Lecture9

218
-1

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
218
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lecture9

  1. 1. TCPTransmission Control Protocol
  2. 2. Simple Demultiplexor (UDP) Unreliable and unordered datagram service Adds multiplexing No flow control Endpoints identified by ports servers have well-known ports see /etc/services on Unix 0 SrcPort 16 DstPort 31 Header format Length Checksum Data Optional checksum psuedo header + UDP header + data
  3. 3. TCP OverviewConnection- Full duplexoriented Flow control: keepByte-stream sender from app writes bytes overrunning receiver TCP sends Congestion control: segments keep sender from app reads bytes overrunning network Application process Application process Write Read bytes bytes TCP TCP Send buffer Receive buffer Segment Segment ■ ■ ■ Segment Transmit segments
  4. 4. TCP Header 0 4 10 16 31 SrcPort DstPort SequenceNum Acknowledgment HdrLen 0 Flags AdvertisedWindow Checksum UrgPtr Options (variable) Data• Flags: SYN, FIN, RESET, PUSH, URG, ACK• Checksum: IP pseudo header + TCP header + data
  5. 5. TCP Overview When a client requests a connection, it sends a “SYN” segment (a special TCP segment) to the server port. SYN stands for synchronize. The SYN message includes the client’s ISN. ISN is Initial Sequence Number.
  6. 6. TCP Overview (Contd.)Every TCP segment includes a SequenceNumber that refers to the first byte of dataincluded in the segment.Every TCP segment includesAcknowledgement Number that indicatesthe byte number of the next data that isexpected to be received. All bytes up through this number have already been received.
  7. 7. TCP Overview (Contd.) MSS: Maximum segment size (A TCP option) Window: Every ACK includes a Window field that tells the sender how many bytes it can send before the receiver will have to toss it away (due to fixed buffer size).
  8. 8. Three-Way Handshake
  9. 9. TCP Connection EstablishmentStep 1: Client Starts A client starts by sending a SYN segment with the following information: Client’s ISN (generated pseudo-randomly) Maximum Receive Window for client. Optionally (but usually) MSS (largest datagram accepted). No payload! (Only TCP headers)
  10. 10. TCP Connection EstablishmentStep 2: Sever Response When a waiting server sees a new connection request, the server sends back a SYN segment with: Server’s ISN (generated pseudo-randomly) Request Number is Client ISN+1 Maximum Receive Window for server. Optionally (but usually) MSS No payload! (Only TCP headers)
  11. 11. TCP Connection EstablishmentStep 3: When the Server’s SYN is received, the client sends back an ACK with: Request Number is Server’s ISN+1
  12. 12. TCP Data Transfer Once the connection is established, data can be sent. Each data segment includes a sequence number identifying the first byte in the segment. Each segment (data or empty) includes an acknowledgement Number indicating what data has been received.
  13. 13. Buffering Keep in mind that TCP is part of the Operating System. It takes care of all these details. The TCP layer doesn’t know when the application will ask for any received data. TCP buffers incoming data so it’s ready when we ask for it.
  14. 14. TCP Buffers Both the client and server allocate buffers to hold incoming and outgoing data The TCP layer does this. Both the client and server announce how much buffer space remains (the Window field in a TCP segment).
  15. 15. Send Buffers The application gives the TCP layer some data to send. The data is put in a send buffer, where it stays until the data is ACK’d. it has to stay, as it might need to be sent again! The TCP layer won’t accept data from the application unless (or until) there is buffer space.
  16. 16. ACKsA receiver doesn’t have to ACK everysegment (it can ACK many segments witha single ACK segment).Each ACK can also contain outgoing data(piggybacking).If a sender doesn’t get an ACK after sometime limit (MSL) it resends the data.
  17. 17. TCP Segment Order Most TCP implementations will accept out-of- order segments (if there is room in the buffer). Once the missing segments arrive, a single ACK can be sent for the whole thing. Remember: IP delivers TCP segments, and IP in not reliable - IP datagrams can be lost or arrive out of order.
  18. 18. TCP Connection Termination The TCP layer can send a RST segment that terminates a connection if something is wrong. Usually the application tells TCP to terminate the connection politely with a FIN segment.
  19. 19. FIN Either end of the connection can initiate termination. A FIN is sent, which means the application is done sending data. The FIN is ACK’d. The other end must now send a FIN. That FIN must be ACK’d.
  20. 20. App1 App2 FIN FIN SN=X SN=X ACK=X+1 ACK=X+1 ... FIN FIN SN=Y SN=Y ACK=Y+1 ACK=Y+1
  21. 21. State Transition Diagram Client Server CLOSED CLOSED Active open /SYN Active open /SYN Passive open Close Passive open Close Close Close LISTEN LISTEN SYN/SYN + ACK Send/SYN SYN/SYN + ACK Send /SYN SYN/SYN + ACK SYN_RCVD SYN_SENT SYN/SYN + ACKSYN_RCVD SYN_SENT ACK SYN + ACK/ACK ACK SYN + ACK/ACK Close/FIN ESTABLISHED Close/FIN ESTABLISHED Close/FIN FIN/ACK FIN_WAIT_1 CLOSE_WAIT Close/FIN FIN/ACK AC FIN/ACK ACK K Close/FINFIN_WAIT_1 + CLOSE_WAIT FI N/ AC FIN/ACK FIN_WAIT_2 AC CLOSING LAST_ACK ACK K Close/FIN K + FI ACK Timeout after two ACK N segment lifetimesFIN_WAIT_2 /A CLOSING LAST_ACK FIN/ACK C TIME_WAIT CLOSED K ACK Timeout after two ACK segment lifetimes FIN/ACK TIME_WAIT CLOSED
  22. 22. TCP TIME_WAIT Once a TCP connection has been terminated (the last ACK sent) there is some unfinished business: What if the ACK is lost? The last FIN will be resent and it must be ACK’d. What if there are lost or duplicated segments that finally reach the destination after a long delay? TCP hangs out for a while (2 * Max. Segment Life) to handle these situations.
  23. 23. Checking TCP states with netstat$ netstat -a -nActive Connections Proto Local Address Foreign Address State TCP 0.0.0.0:7 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:9 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:13 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:17 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:19 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:21 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:23 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:25 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:80 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:135 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:443 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 0.0.0.0:445 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 127.0.0.1:1030 127.0.0.1:7161 ESTABLISHED TCP 127.0.0.1:1051 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 127.0.0.1:7161 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 127.0.0.1:7161 127.0.0.1:1030 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:139 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING TCP 141.218.143.76:1836 141.218.143.43:445 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:2003 66.250.84.31:80 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:2136 141.218.143.215:22 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:3355 216.155.193.166:5050 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:3844 141.218.143.10:143 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:4635 141.218.143.46:80 ESTABLISHED TCP 141.218.143.76:4683 141.218.143.10:143 ESTABLISHED
  24. 24. References Cisco Networking Academy Program (CCNA), Cisco Press. CSCI-5273 : Computer Networks, Dirk Grunwald, University of Colorado-Boulder CSCI-4220: Network Programming, Dave Hollinger, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1, Stevens. Java Network Programming and Distributed Computing, Reilly & Reilly. Computer Networks: A Systems Approach, Peterson & Davie. http://www.firewall.cx http://www.javasoft.com
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×