for his life. But after the storm, as men seldom do, John Newton kept his prom- ise to the Lord of his salvation, turning to the clergy and show- ing others how they, too, could find grace everlasting. But, what is it about Newton’s lonesome tone that reverberates across the centuries to us to- day, making it one of the most recognizable songs in the entire English-speaking language. It is estimated that these words are performed more than 10 million times each and every year. In the honesty of this song, homes and possessions are all stripped away, leaving only a soul naked and humbled, con- victed before his/her personal misdeeds and shame. Yet, even as we are stripped naked and our shame revealed, the song also lifts us up, bea- coning to us that even in our misdeeds, there is an out- stretched hand willing to save us, if only we would accept it. Take it! And you too will be saved! Oct. 2016 Amazing Grace lifts and saves too Jorge L. Sosa