Technologyfor Student Success<br />Presented By:  Jennifer Day<br />Summit for Student SuccessConference October 7-8th , 2...
Why Briefings?<br />Research doesn't have to be the nightmare it is often thought to be. <br />Open to all social studies ...
What are the ABCs of Briefings?<br />*A - Authentic forms and strategies of research writing in the real world are identif...
Agenda<br />*Introduction to briefings and research<br />*Q & A session<br />*Modeling and guided briefing construction <b...
What Is Our Purpose?<br />1.  Teachers will discover how the structure of briefings support the author's purpose through s...
Self AsssessmentOf Learning Targets For Today’s Session<br />#1  	I can use my knowledge of assessments to include evidenc...
Self Assessment<br />
FORmative Assessment That Drives Instruction Includes:<br />Qualities <br />	What we want students to know & do<br />	Desc...
Principles of Research<br /> &<br /> Strategies that Help<br />
Principle 1:<br />The researcher is an expert in the field.<br />Just like adult researchers, kids must do research in are...
What Makes A Good Topic?<br />Types of T-Charts<br />Like/Hate<br />Change/Stay the Same<br />4 Columns:<br />Things I Lik...
Principle 2:<br />The topic is narrow and manageable.<br />Most original research has a very narrow focus. We don’t see to...
Strategies for focusing a <br />topic:<br />Main Idea (Thesis):<br />What’s the one most important thing the you want to f...
Principle 3:<br />The audience is well defined.<br />Research wouldn’t be done if someone wasn’t interested in it. Knowing...
	Strategies for Finding An 	Audience:<br />Brainstorming <br /><ul><li>Who would want to know this information? 	(Real wor...
Who do I want to hear about this information? 	(Real world: who would want this 	information kept secret?)</li></li></ul><...
Strategies for <br />	Generating Questions:<br /><ul><li>What questions do you want answered?
What questions would the people around you want answered?
Sticky note questions </li></li></ul><li>Principle 6:<br />Presentation matches purpose.<br />Most effective researchers u...
Strategy:  Content-Purpose- Audience<br />www.ttms.org/content_purpose_audience_packet.pdf<br />
Research Strategy #1:  Talk With People<br />List friends & Other Researchers<br />Family Members<br />Teachers & Adults<b...
Research Strategy #2:  Use the Internet<br />Search Engines & Directories<br />Reference Sites<br />Organizational Sites<b...
Research Strategy #3:  Review Periodicals<br />Newspapers<br />General Interest Magazines<br />Subject- Specific Magazines...
Research Strategy #4:  Read a Book, Watch a Show<br />Primary Sources<br />Secondary Sources<br />General Reference<br />M...
Research Strategy #5:  Asking the Right Questions<br />Subtopic #1<br />Subtopic #2<br />Subtopic #3<br />Subtopic #4<br />
What Are OtherResearch Issues?<br />Where to find the answers to your questions:<br />magazines, web pages, newspapers, we...
What About Citations?<br />Citations are the act of citing or quoting a reference to an authority or a precedent.<br />In ...
What Are Briefings?<br />Short, quick researchable pieces that can be as simple or as intricate as your imaginations can t...
What Are Some Examples ?<br />“Owning a piece of greatness” <br />The Week - 2/4/2005<br />“The origins of Santa Claus”<br...
What Makes a Briefing Look Like a Briefing ?<br />Nonfiction Elements of Text<br />Starting at the top of the page, what t...
How Is a Briefing Structured ?<br />5 - 8 content questions (bolded) <br />answers can be very simple, but are followed wi...
How Does a Briefing Sound When Read?<br />Conversational<br />Sentence Fragments<br />Clear and Concise<br />
How Does an Author Appeal to Different Types of Audiences?<br />The 3 E’s<br />Evidence<br />Ethos (emotion)<br />Logos (l...
What Is Another Form Of Briefing?<br />Interviews<br />“10 Questions for Curt Shilling”<br />Time - 10/11/2004<br />“An In...
What Are The Qualities of An Interview?<br />Title – bolded and/or decorated<br />Subheading – more commentary<br />Pictur...
How Do We Get Students to Revise Their Drafts?<br />Workshop Session- author shares with the class and opens inquiry sessi...
© 1995-2007 by Steve Peha. For more information, or additional teaching materials, please contact: Teaching That Makes Sen...
Self Assessment <br />Revisit Self Assessment <br />Successes, Challenges, New Stuff<br />Set Goals  <br />Strengths, Acco...
Works Cited By Steve Peha, Teaching That Makes Sense   http://www.ttms.org<br />MODELS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE –<br />www.t...
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Technology For Student Success - Simplifying Student Research

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"Technology for Student Success" was a presentation for teachers and administrators to model how to simplify students' research by using of content with a purpose, for an audience. Each student culminates his or her research into a briefings format.

The format is easy to use when following the ABCs of Briefings:
*A - Authentic forms and strategies of research writing in the real world are identified, as resources for the integration of all subject areas.
*B - Briefings based on content for a purpose; affecting an audience.
*C - Choice is applies and connected to community within and outside of the classroom.
Throughout the session teachers:
1. discover how the structure of briefings support the author's purpose through strategic presentation of content to affect an audience.
2. apply components of authentic learning: choice, connections, and community to increase motivation, problem solving and quality in writing.
3. use self generated, open-ended questions about a topic to guide research from a variety of resources.
4. identify what makes effective revision through a question and answer sharing format.
5. self assess their own learning and consider how to implement the research model in their own classrooms with students.

I facilitated this session for the Center for School Reform (in Kansas City, MO) at the Summit for Student Success Conference, held in Columbia, MO.

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Technology For Student Success - Simplifying Student Research

  1. 1. Technologyfor Student Success<br />Presented By: Jennifer Day<br />Summit for Student SuccessConference October 7-8th , 2007 Stoney Creek Inn, Columbia, MO<br />
  2. 2. Why Briefings?<br />Research doesn't have to be the nightmare it is often thought to be. <br />Open to all social studies areas and curriculum needs, briefings won’t take up weeks of research.<br />With the onslaught of grade level expectations, briefings will meet any research curriculum needs.<br />Students will familiarize themselves with media perspectives, generate questions about content and issues in the world, and in culmination replicate authentic writing. <br />Briefings integrate subject areas, align with Grade Level Expectations and tap into higher Depth of Knowledge (DOK) indicators, and allow students to connect with sources in the community. <br />
  3. 3. What are the ABCs of Briefings?<br />*A - Authentic forms and strategies of research writing in the real world are identified, as resources for the integration of all subject areas.<br />*B - Briefings based on content for a purpose; affecting an audience.<br />*C - Choice is applies and connected to community within and outside of the classroom.<br />
  4. 4. Agenda<br />*Introduction to briefings and research<br />*Q & A session<br />*Modeling and guided briefing construction <br />*Sharing <br />*Discussion of classroom application<br />
  5. 5. What Is Our Purpose?<br />1. Teachers will discover how the structure of briefings support the author's purpose through strategic presentation of content to affect an audience.<br />2. Teachers will apply components of authentic learning: choice, connections, and community to increase motivation, problem solving and quality in writing.<br />3. Teachers use self generated, open-ended questions about a topic to guide research from a variety of resources.<br />4. Teachers identify what makes effective revision through a question and answer sharing format.<br />
  6. 6. Self AsssessmentOf Learning Targets For Today’s Session<br />#1 I can use my knowledge of assessments to include evidence of students’ learning to depict the<br /> AFFECTIVE growth (motivation)<br /> COGNITIVE growth (thinking)<br /> PSYCHOMOTOR growth (reflection)<br />#2 I can use my knowledge of authentic forms of writing to evaluate information critically, seek information and generate knowledge for an authentic purpose.<br />#3 I can use my knowledge of CONTENT-PURPOSE-AUDIENCE strategy to communicate content with voice.<br />#4 I can use technology in a variety of ways and choose appropriate tools for tasks.<br />#5 I can use my knowledge of nonfiction texts to identify nonfiction elements used by authors for a purpose.<br />#6 I can participate in discussions with others of various backgrounds to build background knowledge.<br />
  7. 7. Self Assessment<br />
  8. 8. FORmative Assessment That Drives Instruction Includes:<br />Qualities <br /> What we want students to know & do<br /> Descriptions- not just number scores<br />Strategies<br /> How we develop thinking<br />Procedures<br /> How we do what we do<br />
  9. 9. Principles of Research<br /> &<br /> Strategies that Help<br />
  10. 10. Principle 1:<br />The researcher is an expert in the field.<br />Just like adult researchers, kids must do research in areas they are familiar with.<br />
  11. 11. What Makes A Good Topic?<br />Types of T-Charts<br />Like/Hate<br />Change/Stay the Same<br />4 Columns:<br />Things I Like<br />Things I Care About<br />Things I’m Interested In<br />Things I Know A Lot About<br />Unit Survey Examples : Civil War, States, Habitats, Famous Missourians, Famous Scientists, Civil Rights Movement, Sports, Author, Time Periods, Religions, Classification...<br />
  12. 12. Principle 2:<br />The topic is narrow and manageable.<br />Most original research has a very narrow focus. We don’t see too many comprehensive histories of Europe or complete analyses of every aspect of a company’s operation. And when we do, the research spent months or years researching.<br />
  13. 13. Strategies for focusing a <br />topic:<br />Main Idea (Thesis):<br />What’s the one most important thing the you want to find out in your research? <br />Purpose: <br />What do you want the audience to think and/or action to take after they read about your topic?<br />
  14. 14. Principle 3:<br />The audience is well defined.<br />Research wouldn’t be done if someone wasn’t interested in it. Knowing who that someone is, and the nature of their interest, helps researchers focus their efforts on the right questions and the best presentation of the answers. <br />
  15. 15. Strategies for Finding An Audience:<br />Brainstorming <br /><ul><li>Who would want to know this information? (Real world: who would pay money for </li></ul>this information?)<br /><ul><li>Where could this information be published?
  16. 16. Who do I want to hear about this information? (Real world: who would want this information kept secret?)</li></li></ul><li>Principle 5:<br />Neither author nor audience knows the result.<br />Researchers don’t research questions they already know the answers to. Nor do they research things their audience already knows.<br />
  17. 17. Strategies for <br /> Generating Questions:<br /><ul><li>What questions do you want answered?
  18. 18. What questions would the people around you want answered?
  19. 19. Sticky note questions </li></li></ul><li>Principle 6:<br />Presentation matches purpose.<br />Most effective researchers use a variety of methods to present their results. Sometimes results are written in papers, but more often they are presented in some kind of talk often with handouts, slides, or other props. Sometimes researchers express their results in working models.<br />
  20. 20. Strategy: Content-Purpose- Audience<br />www.ttms.org/content_purpose_audience_packet.pdf<br />
  21. 21. Research Strategy #1: Talk With People<br />List friends & Other Researchers<br />Family Members<br />Teachers & Adults<br />Experts in the Field<br />
  22. 22. Research Strategy #2: Use the Internet<br />Search Engines & Directories<br />Reference Sites<br />Organizational Sites<br />Specialty Sites<br />
  23. 23. Research Strategy #3: Review Periodicals<br />Newspapers<br />General Interest Magazines<br />Subject- Specific Magazines<br />Other Publications<br />
  24. 24. Research Strategy #4: Read a Book, Watch a Show<br />Primary Sources<br />Secondary Sources<br />General Reference<br />Multimedia<br />TV, DVD, CD-ROM, Etc.<br />
  25. 25. Research Strategy #5: Asking the Right Questions<br />Subtopic #1<br />Subtopic #2<br />Subtopic #3<br />Subtopic #4<br />
  26. 26. What Are OtherResearch Issues?<br />Where to find the answers to your questions:<br />magazines, web pages, newspapers, web articles, teachers, parents, librarians, books<br />
  27. 27. What About Citations?<br />Citations are the act of citing or quoting a reference to an authority or a precedent.<br />In the real world, we don’t “see” the citations. When needed, editors verify sources and information. However, in the real world of education, we need the citation.<br />
  28. 28. What Are Briefings?<br />Short, quick researchable pieces that can be as simple or as intricate as your imaginations can take you.<br />
  29. 29. What Are Some Examples ?<br />“Owning a piece of greatness” <br />The Week - 2/4/2005<br />“The origins of Santa Claus”<br />The Week - 12/24/2004<br />
  30. 30. What Makes a Briefing Look Like a Briefing ?<br />Nonfiction Elements of Text<br />Starting at the top of the page, what things are on the page?<br />Magazine title and date<br />Title of article (bolded)<br />Subheading with guided question (italicized- used to frame an opinion<br />Picture with caption<br />Charts, graphs or tables to support opinion statistically<br />Side bar with heading (extra info in a very detailed paragraph)<br />Final question leaves the reader with something to think about and attempts to get the audience to form an opinion.<br />
  31. 31. How Is a Briefing Structured ?<br />5 - 8 content questions (bolded) <br />answers can be very simple, but are followed with an explanation<br />answers support answering the guiding question<br />
  32. 32. How Does a Briefing Sound When Read?<br />Conversational<br />Sentence Fragments<br />Clear and Concise<br />
  33. 33. How Does an Author Appeal to Different Types of Audiences?<br />The 3 E’s<br />Evidence<br />Ethos (emotion)<br />Logos (logic)<br />
  34. 34. What Is Another Form Of Briefing?<br />Interviews<br />“10 Questions for Curt Shilling”<br />Time - 10/11/2004<br />“An Interview With Elvis Aaron Pressley’s Ghost”<br />Student Example – 4th grade<br />
  35. 35. What Are The Qualities of An Interview?<br />Title – bolded and/or decorated<br />Subheading – more commentary<br />Picture – with caption<br />5-10 Questions – bolded<br />Answers are written in the interviewed person’s voice<br />Ending / Sidebar – included reflection and source information<br />
  36. 36. How Do We Get Students to Revise Their Drafts?<br />Workshop Session- author shares with the class and opens inquiry session. <br />Use 6 Traits Research Criteria <br />Use Content-Purpose-Audience Revision <br />
  37. 37. © 1995-2007 by Steve Peha. For more information, or additional teaching materials, please contact: Teaching That Makes Sense, Inc. <br />E-mail stevepeha@ttms.org • Web www.ttms.org<br />
  38. 38. Self Assessment <br />Revisit Self Assessment <br />Successes, Challenges, New Stuff<br />Set Goals <br />Strengths, Accomplishments, Goals,<br /> Instruction & Support = SAGIS<br />Commit To Results<br />
  39. 39. Works Cited By Steve Peha, Teaching That Makes Sense http://www.ttms.org<br />MODELS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE –<br />www.ttms.org/models_that_make_a_difference_packet.pdf<br />Want to bring more consistency to the practices in your school or district? Start with models that make a difference. Models help us organize and explain what we do. That makes doing things more efficient and getting more people to do them together more likely. Models are also compact. Getting everyone on the same page is a lot easier when there’s only one page to get everyone on.<br />IF YOU’RE ACCOUNTABLE FOR LITERACY, GET A GOOD CPA<br />www.ttms.org/content_purpose_audience_packet.pdf<br /> While perfect for persuasive and informational writing, the Content-Purpose-Audience strategy is a great pre-write for any form. Beyond pre-writing, it makes an excellent revision tool as well. CPA can also be used as a reading strategy to dissect any type of text. If you could only take one strategy to class with you each day, CPA would probably be your best choice.<br />CRITICAL THINKING: IT’S AS EASY AS WHAT-WHY-HOW<br />www.ttms.org/what_why_how_packet.pdf<br />Most logical thought follows a simple structure: What do I think? Why do I think it? How do I know? The What-Why-How strategy captures this pattern in a compact and easy-to-use tool that helps students build effective logical arguments in expository and persuasive essays, research papers, essay questions, and constructed responses. It’s also a terrific non-fiction reading strategy.<br />
  40. 40. Evaluation<br />Thank You & <br />Let’s Keep In Touch!<br />~ Jennifer Day ~ <br />Cell: 816-665-2378 <br />Email:teacherjday@yahoo.com<br />Information profile: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/jennifer-day/b/7a3/373<br />Center for School Reform<br />Northland Human Services Center, Suite 2200, <br />3100 NE 83rd Street, KC, MO 64119<br />

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