Critical 5 to succeed as agile product manager using scrum

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This presentation discuss the 5 Critical factors for Product Managers using SCRUM to succeed

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Critical 5 to succeed as agile product manager using scrum

  1. 1. 1 Agile Product Management Using SCRUM Bimlesh Gundurao CEO Aguai Solutions Critical 5 to Succeed
  2. 2. 2 A Business, Technology and Talent Development Consulting Company with focus on Healthcare , Retail & IT Business Technology People Vision To become the most preferred business partner to our customers through leadership in our actions, values and social responsibility Mission To be a world class organization in enabling clients to become Leaders in their industry Values LEAD by Example Leadership, Empower, Agile, Decisive www.aguaisolutions.com
  3. 3. 3 Critical 5 1. Agile Product Management is different! 2. Product Owner vs Product Manager 3. Making this work in an Enterprise 4. Common Pitfalls 5. Critical Success Factors
  4. 4. 4 Sprint 1-4 Weeks Potentially Shippable Product Increment Product Owner Review No Changes in Duration or Goal Retrospective Team Daily Scrum Meeting and Artifacts Update Input from End-Users, Customers, Team and Other Stakeholders Product Backlog Sprint Backlog Product Backlog Refinement 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 13 Sprint Planning Meeting Team Selects How Much To Commit To Do By Sprint’s End ScrumMaster SCRUM
  5. 5. 5 Goal of Product Management To deliver measurable business results through product solutions that meet both market needs and company objectives Don Vendetti – http://wp.me/pXBON-WE
  6. 6. 6 Thinkers Product Managers as Thinkers to ADAPT to changing market needs and responding to change faster than the competitor and sometimes than the market itself
  7. 7. 7 Adaptive Productizing ProcessTM 7 Best Practices Approach to productizing, managing products and services predictably What does Product Management do?
  8. 8. 8 How does it fit in? Product Management Executives Budgets, staff, targets Strategy, forecasts, commitments, roadmaps, competitive intelligence Development Market information, MRD, priorities, roadmaps, requirements, personas, user stories…. Mktg & Sales + Markets & Customers Segmentation, messages, benefits/features, pricing, qualification, demos…. Field inputs, Market feedback
  9. 9. 9 The KEY Question
  10. 10. 10 Product Lifecycle OBJECTIVES
  11. 11. 11 What is Agile Development?
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. 13 Agile Product Management is Different! Different in 5ways
  14. 14. 14 1. Managing Roadmap Act Small
  15. 15. 15 2. Collaboration
  16. 16. 16 3. Customer Feedback Source – www.romanpichler.com
  17. 17. 17 4. Focus Business Value
  18. 18. 18 5. Making Progress Visible http://www.sw-engineering-candies.com/
  19. 19. 19 Agile Only for Websites! – Think Again • Commercial software • In-house development • Contract development • Fixed-price projects • Financial applications • ISO 9001-certified applications • Embedded systems • 24x7 systems with 99.999% uptime requirements • Software as a Service • Video game development • FDA-approved, life-critical systems • Satellite-control software • Websites • Handheld software • Mobile phones • Network switching applications • CMMI Model applications • Some of the largest applications in use From: http://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com
  20. 20. 20 Companies adopting Agile And many more
  21. 21. 21 Critical 5 1. Agile Product Management is different! 2. Product Owner vs Product Manager 3. Making this work in an Enterprise 4. Common Pitfalls 5. Critical Success Factors
  22. 22. 22 Product Owner Owner of project vision Represents the customer picture by Official Star Wars Blog
  23. 23. 23 Product Manager Customer/ Market ExternalInternal Product Management Interlock 23 Steering teams Executives Engineering Marketing Sales Architects Project Mgr Support SEs And more.. Partners Analysts Thought leaders Channel Sales Agencies Suppliers And more.. Finding compelling, competitive and profitable solutions to market problems
  24. 24. 24 Product owner Agile teams External Product Manager Product Owner Interlock 24 Steering teams Executives Engineering Marketing Sales Panel of Customers & Prospects Partners Thought leaders Translate identified market problems into actionable, acceptable solutions while owning the product planning process
  25. 25. 25 Product Owner vs Product Manager Executives Development Mktg & Sales + Markets & Customers Product Management Budgets, staff, targets Strategy, forecasts, commitments, roadmaps, competitive intelligence Market information, MRD, priorities, roadmaps, requirements, personas, user stories…. Segmentation, messages, benefits/features, pricing, qualification, demos…. Field inputs, Market feedback Product Manager
  26. 26. 26 Scrum ROLES Summary Activity Owner Responsibility Manage the vision Product Owner Establish, nurture, and communicates the product vision. Achieve initial and on-going funding for the project through initial release plans and the initial Product Backlog. Manage the ROI Product Owner Monitor the project against its ROI goals and an investment vision. Update and prioritize the Product Backlog to ensure that the most valuable functionality is produced first and built upon. Manage the Iteration Team Collectively, select and develop the highest priority features on the Product Backlog during an iteration. Manage its own work and self-organize around how it desires to complete the iteration to meets its commitments. Manage the process Scrum Master Facilitator Champions the need of the team to the organization Prioritizes and removes obstacles Shields team from interference Manage the release Product Owner Make decisions about when to create an official release to maximize the goals established for the project.
  27. 27. 27 Balancing Roadmap • Building stuff in small compartments does not mean we release. • They should be in “Potential Shippable” stage • Customers might not be ready to consume so much new stuff so fast Internal External
  28. 28. 28 Prioritization Methods 1. Risk Based 2. Kano Analysis 3. MoSCow 4. Effort Based 5. ROI
  29. 29. 29 Scope & Sizing Be deliberate about scope & keep it small 1. It’s easy to try to do too much 2. Strategy = deciding what you’re NOT doing 3. Break features down into smaller chunks 4. Smaller scope →faster iterations →better Relative Sizing • T-Shirt sizes • Fibonacci series Source: mountaingoat
  30. 30. 30 A Balanced Backlog • IndependentI • NegotiableN • ValuableV • Estimate-ableE • Sized-appropriatelyS • TestableT
  31. 31. 31 The product owner plans the product in layers © 2006-2007 Jeff Patton, All rights reserved,
  32. 32. 32 The product owner plans the product in layers © 2006-2007 Jeff Patton, All rights reserved, www.agileproductdesign.com Product or Project What business objectives will the product fulfill? Product Charter Elevator Pitch Release How can we release value incrementally? What subset of business objectives will each release achieve? What user constituencies will the release serve? What general capabilities (big stories) will the release offer? Release plan Iteration What specifically will we build? (user stories) How will this iteration move us toward release objectives? Iteration Plan Story (Backlog Item) What user or stakeholder need will the story serve? How will it specifically look and behave? How will I determine if it’s completed? Story Details Acceptance Tests
  33. 33. 33 The Planning Onion can grow to include product portfolios and business strategy © 2006-2007 Jeff Patton, All rights reserved, www.agileproductdesign.com Product or Project What business objectives will the product fulfill? Product Charter Elevator Pitch Release How can we release value incrementally? What subset of business objectives will each release achieve? What user constituencies will the release serve? What general capabilities (big stories) will the release offer? Release plan Iteration What specifically will we build? (user stories) How will this iteration move us toward release objectives? Iteration Plan Story (Backlog Item) What user or stakeholder need will the story serve? How will it specifically look and behave? How will I determine if it’s completed? Story Details Acceptance Tests Product or Project Release Iteration Story
  34. 34. 34 The Planning Onion can grow to include product portfolios and business strategy © 2006-2007 Jeff Patton, All rights reserved, www.agileproductdesign.com Product or Project Release Iteration Story
  35. 35. 35 The Planning Onion can grow to include product portfolios and business strategy Product or Project Release Iteration Story Product Portfolio Business Strategy © 2006-2007 Jeff Patton, All rights reserved, www.agileproductdesign.com Daily by team member Bi-weekly by team Quarterly by PO and Team Bi Yearly by PO Yearly by PO
  36. 36. 36 Critical 5 1. Agile Product Management is different! 2. Product Owner vs Product Manager 3. Making this work in an Enterprise 4. Common Pitfalls 5. Critical Success Factors
  37. 37. 37 Scaling Product Management • Product Management Organization GM – VP PM – VP Engg/CTO Product Management Organization Product Owners More market-focused More technical
  38. 38. 38Source: good agile
  39. 39. 39Source: good agile
  40. 40. 40Source: good agile
  41. 41. 41Source: good agile
  42. 42. 42Source: good agile
  43. 43. 43 Critical 5 1. Agile Product Management is different! 2. Product Owner vs Product Manager 3. Making this work in an Enterprise 4. Common Pitfalls 5. Critical Success Factors
  44. 44. 44 Common Pitfalls – PO + Agile Team 5pitfalls 1. Part time, not fully engaged with the team 2. Lack of detail on stories, acceptance tests 3. Stale items in backlog 4. Unable to get the best of the team 5. Multiple Backlogs maintained
  45. 45. 45
  46. 46. 46 Critical 5 1. Agile Product Management is different! 2. Product Owner vs Product Manager 3. Making this work in an Enterprise 4. Common Pitfalls 5. Critical Success Factors
  47. 47. 47 Critical 5 1. Listen and Listen Well 2. Ruthless Prioritization (Consistency is key) 3. Summarize and share customer interactions (incl ROI and Rev.) 4. Measure your progress make it VISIBLE!
  48. 48. 48 5. MANAGE YOUR TIME! "You must have long term goals to keep you from being frustrated by short term failures ". -- Charles C. Noble
  49. 49. 49 Q &A
  50. 50. 50 bimlesh@aguaisolutions.com Follow me on Twitter @bimleshgundurao

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