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Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
Effortless Passenger Identification System
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Effortless Passenger Identification System

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This presentation discussed the first stage of findings from the Effortless Passenger Identification System project. It highlights field tests using RFID technology in both Los Angeles, CA and Fargo, …

This presentation discussed the first stage of findings from the Effortless Passenger Identification System project. It highlights field tests using RFID technology in both Los Angeles, CA and Fargo, ND. Controlled testing was also conducted in Fargo using a Paratransit vehicle. Consumer acceptance techniques using a combination of focus groups and surveys designed to gain a greater understanding of user attitudes regarding RFID and its applications were also evaluated.

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  • 1. Effortless Passenger Identification System DEL PETERSON ASSOCIATE RESEARCH FELLOW SMALL URBAN & RURAL TRANSIT CENTER FARGO, NDTRB’S 20TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RURAL PUBLIC AND INTERCITY BUS TRANSPORTATION OCTOBER 15, 2012
  • 2. Summary of Concept Evaluate feasibility of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to track transit passengers Technical Operational Economic
  • 3. Application Contactless fare media Standard requires cards to come within a few inches of a reader Stores personal info and fare value Can be costly and unnecessary
  • 4. Summary of Concept RFID tags can be read at longer distances than contactless or proximity cards Already used in pupil transportation Expected to see widespread adoption in specialty markets
  • 5. Application Examples where EPIS can work • Riders with physical or mental disabilities • Riders using transit fare free, university students • Contracted service for riders who do not pay fares, but accounting still required
  • 6. Application EPIS functionality • Limited data storage • Stores passenger ID code • Time and location info can be collected • Used for planning, reporting and billing
  • 7. Investigative Approach RFID RFID Tag Reader Host RFID air interface RFID reader interface Alien Technology ALR 9900+ readerAlien RFID tags: ALN-9634 ALN-9630 ALN-9654
  • 8. Controlled Testing MATBUS and Vocational Training Center (VTC)  Six volunteers boarded and alighted under different scenarios
  • 9. Controlled Testing Used paratransit, cutaway bus  Controlled testing results Successful Scenario Reads Boarding the bus while holding the RFID cards 6 of 6 Boarding the bus with the RFID cards in pockets 2 of 6 Boarding the bus while holding cell phones and RFID cards 1 of 6 Boarding the bus while holding keys and RFID cards 6 of 6 Boarding the bus while holding cell phones and keys and RFID cards 3 of 6 Boarding the bus while having some riders stand near the back antenna 6 of 6 Wheelchair rider boards holding an RFID card 1 of 1 Boarding wheelchair with RFID attached to the frame 1 of 1
  • 10. Investigative Approach Field Testing  Foothill Transit, Los Angeles, CA  MATBUS, Fargo, ND  Recruited students at Rio Hondo College and North Dakota State University to carry RFID cards  Recruitment via email  RFID cards distributed at student unions  Required to keep travel log and take survey  $25 gift card to campus bookstore for participating
  • 11. Field Testing Foothill Transit and Rio Hondo College  80 students enrolled via email in two days  50 available spots, so 30 put on waiting list  Many students didn’t know what was required  10-15 were unwilling to participate due to privacy issues  Used Zonar Systems RFID tracking system, ZPass  Traditionally used for school transportation  Unfortunately, Zonar no longer sells or supports medium range RFID Zpass units  Units installed were for proximity cards  No usable ridership data was collected
  • 12. Field Testing MATBUS and North Dakota State University  200 students enrolled via email in one day  First come, first serve approach for 50 cards  Tags distributed in two hours  No privacy concerns whatsoever  Used Alien Technology reader, antennas, and tags  Placed one antenna near the front door and one near the back door  Laminated tags were attached to school bags  Reader recorded tag ID number, time, and number of reads  22 of possible 25 reads recorded successfully
  • 13. Customer Acceptance Disabled adult riders Parents of elementary age students University students (Rio Hondo and NDSU)  Focus groups and surveys  14 parents surveyed  59 students surveyed (15 at Rio Hondo and 44 at NDSU)  5 person disabled rider focus group
  • 14. Disabled Riders Riders felt technology was useful and easy to use Cognitive abilities limited questioning VTC supervisors felt technology showed merit They believed that if RFID tag could be kept in a riders pocket or wallet it would be more effective Risk of loss or damage to tag attached to purse or clothing would be too great
  • 15. Parents of Elementary Age Children Contacted via email and completed survey online Respondents employees of West Fargo school district  Most felt technology would increase safety for students  Most would have child use technology if available  Two respondents believed technology not necessary  Would result in “hovering” over children too much  One parent had concerns about contracted bus service  Need strict regulations as to who could see what information
  • 16. University Students Completed survey as part of requirement for $25 gift card The RFID card was easy to use 80% 60% Percentage 40% 20% 0% Strongly Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Disagree Agree Initially, I worried about privacy issues with the use of RFID cards 40% 30% Percentage 20% 10% 0% Strongly Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Disagree Agree
  • 17. University StudentsRFID cards would reduce boarding times andkeep buses running on time 50% Percentage 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree I would use the RFID card regularly if it was available 50% 40% 30% Percentage 20% 10% 0% Strongly Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Disagree Agree
  • 18. University Students General Comments  Someone could cutoff tag without me knowing  If the card could be read without being shown it would be more effective  Others felt card was in the way while attached to backpack  Worried about multiple reads when someone would get off bus near back door to let someone else board  Overall, students felt technology was efficient and more convenient than having to show their student ID card
  • 19. Summary and Key Findings Controlled testing indicated the reader received a valid signal when the card was in plain sight with no interference present Medium-range reader used at NDSU was nearly 90 percent effective Consumer acceptance groups believed technology showed merit Many felt card kept in wallet or pocket would be more efficient for riders Most felt technology would reduce boarding times and keeps buses running on schedule Multiple reads when riders get too close to antennas and interference from clothing, cell phones, etc. are main issues
  • 20. Thank You Del Peterson Del PetersonAssociate Research Fellow / Small Urban & Rural Transit Center Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY Dept. 2880, PO Box 6050 / Fargo, ND 58108-6050 Ph: 701.231.5908 / Fax: 701.231.1945 www.ndsu.edu / www.surtc.org Del.Peterson@ndsu.edu

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