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TPMA Focus Newsletter - Issue 10 (3Q2012)
 

TPMA Focus Newsletter - Issue 10 (3Q2012)

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    TPMA Focus Newsletter - Issue 10 (3Q2012) TPMA Focus Newsletter - Issue 10 (3Q2012) Document Transcript

    • TPMA Toronto Product Management Association FOCUS Issue #10: 3Q 2012 What is the TPMA?"Creating Insight through O Shared Knowledge" NT pFounded in March 2001, ROthe Toronto Product Man-agement Association is am TOa non-profit organizationformed to create an en-vironment that facilitateslearning, mentoring, & net-working opportunities. tcVisit: www.TPMA.ca KEY DATES:ProductCamp Toronto uc- Sat, Jul 28th 9:00am- Rogers School of Mgt od- 55 Dundas St. W.Manage Your PM Career- Tue, Sep 25th 6:15pm- Metro Hall, 55 John St. prLean Startups in T.O.- Tue, Oct 30th 6:15pm- Metro Hall, 55 John St. THIS EDITION:Snapshot 2ProductCamp Photos 3Mobile Design 5Crowd Wisdom 7Wild Apricot Power 8News: Macadamian 8TPMA Social Photos 9Inside Product Mgt 10LinkedIn Stats 11CoolTools 12
    • SNAPSHOT President’s Awards for 2012 T o introduce the TPMA “2012 Presi- dent’s Award,” it was a great honour to present it to two enormously deserv- ing, and long standing executives of the association. Our two recipients being Al-T hank you, my fellow members of the TPMA. This season has grown to bememorable, from powerful new topics to lan Neil and Lee Garrison. Allan Neil, stepped up to the plate thisa well deserved social-networking break. year to volunteer as an executive, after many years of dedicated service. AllanToronto ProductCamp is upon us again, thought up, and took the action of re-and I look forward to learning from col- cording TPMA meetings. This started asleagues across various industries. In an audio recording, then grew to the oc- Lee Garrison (right) receives 2012 Presi-this extended edition you will find photos casional video recording, and has now dent’s Award from Charles Dimov (left)from Toronto ProductCamps 2010 and become an audio / video podcast for the2011. It is particularly exciting to have TPMA. More on TPMA podcasting in a contribute his creativity, and energy toSteve Johnson opening this year’s Pro- future article. our regular monthly meeting schedule.ductCamp, as the Keynote speaker. Simply put, we could not have pulled off Beyond the recordings, this year had us such a smooth migration without Allan’sIt gives me great pleasure to welcome take on the challenge of updating our skill, hard work and sheer determination.OneDesk, WildApricot and Macadamian web hosting platform to provide some- as our newest sponsors of both the much needed functionality. Superficially, Lee Garrison, also received the Presi-TPMA and of Toronto ProductCamp. this may seem straight-forward. How- dent’s Award for his years of work with ever, the reality is that it takes an enor- the TPMA in various functions, includingIn this edition of TPMA Focus, you will mous amount of analysis, investigation, having been our long standing presidentalso find interesting tips on the 4 mind- and labour - to migrate to a new platform for several years. This year, Lee tooksets of mobile design, a view inside seamlessly. With Eli Alston’s help, Al- a supporting role as Secretary of theProduct Management at SpeechBobble, lan took on this challenge, head-on. In TPMA. His passion for the TPMA andand photos from the Summer Social. little over two months, the TPMA was the good it does for the Product Manage- smoothly transitioned onto a new host- ment community - has been inspiring.Most importantly - thanks to the vol- ing platform, designed for non-profit or-unteers and executive volunteers who ganisations like ours. Behind the scene, Lee’s efforts this yearhave given freely of their time, to keep have kept the team on schedule, consis-our programs and association humming. Allan pulled this off, while continuing to tent and driving in the right direction.As always, your efforts are needed anddearly appreciated. Thank you! Beyond all his effort at the TPMA, Lee has been one of the initiators and the or-I hope to meet you at ProductCamp. Be- ganising force behind Toronto Product-yond learning in this grass-roots, FREE Camp. This alone takes a huge amountun-conference; remember to network, of co-ordination, effort, dedication, andmeet new friends, and most of all - enjoy time. All of which Lee has contributed,the experience! year after year, without question.See you there! Gentlemen, thank you for your help, self- less dedication and service in keeping our TPMA running smoothly. Charles Dimov Allan Neil (right) receiving 2012 Presi- Charles Dimov TPMA President dent’s Award from Charles Dimov (left)
    • TPMA
    • Toronto ProductCamp All photographs are from Toronto ProductCamp 2011 and 2010. Event Photographers: Michael Campbell Denise CharlesworthTPMA
    • 4 Mindsets of Mobile Product DesignW ith the recent popularity of smart phones and tablets, software prod-uct managers are under pressure to cre- work together and follow these time-test- ed user research techniques: A mobile version with extraneous func- tionality will force users to sift through unnecessary data. To help users get theate mobile versions of their products for most value in the least time, keep the • Contextual Interviews and Fo-the iPhone, iPad, and Android devices. denominator of the equation as small cus Groups uncover actual as possible by focusing on their context- needs and opinions and can beToday’s mobile users bring high expec- specific, immediate needs. done either in person, on thetations to the table. In a 2010 study by phone or through surveys.eMarketer, 73% of users indicated a Environment influences interactioncompany’s mobile software should be • Task Analyses break down all Users may interact differently with a mo-easier to use than its desktop or web the steps a user takes to fulfill bile product than they do with a desktopproduct. And 69% said their percep- his or her goals. or web version. In an office setting, fortion of the company’s brand would be • Field Research offers insight example, a user has the time and thenegatively affected if the mobile version into the way users would inter- ability to perform data entry. This samewasn’t easy to use. In an increasingly act with your mobile product in user would likely not want to do this oncrowded mobile market, an application the real world. a small touchscreen while waiting in anthat immediately captures the user’s airport lounge.attention, is easy to navigate, and of- • Usability testing follows a for-fers real value is critical to market suc- mal usability protocol, to iden- tify and correct any gaps be- In the case of a mobile product for busi-cess. From our experience with helping ness use, there may also be regulatoryproduct managers design and develop tween users’ goals and the actual experience your product or legal constraints to be taken into con-mobile apps, there are four important sideration. In a hospital setting, for ex-principles for successfully meeting and is delivering today. ample, it may be appropriate to storeexceeding these criteria. sensitive patient information on a secure These, and other user research meth- odologies described at macadamian. desktop computer, but illegal to houseMindset One: Don’t Port — Create it on a smartphone that could leave the com provide product managers with theBrian Fling, author of the book Mobile insight they need to envision, and create hospital, and easily fall into the wrongDesign & Development, advises: “Cre- a mobile product, not simply port an ex- hands.ate a product, don’t reimagine one for isting desktop or web service.small screens. Great mobile products Design for partial attention and inter-are created, never ported.” ruption Mindset Two: Understand the User’s Context Mobile device users are frequently inter-Focus on the most important tasks and rupted mid-task, either by a device re-user goals Because a mobile device can be used lated interruption (such as an incomingIn general, a successful mobile prod- anywhere, your application’s design call or a lost network connection) or anuct offers only a fraction of the features should be able to suit a variety of envi- environmental distraction. A good designand capabilities offered by its equivalent ronmental, organizational, and personal will accommodate these interruptions bydesktop or web version. These capabili- contexts. For example, think of the dif- including shortcuts that allow for simpleties could be a subset of existing desk- ference between a Travelocity user at and efficient multitasking. iPhones fortop features, a set of new features that home planning a vacation, and a Trav- example, make it easy to switch betweenbetter address a mobile user’s needs, or elocity user running through an airport a phone call and an application.a combination of the two. Only the most looking to confirm a connection time on arelevant and important features should smart phone. Mobile users want to com- When designing your product, be surebe included in a mobile version of an ex- plete their tasks quickly, and can easily to identify the most common forms ofisting product — all other features should become frustrated if a mobile product interruption and include graphical dis-either be discarded entirely, or moved to doesn’t work as expected, or is slow to plays that simplify context switching andsecondary screens. perform. multitasking. Be sure to also help users understand where they are at all times,To determine what’s important to users The value-for-effort equation where they can go, and how they canin a mobile context, you study their be- When evaluating the efficiency of your ‘get back’.havior in order to discover their needs, mobile design, use the following formula:goals, workflow, and workplace process- Point to priority informationes. We recommend Product Managers VALUE = Ability to fulfill an immediate To ensure hurried or interrupted usersand User Experience (UX) Designers need /the time required to accomplish TPMA the task (continued on page 6)
    • 4 Mobile Design Mindsets (from pg 5) The primary real estate of each screen should relate directly to the task in ques-don’t become lost, it’s also important Mindset Three: ‘Surface’ Informa- tion.to provide easy access to the most fre- tion Quicklyquently accessed features and infor- Provide hints and clear feedback for As the saying goes, you only have one every actionmation. Once you have identified what chance to make a first impression. Thisthese are (through usability testing, de- Some actions on a mobile device — is especially true in the mobile worldscribed earlier), ensure they are easily such as downloading an update — take where users have an array of apps toaccessible from any screen. This can be longer than others. Ensure your UI offers choose from. In the competitive appdone via prominent buttons or icons. feedback and progress updates on ac- market, value must be apparent imme- tions that take more than a few seconds. diately and easy to access, so users canAvoid or limit free-text entry when- On Android, for example, you can quick- accomplish their desired tasks.ever possible ly see the status of apps being updated.Just like mobile screens, mobile key- With a limited screen size, it isn’t pos-boards are small and not well suited to One way to provide quick access to ad- sible for an application to display alldata entry. Research the most common ditional information is to use dashboards areas of interest to users at once, andtasks that will be performed by your us- and ‘push’ notifications to reveal higher- they won’t have the patience to searchers, and then design pre-defined lists, level information. through dozens of screens for informa-auto-complete forms and/or suggested tion. You need to design an interface thattext to speed and simplify their interac- Be predictable quickly brings relevant information to thetions. surface. You can also surface information quickly by leveraging the user’s familiarity withBy understanding your user’s context Rule of thumb — one task per screen existing visual cues. For example, a mo-and tailoring your UI to support it, you bile user won’t want to hunt for the Close Because it can be difficult or time con-will reduce the risk that your applica- or Next button, so it should be in a pre- suming to scroll, pinch, zoom-in, or clicktion will confuse or frustrate customers. dictable location. links on a small screen, it’s importantUsers who can access critical informa- to create individual, focused screenstion in seconds, and resume their tasks As the mobile device market has ma- for each task you’ve identified throughquickly, will be more likely to view your tured, many visual attributes have be- user research. While a screen can ex-mobile product as a trusted resource at come standardized across platforms and pose multiple tasks, it should help thework, home, and on the move. operating systems. The battery indicator user complete only one task at a time. on smart phones, for example, is al- most always found at the very top of the screen. Soft keys that perform similar functions like Back and Forward should always appear in the same position from screen to screen. Mindset Four: Recognize the Per- sonal Nature of a Mobile Device A mobile device clearly differs from a desktop or laptop in size, but it’s also viewed by users as a more ‘personal’ device. • A smartphone is always on your person because it’s small enough to travel with you ev- erywhere. • It’s always on in the sense that it’s always connected to the In- ternet/network and can notify you immediately of a new mes- sage, tweet, or status update. TPMA (continued on page 7)
    • 4 Mobile Design Mindsets (from pg 6) Wisdom from the Crowd • It is the most social commodity An intuitive UI that acknowledges the Quotes directly from YOU we own, allowing us to commu- personal nature of the mobile device nicate with friends, colleagues, and strangers via voice, text, and anticipates user intent can mean the difference between an app that collects Q uestion: What is your MOST im- portant lesson in Product Man- agement? videos, and imagery. dust, and one that becomes part of your customer’s daily routine.If your application is one you foresee us-ers using multiple times a day, it’s a good Mobile UI design best practices "Always make sure you are in a situationidea to provide the ability to save pref- to get lots of feedback quickly so you can When designing a mobile product, thereerences, and automatically “remember” learn. Works for your career and your is almost never a need for a one-to-onerecent entries. products." relationship between its capabilities and --- Charlie Trainor the desktop product. User needs differAllow users to easily control notifica- greatly from one platform to another be-tions and alerts cause a user’s goal on a tablet or smart- "Dedicate an appropriate amount of timeUsers also expect the ability to personal- phone can be quite different from his or to providing the voice of the customer toize aspects of your application. A good her goal at a desktop. For this reason, product development teams."design will allow them to: you must always create a mobile product --- Peter Cop — and not just ‘port’ it from an existing • Modify the alert notification solution. (whether it is a sound or a vi- bration) “Product Management is a difficult By understanding the context in which • Easily turn off alerts job, with many paradoxes to juggle, the device will be used, obtaining a deep teams wanting your decision and bless- • Quickly respond to the alert di- and objective understanding of your us- ing, and times of enormous pressure. rectly from the alert screen ers’ needs, and tailoring your design Learn to meditate!” to meet user goals, you can success- --- Charles DimovAnticipate user intent fully translate an existing product into a streamlined mobile application that isToday’s mobile users expect their smart- intuitive, quickly adopted by users and,phone or tablet to be ‘smart’. So you “Start with Why.” in turn, successful in the crowded mobileshould design your product to recognize --- Aldwin Neekon marketplace.input already provided and focus thenext set of choices accordingly. If, forexample, your usability tests show us- "If its not working - give up! Try some-ers almost always wish to perform task thing else - dont feel like you have to‘B’ upon completion of task ;A’, ensure About the Author continue because of prior investment."your design shepherds users directly to Scott Plewes is an expert in user experi- --- Corina Stoddard‘B’ from ‘A’. ence design, user research, and incorpo- rating the voice of theWindows Phone 7 does a good job of customer into prod- "The most important opinion comes fromanticipating user intent by displaying the uct design. As Vice consumers, not product mgrs."keyboard most appropriate for the form President of User --- Leslie Nicholsonbeing completed. iPhone and Android Experience Designare also good at accommodating activity. at Maca-When the user is on a call, for example, damian,the screen turns black. As soon as the Scott hasphone is pulled away from the ear, the 20 years of experience design-screen re-appears because it ‘knows’ the ing across the spectrum - fromuser will probably want to perform anoth- desktop, web, and mobile ex-er activity. Because the device is close to perience design through tothe user at all times, applications can be command line and telepho-used multiple times throughout the day. ny design. Contact Scott atThe most useful and efficient quickly be- scott@macadamian.com andcome part of a user’s lifestyle, while the view more detailed presenta-rest are discarded. tions: www.macadamian.com. TPMA
    • Wild Apricot Powers Web TPMA Welcomes Macadamian as a Corporate Sponsor! T PMA welcomes Macadamian as our latest Corporate Sponsor, supporting the product management community, professional development, and network- ing across the Greater Toronto Area. Macadamian is a global leader in soft- ware product creation providing a com- plete range of product strategy, user experience design and software engi- neering services to clients around the world, including industry leaders like BitTorrent, Telus, Juniper, RIM and Mi- crosoft. For established and emerging technologies and platforms, Macadami- an has a track record of helping clientsN oticed anything different about www. tpma.ca lately? You may have ob-served a slightly different look and layout ties which we will be rolling out in the future such as electronic payments (Visa, PayPal, etc) for create successful products on a com- plete range of desktop, web and mobile platforms.to the site. Or maybe you didn’t notice meetings and membershipsanything at all - which is good. This partnership is a great opportunity to Your Feedback and Ideas Please... strengthen a relationship between twoIn May we migrated www.tpma.ca to a organisations which are both committednew platform from one of the TPMA’s Do you have feedback regarding the new to helping product managers improvenew sponsors, Wild Apricot. With many web site, ideas for how we can improve their effectiveness at bringing creativethanks and much appreciation to Vault the tpma.ca web site and/or improve our new products to market.Solutions, who hosted our site for most on-line TPMA presence? Please provideof the past 10 years, we decided that us your feedback using our Feedback Not only will Macadamian sponsor theto better serve the fast-growing TPMA form at http://www.tpma.ca/feedback or TPMA; they are also sponsoring To-community we needed to transition to a sending an email to webmaster@tpma. ronto ProductCamp 2012 - taking placeproduct/platform designed to support the ca. We look forward to hearing from you. on Saturday July 28th, at the Rogersunique needs of volunteer associations And stay tuned for more updates as we School of Management.like the TPMA. continue to evolve the web site to serve you better! Visit: www.macadamian.comWhat’s In It For Me (community)? • Better Record Keeping - More robust contact/member frame- . TPMA Mentoring work which makes it easier for Program - Take II you to sign-up and easier for us Engage in your Profession as a Mentor / Mentee to identify you for meeting regis- trations, etc. Last year TPMA’s first mentoring season started. With a huge response we quickly ran out of mentors. Those who • Improved Communication - Eas- were teamed-up, are still going strong. ier for leaders and volunteers to send out targeted email commu- In Nov 2012 we will be at it again. Mentors, nication and easier for contacts/ share your wealth of experience, and sign members to control their own up today. Mentee’s, learn from those who subscriptions to updates like up- have been there, and succeeded. coming meetings, newsletters, blogs, etc. Title email: Mentoring • Additional Capabilities - The Send to: mentorship@tpma.ca Wild Apricot platform also pro- NOTE: NOT a Job Referral Service! TPMA vides us with additional capabili-
    • TPMA Social 2012 TPMA Summer Social Photographs are from TPMA Social or Milano Bar sur- roundings: 26Jun2012. Event Photographers: Calum Tsang + Anonymous TPMA
    • Inside Product Management: SpeechBobbleInside Product Management is a new other content. Few provide any further end. The difficulty then becomes anseries, asking PMs in different firms and data than: a) what is being said, and b) issue of understanding the commonindustries to describe their role, respon- the name of the individual saying it. requirements that exist between indus-sibilities, functions, and profession. tries. We avoid customization by provid- Social networks virtualize relationships ing a series of interchangeable featuresE veryone is familiar with the concept of social networks such as Face-book, or Twitter. These names have and the discussions they generate. When I post to Facebook, I know every- thing about the person I’m posting to, that different clients can select, while still benefitting from the main platform func- tions common to all.become part of our daily interaction with and their connections. I know that oth-friends and family, and they provide a ers who read my post will also know the The result is that Speechbobble are busi-dashboard of essential information. same about me, and can engage in the ness experts. We understand and pro- conversation based on that knowledge. vide the tools that you need to manageTraditional electronic communication Information is presented with context. projects, share documents, communi-(like email, forums, or even instant mes- cate strategically, and locate the subjectsenger) packages content as stand- My product, Speechbobble, an Enter- matter experts within your organization.alone items. An email thread is orga- prise Social Network, replicates the ben-nized into a hierarchy of documents or efit of social networks in the context of As Head of Product Development, Ifiles separate from other emails. Instant the workplace. We support conversation identify these requirements, then designchat creates temporary conversations, and provide value to organizations with and prioritize the development of theperfect for immediate communication. defined goals. One of our main chal- features that address them. This may beForums provide single streams of con- lenges lies in repurposing a style of com- my favorite aspect of the job. It gives meversation, with no relevance to the great- munication designed for casual interac- the opportunity to understand businesser community. tions into something productive. processes unique to a variety of indus- tries. I am constantly refining my over-In reality, the above examples of com- To this end, we virtualize common busi- all understanding of business, providingmunication are best used for delivering ness processes. Our delivery model re- solutions to problems consistent acrossindependent content. They’re not op- lies on our platform’s success in meeting industry verticals.timized for delivering information with the needs of most businesses, withoutcontext because of its relationship with requiring further customization on our However, designing and implementing product features is only part of what I do. Other responsibilities that are equally important to my role are: platform inte- gration strategy; user experience de- sign; and analytical evaluation. Again, we avoid customized feature de- velopment for individual deployments. Should a client request a unique feature, I must determine the value of building the custom feature versus finding and incorporating another product’s solution. Specific examples may include provi- sioning our platform with ecommerce ca- pabilities, or enabling single sign-on with other products. Driving factors for making these deci- sions usually depend on the frequency of requests for a particular function, the value a new feature adds to our existing feature suite, and whether or not it fits into our current roadmap. If these fac- tors don’t dictate a need to develop the new feature internally, I must determine the value that another product may pro- TPMA
    • vide, and whether it can be integratedwith ours. This aspect of my job expos- Join TPMA on LinkedIn?es me to other solution providers andexpands my knowledge of other marketspaces.Speechbobble’s features aren’t all thatdetermine the value of the platform.One of the most important reasons fora Speechbobble’s success is the experi-ence it provides to the end user. Likemost software, our product needs to en-courage use through intuitive platformdesign and an attractive interface. De-signing the overall user experience canbe a creative outlet, and is often the larg-est source of fun in my position.Unfortunately, inflexible organizations Sview social networks as redundant fea- ince inception the TPMA LinkedIn 30% of the participants are in Productture sets provided by existing tools. Group has grown steadily these Management, which should come as noWithout using the product, it’s difficult to years, hitting 700 members as of this surprise. The other prominent groups areunderstand its value unless you see the week (technically 699 as of this writing). then distributed across various functionsinherent weakness in those preexisting It is refreshing to that so many partici- listed as consulting, marketing, busi-tools. To combat this obstacle, we also pants are finding value in being part of ness development and sales. Again theprovide a tool that appeals to traditional the community. Above is the chart from interesting point here is the wide rangeviews of what is valuable: analytics. LinkedIn Group’s Statistics page show- of functions and broad opinions one can ing the gradual and very consistent harness from a group, like ours.Having started out as an Analyst, ana- growth of our discussion forum.lytics remain very important to me. Join the conversation. If you are not onSpeechbobble contains an analytics en- Interestingly, the first chart below show- the TPMA Group, then please subscribe.gine that converts the qualitative value ing the seniority of our LinkedIn Group If you are on, then do take a moment tothat can be derived from using an En- users, shows us that 46% of the mem- add your thoughts, opinions, or ques-terprise Social Network into quantifiable bership is in the Senior, or Director and tions to the forum. The group is here tometrics. Stakeholders who champion above management ranks. What a super help support our community of Productthe platform can then illustrate hard ROI group of senior brainpower and experi- and Marketing Managers. Posting con-through a variety of measurements. You ence to be part of your network. cepts, ideas or questions can help youcan easily determine statistics on ac- connect with like-minded, and some-cepted projects vs. proposed projects; Below to the right, is the second chart times divergent thinkers - who might justtime spent planning; response time to describing the function of the members benefit your business, career, or get youcrises; and reduced meeting hours. This of the TPMA LinkedIn Group. Naturally the answers you seek. See you online!capability is a source of pride as Head ofProduct, as it sells Speechbobble as alegitimate business tool.About the Author Lucan has been work- ing in IT Communica- tions and S/W for over 5 years. Previous roles included Analyst positions with the City of Toronto’sIT Portfolio Management group, andGuestLogix Inc, an airline payment solu- TPMAtions provider.
    • COOLTOOLS: ZOOM H2 recording both small room inter- views and meetings as well asA s Product Managers we are regular- ly required to capture, review, ana-lyze, distill and share a lot of information large room presentations and conferences. This is due to its’ ex- cellent Front 90 degree and Rearfrom a wide range of sources. We attend 120 degree microphones whichindustry conferences, analyst briefings, allow you to choose from multipleconduct win/loss interviews and a wide recording configurations such asvariety of other forms of research. A Front-only, Rear-only, or both/360common challenge we all face is how to degree.capture all of this data quickly and easilyand store it for review/analysis later. There are separate inputs for the LINE IN and EXT MIC IN for re-One technique I have been using for cording other sources as well as aseveral years is to capture audio record- PHONES/LINE OUT for monitor-ings of events, interviews and key meet- ing recording, playback, or send-ings so that I can focus on listening and ing output to another device.participating in the session, without hav-ing to worry about taking copious notes. I have used the H2 to record ev-I make sure everyone involved knows I erything from Win/Loss interviewsam recording and how I will be use the to weekly team meetings to ouraudio files. monthly TPMA meeting presen- tations. Previously I had tried re-My favorite portable audio recording tool cording using other handheld re-is the H2 Handy Recorder from ZOOM. corders and an add-on mic for my iPod. However, with these I oftenIt is about the size of 2 iPhones stacked found the quality of the recordingon top of each other, costs around $180, was poor and (especially to share/runs on 2 AA batteries or AC, records produce) I would have to spendbetween 50 and 500 hours (depending much time with audio editing soft- you take a look at the H2 Handy Record-on desired quality) on SD card (up to ware such as Audacity to make it usable. er from ZOOM Corporation.32GB). In addition to being an excellent With the H2, most times I do not have tostand-alone recorder, the H2 can also be run any post-processing at all. ZOOM has since progressed the line toused as an external mic for your com- the H2n and now an H4 as well. You canputer via USB. If you are looking for a high quality, por- still get H2 for $180 at Long-McQuade. table recording solution to help you cap-Unlike other handheld recorders I have ture the firehose of data that comes at - Allan Neilused in the past, the H2 is excellent at you as a Product Manager, I recommendSPONSORS LEADERSHIP TEAM Charles Dimov President Lee Garrison Secretary Niki Coons TreasurerFees collected through sponsorship help to defer the costs of obtaining exceptional Allan Neil VP Operationsspeakers, operating the web site, and building resources and tools for our members. Aldwin Neekon VP MemberThese are activities which in turn attract more members, drive higher activity on the Deepika Mediratta VP Strat.Init.web pages, and increase the exposure for our sponsors. Elizabeth Hosein VP Mrkt Com Norman Sung VP Mentoring Saeed Khan Executive See www.TPMA.ca/sponsors for details or contact us at info@TPMA.ca to find out about Commercial Sponsorship or Corporate Membership. TPMA Published: Jul 28, 2012 © 2012 Toronto Product Management Association